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Intel's 'Larrabee' on Par With GeForce GTX 285

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 46 comments

Traveling to Taiwan for Computex usually yields a lot of components, future launches, and lots of random hardware.

This time however, we waned to find out a little bit more about what Intel had up its sleeve for Larrabee--the company's next generation graphics solution, that's suppose to blow the water out of everything in the market.

According to one close Intel partner that wished not to be named, this isn't the case. We were told that Larrabee is currently only capable of performance levels similar to Nvidia's GeForce GTX 285. While this isn't a bad thing in by any measure, it doesn't quite line up with a lot of the heat that we've been told.

The partner said that with current Larrabee silicon, things may change down the line, but it did not expect Intel's graphics solution to take the high-end of the market. At the time of Larrabee's release, both AMD/ATI and Nvidia will introduce newer and faster versions of its GPUs. Despite this, it's still important to keep in mind that Intel has always been an enabler of technology, pushing other industry leaders to adopt new technology. This was the case with Intel's infamous i740.

Intel told us several weeks ago that Larrabee would be taking the same approach as Intel's SSD drives. Silent. No frills. But market dominating when released.

At this point, we still think it's a bit too early to draw very solid conclusions, but, this is what we were told.

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  • 10 Hide
    Tindytim , June 2, 2009 3:08 PM
    5)"In soviet russia, water blows market on you"
Other Comments
  • 6 Hide
    Tindytim , June 2, 2009 12:11 PM
    Considering the general concept behind the Larrabee, if it's performing on the same level as the GTX 285, on whatever testing was performed to get that number, I'm excited.
  • -6 Hide
    Tindytim , June 2, 2009 12:26 PM
    nelson_nelI'm usually not that excited to give a single company more expansion of it's already titan market share, but that's just me.

    Who, Intel? I didn't know they had a large percentage of the Discrete graphics market share.

    I don't remember anytime this decade I read about the lastest Intel card.

    nelson_nelIt's worth while to take a wait-and-see approach, but I doubt I'll jump on this band wagon.

    Excitement and blind faith are two different things. Obviously, it could turn out to be crap, but it interests me at this point.
  • 5 Hide
    stray_gator , June 2, 2009 12:37 PM
    so current larrabee won't break performance records.
    still, if it will be considerably cheaper / cooler / less power-hungry / better scaling, well, it might still be something to get excited about. even if only a little.
  • 6 Hide
    Anonymous , June 2, 2009 12:47 PM
    Okay seriously, the same performance as the gtx285, now that has to be seen to be beleived, and if it is the case, then intel have really made significant headroom in the Graphics R&D department and with sustained developement can become competitive, but I still take this with a pinch of salt!
  • 8 Hide
    seboj , June 2, 2009 12:55 PM
    TindytimWho, Intel? I didn't know they had a large percentage of the Discrete graphics market share.I don't remember anytime this decade I read about the lastest Intel card.


    Discrete? No. Last I checked, however, Intel did have almost 50% overall graphics chip market share, due to their cheap integrated solutions and the rise of netbooks.

    Anyways, I'm excited for Larrabee, if for nothing else than to provide some more competition to cause nvidia/AMD to create even better cards.
  • 0 Hide
    SirCrono , June 2, 2009 12:56 PM
    My biggest hope for Larrabee is almost linear scaling in multi "gpu" scenarios, I mean, i really sucks when you pay 2 times the money for a sli or crossfire setup and you get just 1.2 or 1.5 times the performance (sometimes even worse).

    Also, if Larrabee it's at leat mildly successful (specially in the power consumption and size areas) it might push Nvidia and ATI to deliver a better (in the "more innovative" way) product.

    In conclusion, high hopes here, in many areas too.
  • -2 Hide
    Tindytim , June 2, 2009 12:59 PM
    sebojDiscrete? No. Last I checked, however, Intel did have almost 50% overall graphics chip market share, due to their cheap integrated solutions and the rise of netbooks.

    I know that, my point was, no one buys intel graphics solutions. OEMs buy them. And they're only meant for the most basic of tasks. Intel doesn't hold any of the market for people that work with graphics.
  • 0 Hide
    gkay09 , June 2, 2009 1:04 PM
    As the article says, it will have a tough time competing with the high-end market, but if the pricing is right, then it should be a very good competition like the ATI cards now...
  • 0 Hide
    TheMan1214 , June 2, 2009 1:12 PM
    I still take this with a a lot of skepticism, but it wouldn't surprise me if Intel did some good stuff to push nvidia and ati at the very least.

    And maybe if they do good things with heat,power,etc it might be worth checking out.go figure i don't like buying multiple cards for my comp
  • 0 Hide
    seboj , June 2, 2009 2:04 PM
    It'll be a win for Intel if they can provide a similar card that's either cheaper, more efficient, or cooler, as it will gain them contracts - And any contract taken away from AMD / Nvidia is a win for Intel.
  • 3 Hide
    roofus , June 2, 2009 2:51 PM
    We wont know until people have these in their hands to test. Dont expect Intel to say "it has the power of a GeForce2 for 85 dollars" when it sounds better to say "it is currently only capable of performance levels similar to Nvidia's GeForce GTX 285". The important question here is are they talking about gaming performance or some synthetic benchmark. Some cards tear up 3DMark but don't deliver but meager performance over much cheaper solutions.
    Like anyone else, I welcome more players in the game that bring good products. We really only have two choices right now but both deliver good products so we cant go wrong. Intel has to come in this swinging or interest will evaporate quickly.
  • 1 Hide
    lamorpa , June 2, 2009 3:05 PM
    "that's suppose to blow the water out of everything in the market"
    This might be better phrased as:
    1) "that's suppose to blow everything in the water out of the market"
    2) "that's the market this is suppose to blow water on everything"
    3) "that's the water that is suppose to blow the market for everything"
  • 1 Hide
    seboj , June 2, 2009 3:07 PM
    4) "that's the market that everything is supposed to blow water"
  • 10 Hide
    Tindytim , June 2, 2009 3:08 PM
    5)"In soviet russia, water blows market on you"
  • 0 Hide
    zodiacfml , June 2, 2009 3:56 PM
    i predict, larrabee can be a cheap alternative and won't give exciting gaming performance especially when you consider the difficulty in making good Drivers.
    what's exciting is how it can vastly improve various applications especially in the server and workstation markets.
  • 1 Hide
    scryer_360 , June 2, 2009 4:07 PM
    My problem here is that Intel is getting into the GPU market at all. They already have a dominating share of the CPU market, and my fear is that Intel could write out support for GPU's other than their own on their platforms chipsets.

    It wouldn't happen initially, no if Intel did that they'd be attacked from all sides. Instead Intel may try and slowly leverage out the other chip makers in the business. AMD and ATI are two sides of the same coin, so they can continue to compete, but they are already on the ropes from the stiff competition from Intel and Nvidia. Once Nvidia chips can only run on AMD platforms, its short work for Intel to push AMD off the map too.

    Something needs to happen here. Intel already has the ability (although they haven't exercised it) to become a true monopoly, the reason they haven't took the steps to see AMD immediately goes out of business is because if they did they fear regulatory response. But just because they are taking a slower route to pushing all other chipmakers out of the market doesn't mean they aren't trying to push other chipmakers out of the market.

    I'm glad that Intel has provided such good, low cost components in recent history, but that can change the moment AMD closes its doors. The near future is bright, with more competition leading to better prices and performance, but the future of 5 to ten years from no is getting dark.
  • -2 Hide
    lamorpa , June 2, 2009 4:11 PM
    "that, how you say, is how everything is suppose to blow the water market out"
  • 7 Hide
    Anonymous , June 2, 2009 4:30 PM
    Incorrect:
    "that's suppose to blow the water out of everything in the market."

    Correct:
    that's supposed to blow everything in the market out of the water.
  • 1 Hide
    thegh0st , June 2, 2009 4:51 PM
    ^ at least someone knows the saying...

    and all I gotta say...

    talk is cheap.
  • -1 Hide
    lamorpa , June 2, 2009 4:52 PM
    Maybe Larrabee is very good at rendering water and waves:

    "that's suppose to blow the water better than everything on the market"
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