This 8TB Inland PCIe Gen 4 SSD Is 27% Off, Still $1,100

Man dreams of an island and a fast 8TB SSD
(Image credit: Shutterstock/Inland)

If you've got throwing around and piling up on the floor money, Inland's Performance Plus M.2 SSD promises to deliver both cavernous capacity (8TB) and blistering PCIe 4.0 speeds (7000/5800MB/s sequential reads and writes). It also has a bonkers endurance rating of 6000TBW, which means I'd probably die of old age before wearing this thing out. On paper at least, this really is the boot drive of my dreams, and it's on sale at Amazon for 27% off!  

8TB Inland PCIe Gen 4 M.2 SSD:  was $1499, now $1099 at Amazon (opens in new tab)

8TB Inland PCIe Gen 4 M.2 SSD: was $1499, now $1099 at Amazon (opens in new tab)
This M.2 SSD is physically tiny, but stores 8 million megabytes. And it's fast, with rated speeds up to 7000MB/s, plus an endurance rating of 6000 terabytes written. So many beautiful numbers.

Unfortunately, that's 27% off of $1,500. At $1,100 I'd love to have one of these in my next build (heck, why not two?). But much like the RTX 4080, it feels somewhat hard to argue for unless your financial cares are nil and you realy crave big boot drive bragging rights. After all, 4TB drives have dropped in price precipitously, and really who has 8TB of data that all has to be on the fastest storage possible?

Let's put it another way. A similarly fast 4TB WD Black SN850X goes for $374 (opens in new tab) right now, or a price of $0.094 per GB. The 2TB drive costs $169 (opens in new tab), or just $0.085 per GB. So this 8TB monster at $0.137 per GB comes at a significant premium. The difficulty is stuffing in enough NAND to hit 8TB in an M.2 form factor.

Are you planning on downloading your entire Steam library and turning off the internet forever? Actually, now that I think about it that might be worth $1,100. If only most games (and my line of work) didn't require an active (or at least occasional) internet connection.

Maybe by the time I sort out all the games I could play on a private internet-free island with my massive and speedy boot drive, the 8TB Inland PCIe Gen 4 SSD will be even more affordable. Now, who wants to sell me a private island (preferably off the northern coast of Scotland) and an RTX 4090 at a reasonable price? I've got big, fast boot drive dreams.

Matt Safford

After a rough start with the Mattel Aquarius as a child, Matt built his first PC in the late 1990s and ventured into mild PC modding in the early 2000s. He’s spent the last 15 years covering emerging technology for Smithsonian, Popular Science, and Consumer Reports, while testing components and PCs for Computer Shopper, PCMag and Digital Trends.

  • InvalidError
    It's the boot drive of your dreams
    I like to keep my OS and data physically separate. What way, I can physically remove my data from the system when re-installing an OS to prevent data destruction by a confused installer.
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    InvalidError said:
    I like to keep my OS and data physically separate. What way, I can physically remove my data from the system when re-installing an OS to prevent data destruction by a confused installer.
    Same here.

    6x SSD, each with their own main purpose.
    Reply
  • Colif
    I can remember in the late 90's thinking 500mb drives were so big, no way you could fill that with documents. Now... 8tb is still the same to me. I don't even use the 4tb I have now. I don't know what every one needs it all for. Decides its probably better I don't ask :)
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    Colif said:
    I don't even use the 4tb I have now. I don't know what every one needs it all for. Decides its probably better I don't ask :)
    The most benign answer I can think of is hoarding - TBs can fill up quick if you are the type who rarely deletes anything. Hoarding is basically the only reason I have an external 4TB HDD.
    Reply
  • Colif
    i was scarred by having a bunch of hdd died long ago and I just don't bother filling drives up now if they might just die randomly. At least backups mean I just lose time now.
    Reply
  • drtweak
    Colif said:
    I can remember in the late 90's thinking 500mb drives were so big, no way you could fill that with documents. Now... 8tb is still the same to me. I don't even use the 4tb I have now. I don't know what every one needs it all for. Decides its probably better I don't ask :)

    Back in I think Xmas of 03 my dad got me a 40 Gig drive. Was running 2x4GB and 1x2Gb and didn't have them filled. When i opened this up I was all "How am i ever going to fill this thing up! Now here I am with a 50TB home server XD
    Reply
  • DaTruAndi
    It is MicroCenter’s store brand and it has been sold for 999 for a few weeks now (even the heat sink version) at least if you bother going directly to their website and not check only Amazon. Unfortunately this is an example of lazy journalism not doing basic research here.

    https://www.microcenter.com/product/651930/inland-gaming-performance-plus-8tb-ssd-3d-tlc-nand-pcie-nvme-gen-4-x-4-m2-2280-heatsink-internal-solid-state-drive
    https://www.microcenter.com/product/651927/inland-performance-plus-8tb-3d-tlc-nand-pcie-gen-4-x4-nvme-m2-internal-ssd
    Reply
  • PBme
    Colif said:
    I can remember in the late 90's thinking 500mb drives were so big, no way you could fill that with documents. Now... 8tb is still the same to me. I don't even use the 4tb I have now. I don't know what every one needs it all for. Decides its probably better I don't ask :)
    Hundreds of different use cases. Games can quickly fill space. But large of consumer storage is generally about video. Personal or commercial.
    I just upgraded my 3 16tb drives to 4 18 for my movie server (UHD + BR + features can be 150GB per movie).
    Reply