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Radeon RX 6900 XT, Ryzen 7 5800X3D Are Available at MSRP

AMD availability and pricing
(Image credit: AMD)

The official AMD online retail pages currently list the Radeon RX 6900 XT and Ryzen 7 5800X3D as available and for sale at their respective MSRPs. They are selling for $999 and $449, respectively. Or you can buy them both, together, for $1,448. The same prices apply in Europe, with the store using a 1:1 USD to EUR conversion.

While visiting the retail pages, we checked that there was stock and successfully added the titular GPU and CPU to a shopping basket before venturing to the checkout. However, adding another identical GPU or CPU to the basket didn't work – so it looks like AMD has smartly limited the shopping cart to stop folk from buying these up in bulk. It is a good move as not many ordinary PC enthusiasts and gamers will need to buy more than one product. However, we don't know what would happen if we completed checkout and revisited the store using the exact checkout details (name, address, and payment card).

Earlier this week, we happily reported that AMD was selling its newest RDNA2 GPUs, and the attractive new Ryzen 7 5800X3D, for MSRPs - at the PAX East expo in Boston. We pondered whether the sales of the reference design Radeon RX 6700 XT, RX 6800 XT, and RX 6900 XT Halo Infinite Edition GPUs, plus the recently released Ryzen 7 5800X3D CPU at the show, at MSRPs, was a sign of things to come. It certainly seems to be playing out that way.

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AMD availability and pricing

(Image credit: Future)
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AMD availability and pricing

(Image credit: Future)

The terrible GPU availability and pricing saga has run for far longer than we care to recount. Moreover, we hope it won't be returning for a third season. The Tom's Hardware GPUs editor looked at the state of the market in some depth mid-week, considering what GPUs are available in reasonable quantities and which are the best bang-per-buck if you wish to read more. The next will be quite telling, so please check back for that.

On the Ryzen 7 5800X3D, this new 3D V-Cache enhanced CPU caused some waves at launch and quickly sold out, with various parties attempting to sell on chips at well over MSRP. We were slightly worried whether AMD had enough of these CPUs in the pipeline, as perhaps it had been taken by surprise by the demand. However, observing the PAX East sales and seeing the wide geographic availability of the 5800X3D direct from AMD has eased those worries.

The AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D is a particular 8C/16T CPU in some regards, with it being a first consumer PC processor with 3D-stacked SRAM technology – for 96MB of L3 cache. Moreover, its existence marks a satisfying gaming performance pinnacle to which users of older AM4 systems can aspire. That is why we feel stocks of this chip must be available and remain available for some time. The other note is that the Ryzen 7 5800X3D is a good product for its MSRP. Still, the silly post-launch pricing completely ruined it as a sensible proposition (against both AMD and Intel alternatives) to extend your AM4 system's working/gaming life.

Mark Tyson
Mark Tyson

Mark Tyson is a Freelance News Writer at Tom's Hardware US. He enjoys covering the full breadth of PC tech; from business and semiconductor design to products approaching the edge of reason.

  • waltc3
    Yep, it's true, both are selling at MSRP @ the US AMD store. I just bought a 6900XT...I much prefer the 10.5" card length of the AMD model to ~13" lengths of some of the other AIB 6900 XTs that are selling within $100 of the AMD MSRP 6900XTs on Newegg. They are mostly too long for my case. I have a 3900X and play at 4k, so I'm not sure what I will gain from a 5800X3d, and I'm still deciding on the CPU. Probably I will keep the 3900X for a while. 6700 XT is now going to the wife on receipt of this monster, and she said, "That's great! What is a 6700 XT?" bless her sweet pea-pickin' heart...;)
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    I find it more disturbing that AMD has essentially horded this chip, and others, to stock in their own store, providing a higher profit margin for themselves while ensuring customers pay a higher price than they would at retail.

    The 5950X, for example, $540-$550 at retailers, but out of stock because AMD hasn't shipped them more, but $800 on their own store.
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    I find it more disturbing that AMD has essentially horded this chip, and others, to stock in their own store, providing a higher profit margin for themselves while ensuring customers pay a higher price than they would at retail.

    The 5950X, for example, $540-$550 at retailers, but out of stock because AMD hasn't shipped them more, but $800 on their own store.

    I think they should sell first through their own store.

    Internet resellers add very little or no value compared to a direct sale from the manufacturer.

    At least if AMD is gouging me I know the reason and cause and can make my decisions based on how I feel about that. If third party prices are abusive I don't really know if it is them or AMD.

    If AMD is taking the profits then the actual design, production and availability of a valued product is being properly rewarded.
    Reply
  • rluker5
    waltc3 said:
    Yep, it's true, both are selling at MSRP @ the US AMD store. I just bought a 6900XT...I much prefer the 10.5" card length of the AMD model to ~13" lengths of some of the other AIB 6900 XTs that are selling within $100 of the AMD MSRP 6900XTs on Newegg. They are mostly too long for my case. I have a 3900X and play at 4k, so I'm not sure what I will gain from a 5800X3d, and I'm still deciding on the CPU. Probably I will keep the 3900X for a while. 6700 XT is now going to the wife on receipt of this monster, and she said, "That's great! What is a 6700 XT?" bless her sweet pea-pickin' heart...;)
    That 6900XT is going to give you 99% of the improvement at 4k that you would get if you got both.
    I spent $1300 on my bargain 3080 early last year and saw the prices sit above that for a long time. Was considering $1500 6900XTs at the time, but I got what I got and have gravitated towards games it does well in.
    Glad to see prices go down and with luck you got a better bin than was available a while ago. Should be a strong card for a good while. I hope the prices don't spike with the new gens, but that is what they have been doing for the last couple.
    Reply
  • SunMaster
    Well, that's certainly going to cause a pretty sudden reaction at all dealers with overpriced stock. It also means if they'll get rid of it they'll sell it below msrp.

    I'm pretty sure the sudden fall of GPU prices are cause by these GPUS not selling - in useful numbers - at the price level they were at.

    Expect to buy both Nvidia and AMD cards below 'msrp' pretty soon.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    Laws of supply and demand dictate that when supply is thin, demand per available widget goes up, driving prices up, as customers compete for the limited supply. When supply is plentiful, demand does not increase, of course, but prices have to fall, or they couldn't sell off the increased supply. The lower the prices go, the higher demand is created when supply is plentiful. Suckers like me, for instance, who wouldn't touch a 6900XT for $2k, will jump; all over it at the MSRP of $1k, especially shipped straight from AMD...;)

    In December 2020, I had planned to by a 6800XT for $650 from AMD...but I never got the chance because they've been out of stock at the AMD store since--and still are out of stock. When I finally got into the queue at the AMD store, amazingly after forecasting a wait of more than an hour, I actually got in, but only the 6900XT and the 6700XT were available, of course.

    Anyway, looks like I have a buy through the US AMD store regular, even though I have an AMD order number/invoice and a receipt for the money from PayPal, I'm somewhat bothered by the fact that the AMD store has not asked me how I wanted it shipped! Now, I ordered yesterday, on a Saturday, so maybe they will email me on Monday and ask me. I hope so, but I am bothered by seeing nothing in the ordering process asking me about shipping thus far. They don't work on the weekends? That is kind of strange, imo. Last stuff I ordered from them was an AMD 50th Ann 5700XT, in July, 2019, and that went without a hitch. We'll see what happens. I'll try and return to the thread when I find out.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    Alas, the 58000X3D appears to have sold out, again, as I just looked a few minutes ago.
    Reply
  • Sleepy_Hollowed
    They literally did the thing I've been saying, which is implement strong bot controls, and ordering queue, this late into the problem.

    I get that it's an international store problem with a lot of systems for point of sale that make it really complicated to make and test, but phew, we had lay-away in the 90s in brick and mortar.

    All this being said, I wonder if this is only because these were not selling at ridiculous prices for a bit, or because they're selling what's left before a refresh and not so good miner times, they've been having some serious issues due to geo political and gas prices (which I celebrate to be honest).
    Reply
  • VforV
    This is IRRELEVANT for most of the countries on the globe, except the few they have a direct buy AMD store... meh. :cautious:

    So this is (good ?) news only for those few...

    Anyway, I could not care less about it now, because this is not the time for me to buy a new GPU. I rather save more and buy RDNA3 in 4-6 months. But I do not like the fact that even then I won't have a direct buy option from AMD.

    My 6700 XT is enough until then. A $1000 6900 XT (or equivalent nvidia GPU, for that matter) will get absolutely destroyed by a similar tier RDNA3/Lovelace or absolutely ridiculed by a $500-600 GPU with the same performance.

    I don't want to be that fool 6 months from now. It's one thing to buy the halo GPU at the start of the generation and use it for 2 years and completely different to buy it at the end.
    Reply
  • KyaraM
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    I find it more disturbing that AMD has essentially horded this chip, and others, to stock in their own store, providing a higher profit margin for themselves while ensuring customers pay a higher price than they would at retail.

    The 5950X, for example, $540-$550 at retailers, but out of stock because AMD hasn't shipped them more, but $800 on their own store.
    That's being "consumer-oriented", didn't you know?/s
    Reply