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Asus Drops Down to 2GB GDDR5 for Latest Radeon 550 Graphics Card

Asus Phoenix Radeon 550 (Image credit: Asus)

Last month, AMD publicly acknowledged that 4GB graphics cards are a thing of the past, saying it demonstrated a performance uplift of up to 24% on the 8GB variant of the Radeon RX 5500 XT over the 4GB variant. But this hasn't stopped Asus from releasing the Phoenix Radeon 550 (spotted via @momomo_us).

The Phoenix Radeon 550 (PH-550-2G) is likely an attempt at getting rid of older silicon rather than making the best graphics cards on the market. It arrives with a compact and dual-slot design. With a length of 19.2cm, the graphics card caters to small form-factor (SFF) PC builds. 

Asus endowed the Phoenix Radeon 550 with a simple cooling system that consists of a circular heatsink and a single dual-ball bearing cooling fan that boasts IP5X certification for dust resistance. 

Asus Phoenix Radeon 550 (Image credit: Asus)

Inside, the Phoenix Radeon 550 packs AMD's Polaris 12 (codename Lexa) silicon, which is built with TSMC's 14nm process node. Lexa features 512 Stream Processors (SPs) that boost up to 1,183 MHz. On the memory side, the Phoenix Radeon 550 provides 2GB of 6 Gbps GDDR5 memory across a 64 bit memory interface. The reference specification for memory is 7 Gbps so Asus seems to be cutting some corners with the Phoenix Radeon 550 by sticking slower memory chips in it.

The Phoenix Radeon 550 can support up to three displays simultaneously, thanks to the graphics card's multiple outputs. Asus slapped a DVI-D port, HDMI 2.0b port and a DisplayPort 1.4 output on the graphics card. 

The Radeon 550 is a 50W graphics card, so it doesn't depend on any PCIe power connectors to function properly. A 400W power supply is more than enough to supply the graphics card.

Asus hasn't revealed availability or pricing for the Phoenix Radeon 550 graphics card yet. 

  • King_V
    It's not a matter of it being hard to get rid of older silicon, it's a matter of the RX550 and RX560 prices being ridiculous. In the best case scenario, they're only slightly less than the RX 570 4GB.

    Why would anyone pay almost RX570 prices for an RX550 or RX560?
    Reply
  • NightHawkRMX
    The cost has to be cheap. RX550 and RX560 really made sense in the mining craze since they were cheap, but now they cost about as much as an RX570.

    If Asus makes this card around $70 new to slightly undercut with a GT1030, sure it may have a purpose as an upgrade for OEM pcs.

    Regardless of price, a used RX570 will always be a better value than any other RX card. I got a 4gb Sapphire Pulse RX570 for $80 for example.
    Reply
  • King_V
    NightHawkRMX said:
    The cost has to be cheap. RX550 and RX560 really made sense in the mining craze since they were cheap, but now they cost about as much as an RX570.

    If Asus makes this card around $70 new to slightly undercut with a GT1030, sure it may have a purpose as an upgrade for OEM pcs.

    Regardless of price, a used RX570 will always be a better value than any other RX card. I got a 4gb Sapphire Pulse RX570 for $80 for example.
    I was gonna say "Well, maybe not when that one RX 570 4GB model was available for $99.99" but then again, the Sapphire Pulse has a better cooler than most.
    Reply
  • King_V
    Upon further consideration, why is this news? I thought AMD had a plethora of variants for the 550 and 560. If my info is accurate:

    ModelShadersVRAMRX 5505122GBRX 5505124GBRX 5506402GBRX 5506404GBRX 5608962GBRX 5608964GBRX 56010242GBRX 56010244GB
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    King_V said:
    Why would anyone pay almost RX570 prices for an RX550 or RX560?
    People desperate for a 50W GPU?
    Reply
  • urbanman2004
    Really Asus, really? :rolleyes:
    Reply