Raijintek Teases GeForce RTX 4090-Compatible Fanless Cooler

Raijintek
(Image credit: Raijintek)

FanlessTech has published the first images of Raijintek's upcoming Morpheus 8069 fanless cooler for high-end graphics cards. Specifically, it is compatible with AMD's Radeon RX 6700/6800/6900, Nvidia's GeForce RTX 3080/3090, and even Nvidia's current flagship GeForce RTX 4090

The Raijintek Morpheus 8069 can dissipate up to 360W passively (provided that there are decent and properly adjusted airflows inside the chassis) and considerably more when equipped with a few fans. 360W is enough to cool down some of the best graphics cards around, such as AMD's Radeon RX 6900 XT and Nvidia's GeForce RTX 3090 Ti working at stock clocks. However, for the top-of-the-range GeForce RTX 4090, one will need to add a couple of 120-mm fans to the cooling system.

(Image credit: Raijintek)

Raijintek's new Morpheus 8069 resembles its predecessor, the Morpheus 8057, down to small details. However, it has a different mounting mechanism to gain compatibility with the latest graphics cards. In addition, the cooling system features a nickel-plated copper base, 12 6-mm heat pipes, and 129 aluminum fins. It weighs 515 grams without the optional 120-mm coolers, but with a couple of Raijintek's 120-mm fans (at ~100 grams per unit), the weight increases to around 715 grams. But it's still below the weight of most stock coolers used for high-end graphics cards today. 

(Image credit: Raijintek)

In addition to the cooler itself, thermal pads, screws, washers, mounting frames, and brackets for fans, the Morpheus 8069 bundle will also include copper heatsinks for voltage regulating modules of reference AMD Radeon RX 6700/6800/6900 and Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080/3090/4090 graphics boards. Meanwhile, images (see the gallery below the story) containing a backplate with a non-Raijintek brand imply that the company might not include a backplate in the package.  

(Image credit: Raijintek)

Historically, Raijintek was among the companies focused primarily on fanless (passive) cooling solutions. However, as CPUs and GPUs gained power consumption and increased heat dissipation in recent years, the manufacturer expanded its lineup with traditional air coolers and all-in-one liquid cooling systems. Nonetheless, Raijintek clearly remembers its roots, and the Morpheus 8069 is an excellent example. 

It remains to be seen whether the Morpheus 8069 will be able to cool down Nvidia's upcoming GeForce RTX 4080 without fans as well as AMD's forthcoming Radeon RX 7000-series boards passively, but at least the unit can be used with existing graphics boards. Even a quiet GeForce RTX 3090 sounds seems alluring. 

Raijintek plans to formally introduce the Morpheus 8069 on November 1. There is no word on the pricing of the upcoming passive cooler for modern graphics cards, but its predecessor (for AMD's Radeon RX 5000 and Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2000-series) sells at Amazon for $105 (opens in new tab).

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • blacknemesist
    Ok but why would we do this? Warranty is voided immediately and coolers on the 4090 and top 3xxx are already massive.
    Reply
  • escksu
    I wouldn't exactly call it fanless. You will still need extremely good airflow in the case in order to omit the fans. I am talking air flow akin to a rackmount server unit.
    Reply
  • toxicplume
    blacknemesist said:
    Warranty is voided immediately
    Is it?
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    toxicplume said:
    Is it?
    Not in the USA, no. You can disassemble and re-assemble things as many times as you want, as long as you don't damage anything in the process. If you do damage something, that is when you do void the warranty. It's a subtle, but important distinction.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    -Fran- said:
    Not in the USA, no. You can disassemble and re-assemble things as many times as you want, as long as you don't damage anything in the process. If you do damage something, that is when you do void the warranty. It's a subtle, but important distinction.

    Regards.
    While this is the case here in the US, it is then very easy for the manufacturer to claim any damage was done as a result of the end user.
    Double edged sword there, you can do it without voiding your warranty, but you raise the risk of the manufacturer saying "no"

    As for the product, its an interesting idea when considered as a bare bones cooler instead of fanless. It has the option to add fans, so you can slap whatever models you want on there.
    I would be interested to see a comparison between a third party custom card, and one of these with some noctua (etc) fans on it, for thermals and noise.
    Reply
  • gggplaya
    -Fran- said:
    Not in the USA, no. You can disassemble and re-assemble things as many times as you want, as long as you don't damage anything in the process. If you do damage something, that is when you do void the warranty. It's a subtle, but important distinction.

    Regards.

    Warranty covers manufacturer "DEFECTS." If anything you do CAUSES failure of the product, then the warranty is void. If you install a 3rd party heatsink, and the memory overheats, that's your fault and shouldn't be warrantied. The manufacturer has a plausible case to deny your warranty.

    If you leave a product unmodified, it's much harder for the manufacturer to deny the warranty.
    Reply
  • junglist724
    Took them so long to release this that stock coolers already make it irrelevant.
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    gggplaya said:
    Warranty covers manufacturer "DEFECTS." If anything you do CAUSES failure of the product, then the warranty is void. If you install a 3rd party heatsink, and the memory overheats, that's your fault and shouldn't be warrantied. The manufacturer has a plausible case to deny your warranty.

    If you leave a product unmodified, it's much harder for the manufacturer to deny the warranty.
    Not necessarily. Strictly speaking and in good faith, yes. If you swap the HS (in this case, with the 4090) and something overheats because you did something wrong, then you void the warranty, but if you re-assemble the card and use stock components (paste, thermal pads), you can still claim warranty and they can't deny it if you don't mention what you did. It's the same-ish with CPU overclocking.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • newtechldtech
    It looks like any 3 slots GPU cooler from ASUS or Gigabyte minus the fans . same huge heatsink and same pipes. and it will heat up very fast forcing the GPU to throttle .
    Reply
  • wr3zzz
    Per the article itself the cooler still needs to add fans to use on a 4090. Does Tomshardware not employ editors anymore? Or is the site now own by Taboola?
    Reply