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Asus ROG Swift PG43UQ 4K Gaming Monitor Review: Jumbo Screen, Extra Bright

A massive gaming monitor with 1,000 nits, HDR, Adaptive-Sync and 144 Hz.

Asus ROG Swift PG43UQ
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Asus)

At $1,500, does the PG43UQ have what it takes to rival some of the best HDR monitors? Though it has an edge-array backlight, and not a FALD or OLED one, the PG43UQ’s Dynamic Dimming feature provides superb contrast, thanks to low black levels and an accurate luminance curve.

Here we describe how we test HDR monitors

HDR Brightness and Contrast 

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Asus ROG Swift PG43UQ

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Asus ROG Swift PG43UQ

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Asus ROG Swift PG43UQ

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The ROG Swift PG43UQ has no problem making good on VESA’s DisplayHDR 1000 certification. We measured 1,084 nits from both full-field and 25% window patterns. We hit this number in all three HDR modes with Max Brightness set to, you guessed it, 1,000 nits. If you want to dial that back, choose either 600 or 400 nits from the menu.

Of the monitors in the group, only the two 43-inchers have edge backlights; the rest have superior FALD units. But the PG43UQ isn’t far behind. In most environments, users will be hard-pressed to see the difference. Though it came in last in the contrast ratio test, 27,382.4:1 is an impressive number. One might see a difference in a blacked-out room, but in most spaces, the typical user will think the PG43UQ’s HDR looks equal to the other monitors here. 

Grayscale, EOTF and Color 

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Asus ROG Swift PG43UQ

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Asus ROG Swift PG43UQ

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The PG43UQ’s HDR grayscale and luminance accuracy is beyond reproach. We measured all three HDR modes and got nearly identical results. GamingHDR is the default and the setting we used for all hands-on and gameplay tests. There were no visible grayscale errors, and the EOTF curve stays quite close to the yellow line. The tone-mapping point is specced at 75%, but the monitor makes a soft transition at 70% -- although that’s not visible with the naked eye. 

In the HDR color test, we see a bit of over-saturation in all colors except green at 100% brightness, where the native gamut is a tad short of the mark. Your eyes won’t be able to see this though, and the error is typical of extended-color displays. We found the PG43UQ’s HDR color to be exemplary; easily comparable to pro screens like the CP7271K.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How We Test Monitors

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Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.