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Intel Core i5-L16G7 Lakefield CPU Specifications Listed on UserBenchmark

Intel Lakefield CPU

Intel Lakefield CPU (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Intel's Lakefield processors won't just be debuting with Intel's 3D Foveros packaging, they'll also introduce a new nomenclature, as per a UserBenchmark listing detailing alleged specifications for the Intel Core i5-L16G7. 

The usage of the letter L is likely Intel's way of specifying that it's a Lakefield processor. Lakefield also borrows inspiration from Ice Lake's naming scheme. The G with the number denotes the graphics tier.

The i5-L16G7 arrives with five cores and five threads with a 1.4 GHz base and 1.75 GHz boost clock. Lakefield utilizes a design that's similar to Arm's big.LITTLE architecture. The one high-performance core is accompanied by smaller, low-powered cores.

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Intel Core i5-L16G7

Intel Core i5-L16G7 (Image credit: UserBenchmark)
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Intel Lakefield CPU

Intel Lakefield CPU (Image credit: Primate Labs Inc.)
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Intel Lakefield CPU

Intel Lakefield CPU (Image credit: Primate Labs Inc.)

In the case of the i5-L16G7, the five-core part features one Sunny Cove core and four Tremont cores. Logically, the cores will have different clock speeds. However, it's impossible to tell whether UserBenchmark's reported clock speeds belong to the Sunny Cove core or the Tremont cores.

Lakefield processors will rely on Intel's Gen11 graphics solution and sport up to 64 execution units (EUs). An unidentified Lakefield chip has already gone through the Geekbench 5 benchmark. The processor scored 3,592 and 3,659 points with the Vulkan API. This would put the Lakefield part in the same ballpark as the dual-core i3-1005G1 Ice Lake chip, which scores between 3,041 and 3,776 on the same API.

Lakefield has already started showing up in devices, such as the Lenovo X1 Fold, which is scheduled to debut in mid-2020 for $2,499. 

  • N_tell
    Seem kinda weak...
    Reply
  • bit_user
    N_tell said:
    Seem kinda weak...
    I think they're aimed at ultra-light tablet/laptop convertibles that have no fans. So, you'd want to compare it to the old M-series, I believe.

    https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/series/185341/8th-generation-intel-core-m-processors.html
    Reply
  • joeblowsmynose
    This five core processor (or an earlier brother) was spotted quite some time ago somewhere in some benchmark suite or probably just in documentation somewhere -- I thought it just never materialize but looks like its still being worked on ...

    This looks like their their attempt to do "big-little" core layout, as ARM does. The strategy is entirely for power savings.
    Reply
  • N_tell
    bit_user said:
    I think they're aimed at ultra-light tablet/laptop convertibles that have no fans. So, you'd want to compare it to the old M-series, I believe.

    https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/series/185341/8th-generation-intel-core-m-processors.html
    Still...
    Reply
  • bit_user
    joeblowsmynose said:
    This five core processor (or an earlier brother) was spotted quite some time ago somewhere in some benchmark suite or probably just in documentation somewhere -- I thought it just never materialize but looks like its still being worked on ...
    Lakefield is a thing! It's coming to a couple Microsoft Surface models, among others:

    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/microsoft-foldable-surface-2020-android-apps,39719.htmlhttps://www.tomshardware.com/news/intels-first-3d-processors-lakefield-up-close-and-personal-in-the-lenovo-x1-fold-teardownhttps://www.tomshardware.com/news/samsung-galaxy-book-s-flex-ion-specs-price
    Reply
  • rmcrys
    This chips promise and I thing they could sell extremely well, nevertheless Intel sill be selling them at high prices. A lot of devices including the Surface Go 1 could already feature a "Core-M" type of chip instead of pentium types or other chinese devices some celeron or pentium or atom type of devices. But that if Intel did not charge a premium for them, so the core M did not sell.

    Here we're talking about an Atom chip + 1 core "core type" which means it won't be much better than a Core-M but has an updated graphics and better standby consumption. All in all, every brand would better off TDP down AMDs which would perform better, better graphics and just a small hit on battery life, which most people wouldn't mind.
    Reply