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BenQ VZ2470H 24-inch AMVA Monitor Review

Brightness And Contrast

To read about our monitor tests in-depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test Monitors and TVs.  Brightness and Contrast testing is covered on page two.

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

With AMVA monitors being relatively rare in the marketplace, it's taken us a while to actually create a comparison group solely made up of them. The VZ2470H is the seventh such product to come to our labs. Most recently, we checked out the Acer Z35 curved screen. Also in that category is the HP Envy 34c. The 32-inch flat panel format is represented by Asus' PB328Q and BenQ's BL3200PT, which share the same panel part. Rounding out the group is Philip's Ultra HD BDM4065UC 40-inch screen.

BenQ claims a max output of 250cd/m2 and the VZ2470H easily exceeds that level. While not as bright as some displays it offers more than enough light for any task. You might not find it as useful at an outdoor location setting but it has sufficient power to work well in an office.

Black levels are AMVA's strong suit and all of the displays here can render them superbly. While the Philips is likely to remain our leader for the foreseeable future, the VZ2470H manages to be the best of the rest. Even at the maximum backlight setting, you can't tell it's turned on when displaying a full-black field pattern.

That black level keeps the BenQ at second place in the maximum contrast test. The Philips is pretty much in another universe, but 3423.7:1 is far greater than any IPS or TN screen we've tested.

Uncalibrated – Minimum Backlight Level

Turning the backlight down to its minimum yields a very dark 22.3096cd/m2. Even with all the lights off that's too dim for our taste. Turning brightness up to 11 (Spinal Tap fans take note) will result in a more-usable 50cd/m2.

The black level is nearly immeasurable at this setting. And it's only a hair higher than the record-setting Philips. This is seriously low.

Contrast remains consistent throughout the backlight's adjustment range with a negligible change from bottom to top, which represents fantastic performance. In practice, any of the displays here will render a superior image to a TN or IPS monitor.

After Calibration To 200cd/m2

The VZ2470H stays in second place and gives away nothing to the Philips after calibration.

We were concerned that the RGB adjustments, which start at the top of their ranges, would reduce contrast although there's plenty to spare here. Our fears were unfounded as the final result is visually indistinguishable from the VZ's default state. Calibration can only help this monitor though it looks great out of the box as well.

ANSI Contrast Ratio

The panel quality here is very impressive at this price point. When ANSI and sequential contrast values are this close it means solid engineering and quality control are in play. As one of the least-expensive monitors we've tested to-date, saying we're impressed would be an understatement.

  • perishedinflames
    What's the difference between this and GW2470H? Is it just the design or is it more than that?
    Reply
  • none12345
    Only 60hz, no dvi?, no displayport? Wouldnt even consider it.

    Not to mention the ugly white, or the off center stand, that will make it more wobbly. And no vesa mount if you want to use your own stand.

    Just EWW all around. And its not even budget at 209, way to high for 60hz.
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    It's a real shame that manufacturers forgot about 120-200Hz on 1080p 21-25° panels. Gaming monitores doesn't need to be 27" 1440p to actually get those benefits.
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    For now im getting a 21° Dell Trinitron CRT.

    1600x1200 85Hz master race with 0ms response times. 0ms input lag :)
    Reply
  • Max_x2
    What's the difference between this and GW2470H? Is it just the design or is it more than that?

    My bet is that the only difference is the design. If you're in the market for a great, cheap all-around monitor, I'd say buy the GW2470H. Had my GW2450 for about 3 years, and I'm still in love with it. The color accuracy is unmatched except maybe for monitors worth 4-5 times the price, and I also enjoy it for some casual gaming (racing simulators mostly in my case).

    Here's a review of mine: http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/content/benq_gw2450hm.htm . Anyway, what I can tell you is that this was my 1st BenQ monitor, but sure won't be the last. The quality is amazing.
    Reply
  • basroil
    Looks like another ( Mod edit: Keep it clean....)benq monitor that looks fine on paper but will be troubled with quickly degrading screens and wonky controls that were outdated a decade ago

    *edit* anort3, I used no words that would not be acceptable in a PG rating. It was certainly far cleaner than some comments by others including mods!
    Reply
  • Max_x2
    You do know that they own auoptronic, which supplies panels for a lot of displays, right? Also, their parts are in a lot of other companies monitors, beside the actual panel.
    Reply
  • ozicom
    I've been trying to upgrade my display to 4K and i'm sure most people will try to do this while 4K is not a dream anymore. Apple and Dell and i think some other manufacturers start to produce 5K and more and now we're looking at a FHD monitor. I know mainstream means low price but buying a FHD monitor with no added options looks dummy. So let's try to push brands and manufacturers to make better for less.
    Reply
  • darcotech
    It would be nice if you note that this is sponsored article.
    Reply
  • atwspoon
    It would be nice if you note that this is sponsored article.
    How does one note that fact?
    Reply