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Best Holiday Gaming Keyboard Deals

Gaming Keyboards Deal cover
(Image credit: SteelSeries, Corsair)

Deals season presents a great opportunity to save on peripherals for yourself and your family members. Even the best gaming keyboards are usually in a great price range to give them as a gift, and the best deals make them even more affordable.

Most gaming keyboards worth their salt are mechanical, and while it's easy to underestimate how much using a mechanical keyboard can improve your typing experience, think of it as the difference between using a touchscreen and a membrane keyboard. The best mechanical keyboards have much greater feedback and satisfaction for each keystroke, and if you haven't tried one yet or still have family you need to convince, now's a great time to do so.

Many gaming keyboards also often come with extra buttons that you can program either to input specific keys or even entire strings of keys (called "macros"). Plus, don't forget the RGB lighting that most include, which lets you rock your gamer style and can even help you game in dark environments more easily. Some RGB lighting is even reactive to what happens in game, upping your immersion.

Don't underestimate how much a gaming keyboard can help with non-gaming tasks, either. If you grew up with a typewriter or an old terminal, prepare yourself for a similarly satisfying clunk on your keystokes.

Below, we're listing all the best holiday gaming keyboard deals we can find. Stay tuned throughout the end of November to get your hands on a great new plank.

Specs to Look For: Gaming Keyboard Deals

Size - Gaming keyboards come in a variety of sizes, from full-size (includes a numpad) to tenkeyless (does not include a tenkey) to 65% (no function row or tenkey) to 60% (no function row, tenkey or arrow keys). Take note of how much desk space you have and which buttons you need before shopping.

Switch - Gaming keyboards come with a wide variety of switches, often from either Cherry MX or Kailh but sometimes from smaller companies or even from the keyboard manufacturer itself. There's three major types of switches. Linear switches (ex: Cherry MX Red) are quieter and actuate faster because they go straight down.  Clicky switches (ex: Cherry MX Blue) offer much more feedback and make a pleasant click noise when depressed. Tactile (ex: Cherry MX Brown) switches are like clicky but make no click noise. There are also unique switches such optical or electro-capacitive, plus membrane gaming keyboards (which usually aren't worth it, but occasionally surprise us).

Gaming Keyboard Deals: Quick Links

Best Gaming Keyboard Deals

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Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition TKL: was $129, now $74 at Best Buy (opens in new tab)
Razer's Huntsman TE is a great way to get your hands on the company's optical switches and Chroma lighting without having to put up with a tenkey.

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MSI Vigor GK50 Elite: was $69, now $49 at Newegg (opens in new tab)
This full-sized keyboard is ready for the modern gamer who doesn't want to empty their wallet in the process. It has 104 keys illuminated by RGB LEDs that use Kailh Blue switches. It's a wired keyboard featuring a brushed metal finish.

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Razer Ornata: was $99, now $59 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

This full-sized keyboard has an included wrist rest and elaborate RGB backlighting that extends beyond the keycaps. It's also got dedicated media keys and "mecha-membrane" switches that aim to add tactile feeling to membrane style keys.

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Razer Tartarus V2 Gaming Keypad: was $79, now $49 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
If you don't need a full keyboard but still want the keyboard and mouse experience, consider the Razer Tartarus V2, which comes with just the buttons you need for a one-handed gaming keyboard experience.

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Redragon K585 Gaming Keypad: was $54, now $46 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
An alternative to the Razer Tartarus, this gaming keypad from Redragon uses blue switches and has a more conventional key layout and labeling system, albeit with the right side of the keyboard still omitted. Comes with 7 programmable macro keys.

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SteelSeries Apex Pro: was $199, now $163 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This high-end SteelSeries keyboard uses analog "Hall Effect" switches that feel linear but let you manually adjust when they actuate. It also comes with a small OLED display that helps you adjust settings and can also show extra information in some games.

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Razer Huntsman Elite: was $199, now $129 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

Razer's Huntsman Elite is a full-sized RGB keyboard with linear optical switches, dedicated and reprogrammable media keys, a volume dial and an included magnetic wrist rest.

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Razer Huntsman Mini: was $119, now $79 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This barebones Razer keyboard gives you clicky optical switches and Razer RGB style in a small, 60% format that ditches a tenkey, then function row and arrow keys.

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Corsair K55 RGB Pro: was $49, now $39 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

This membrane keyboard from Corsair balances out its lack of mechanical switches with IP42 dust and spill resistance, dedicated media and volume keys, an included wrist rest and 6 macro keys with built-in Elgato Stream Deck software integration.

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Logitech G910 Orion Spectrum: was $99, now $89 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This deal is small, but this keyboard has a lot of features. It has Logitech's in-house Romer-G switches and a divisive design, but also has a tenkey, media keys, a function row and macro buttons. It's also got a dock for your smartphone, which Logitech's software can use to show system data and extra information in some games.

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Logitech G Pro: was $129, now $99 at Amazon
(opens in new tab)This is a tenkeyless Logitech board with a game mode (aka it turns off the Windows key), a settings button, a barebones design, the ability to map function keys as macros and Logitech's own tactile GX Blue switches.

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Razer Turret: was $249, now $199 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
The Razer turret is a unique wireless option that pairs a wireless tenkeyless keyboard with bespoke Razer mechanical switches, a detachable magnetic mousemat and a 16,000 DPI gaming mouse. The idea it to easily enable gaming from the couch. 

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Logitech G915 Wireless: was $249, now $199 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This wireless full-sized keyboard from Logitech comes with your choice of clicky, linear or tactile low profile switches. These switches are in-house from Logitech. The keyboard connects via either Bluetooth or Logitech's renowned Lightspeed wireless connectivity standard. 

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Logitech G915 TKL Wireless: was $229, now $179 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This is a TKL version of the G915 that still uses Lightspeed connectivity and Logitech's own clicky, linear or tactile switches. Like its larger cousin, it can also connect via Bluetooth. 

Best Productivity Keyboard Deals

While you can game on pretty much any keyboard, we're also keeping track of deals on keyboards made specifically with productivity in mind.

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Microsoft Ergonomic Desktop Keyboard: was $89, now $49 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This is a membrane keyboard, but its ergonomic shape should make for more comfortable office work. Plus, it's got an emoji button and an included barebones mouse.

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Logitech G613 Lightspeed: was $129, now $70 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This is technically a gaming keyboard, but its plain style, wristrest, lack of RGB, wireless connectivity and plentiful media keys make it perfect for productivity, too. You do get macro keys, plus Logitech's own Romer-G switches.

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Logitech K400 Plus: was $39, now $17 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
The Logitech K400 Plus is a lifesaver for anyone with a living room PC. Its combination of a simple membrane keyboard, a laptop style touchpad and media keys make it an inexpensive but easy way to control a computer from a distance.

You can find even more savings at our best PC gaming deals page. We're also tracking the best monitor deals, best CPU deals, best SSD deals, best gaming laptop deals, best keyboard deals, best gaming mouse deals and the best PC hardware deals overall.

Makers and hobbyists will find sales by checking out the best 3D printer deals, best Raspberry Pi deals and best robot deals. If you're shopping for a graphics card, we even have advice on how to find the best RTX 3080 deals, best RTX 3070 deals and best RTX 3060 deals you can find in this challenging market.

Michelle Ehrhardt is an editor at Tom's Hardware. She's been following tech since her family got a Gateway running Windows 95, and is now on her third custom-built system. Her work has been published in publications like Paste, The Atlantic, and Kill Screen, just to name a few. She also holds a master's degree in game design from NYU.