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BenQ VZ2470H 24-inch AMVA Monitor Review

Grayscale Tracking And Gamma Response

Our grayscale and gamma tests are described in detail here.

The VZ2470H's Standard and sRGB picture modes are identical in every measurement. It appears that a little extra blue has been added to the white point to give room for the blue light adjustments to have an effect. In the Blue Light mode you can reduce that color for a warmer presentation and save those adjustments to four memory slots. Our recommendation is to perform a calibration in the User mode, which is precisely what we did.

In its default state, User mode is far too blue for our taste. Stick with Standard or sRGB if you want a fire-and-forget preset. Otherwise, User is the only way to get access to the RGB sliders.

Grayscale can be dialed in with good precision thanks to RGB sliders that have 100-step resolution. Our only nitpick is that they start at their max values so you will lose a tiny bit of contrast by calibrating. Luckily it's a minimal sacrifice and the final result is still over 3000:1. Tracking looks quite good after adjustment, and even more so considering the VZ's low price.

Here is our comparison group.

These are pretty typical numbers for a general-use display. An average error of less than three DeltaE means you won't see any problems in real-world content. The VZ2470H goes just a bit blue at higher brightness levels but we still consider it very good without calibration.

Cutting the average error to less than half its original value is a worthwhile pursuit in our opinion. As we said earlier, there is very little difference in contrast. While we realize the VZ2470H is not likely to be used in color-critical applications, an optimized image is still always desirable.

Gamma Response

Gamma tracking can't really look any better than this. The tiny aberrations at 10, 60 and 80 percent are completely invisible in both test patterns and content. Accuracy like this only enhances the VZ's excellent contrast.

Calibration hurt our gamma results a little but it's still far from a visible issue. Levels from 60 percent and up are a tad dark but it doesn't have an impact on overall image quality.

Here is our comparison group again.

A .17 range of values indicates very tight tracking even with the small performance hit post-calibration. Looking at the entire group of displays, there is almost no difference from best to worst.

We calculate gamma deviation by simply expressing the difference from 2.2 as a percentage.

The same thing isn't quite true when looking at the average value result. The top two screens (which includes the VZ2470H) are pretty much right on the 2.2 line. The rest track well but are a little under or over the mark. The BL3200PT finishes last because it runs a touch dark. In other words its average is over 2.2.

  • perishedinflames
    What's the difference between this and GW2470H? Is it just the design or is it more than that?
    Reply
  • none12345
    Only 60hz, no dvi?, no displayport? Wouldnt even consider it.

    Not to mention the ugly white, or the off center stand, that will make it more wobbly. And no vesa mount if you want to use your own stand.

    Just EWW all around. And its not even budget at 209, way to high for 60hz.
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    It's a real shame that manufacturers forgot about 120-200Hz on 1080p 21-25° panels. Gaming monitores doesn't need to be 27" 1440p to actually get those benefits.
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    For now im getting a 21° Dell Trinitron CRT.

    1600x1200 85Hz master race with 0ms response times. 0ms input lag :)
    Reply
  • Max_x2
    What's the difference between this and GW2470H? Is it just the design or is it more than that?

    My bet is that the only difference is the design. If you're in the market for a great, cheap all-around monitor, I'd say buy the GW2470H. Had my GW2450 for about 3 years, and I'm still in love with it. The color accuracy is unmatched except maybe for monitors worth 4-5 times the price, and I also enjoy it for some casual gaming (racing simulators mostly in my case).

    Here's a review of mine: http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/content/benq_gw2450hm.htm . Anyway, what I can tell you is that this was my 1st BenQ monitor, but sure won't be the last. The quality is amazing.
    Reply
  • basroil
    Looks like another ( Mod edit: Keep it clean....)benq monitor that looks fine on paper but will be troubled with quickly degrading screens and wonky controls that were outdated a decade ago

    *edit* anort3, I used no words that would not be acceptable in a PG rating. It was certainly far cleaner than some comments by others including mods!
    Reply
  • Max_x2
    You do know that they own auoptronic, which supplies panels for a lot of displays, right? Also, their parts are in a lot of other companies monitors, beside the actual panel.
    Reply
  • ozicom
    I've been trying to upgrade my display to 4K and i'm sure most people will try to do this while 4K is not a dream anymore. Apple and Dell and i think some other manufacturers start to produce 5K and more and now we're looking at a FHD monitor. I know mainstream means low price but buying a FHD monitor with no added options looks dummy. So let's try to push brands and manufacturers to make better for less.
    Reply
  • darcotech
    It would be nice if you note that this is sponsored article.
    Reply
  • atwspoon
    It would be nice if you note that this is sponsored article.
    How does one note that fact?
    Reply