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BenQ VZ2470H 24-inch AMVA Monitor Review

Our Verdict

BenQ's VZ2470H is a value choice for sure but it doesn't cut corners. A slick design, solid build and accurate color plus deep contrast, courtesy of a cutting-edge AMVA panel, mean you'll sacrifice nothing and spend comfortably less than $200. Highly recommended.

For

  • High style
  • White chassis
  • Zero-bezel design
  • High contrast AMVA panel
  • Color accurate
  • Responsive
  • Low input lag

Against

  • No height, swivel or portrait adjustments
  • No speakers
  • No USB

Introduction

The vast majority of our monitor reviews focus on technology and improvements in image quality, and don't really take style or feel into account. Evolution usually means premium pricing but when we can highlight exceptional value, we do. Enter the BenQ VZ2470H; a general-use display that incorporates exceptional image quality courtesy of a high-contrast AMVA panel, high style and a low price.

While every manufacturer has its own distinct product design, most desktop displays are hard to tell apart once you stand back and are unable to see the logo. The now-familiar black chassis is a staple feature in nearly every monitor that comes into our lab. Occasionally we see an attempt at something different like Philips' all-white BDM4065UC. In that same vein, BenQ has created a white chassis for the VZ and shows extra attention to detail by providing white cables and even a white power supply brick. Topping it off is a zero-bezel panel (Edge-To-Edge) that creates an image that essentially floats in front of the user.

Specifications

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The VZ2470H's unique styling is bound to attract buyers but we think users should also take a close look at the AMVA panel part used here. It's made by AU Optronics and boasts a native and unenhanced contrast ratio of over 3000:1 as confirmed by our measurements. AMVA works on the same principle as IPS but adds a superior light valve to the mix. That means when the crystals are oriented to block the backlight, they prevent nearly all transmission of light resulting in significantly lower black levels than other LCD technologies.

Speaking of the backlight, it's of the Zero-flicker variety, which does away with pulse-width modulation in favor of a constant current. Most users don't notice flicker but for the small number that do, this is a welcome feature that serves to reduce eye fatigue.

Despite its relative uniqueness and spectacular image quality, the price of admission is comfortably under $200. FHD resolution is part of the reason for that but at 24 inches; the lower pixel density isn't as big a deal as it would be in a 27-inch screen. Otherwise, we can't see that any corners have been cut. Build quality is superb with a monolithic design that makes the base and upright an integral part of the panel. This means no height, swivel or portrait adjustment and unfortunately, no VESA mount either.

But you get the benefit of BenQ's usual high color accuracy, full-featured menu system and at least in our sample, no light bleed or other screen anomalies. The value here is pretty good and we're impressed with the package at first glance. We have yet to be disappointed by any BenQ display so let's see how the VZ2470H fares in our benchmark tests.

  • perishedinflames
    What's the difference between this and GW2470H? Is it just the design or is it more than that?
    Reply
  • none12345
    Only 60hz, no dvi?, no displayport? Wouldnt even consider it.

    Not to mention the ugly white, or the off center stand, that will make it more wobbly. And no vesa mount if you want to use your own stand.

    Just EWW all around. And its not even budget at 209, way to high for 60hz.
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    It's a real shame that manufacturers forgot about 120-200Hz on 1080p 21-25° panels. Gaming monitores doesn't need to be 27" 1440p to actually get those benefits.
    Reply
  • Nintendork
    For now im getting a 21° Dell Trinitron CRT.

    1600x1200 85Hz master race with 0ms response times. 0ms input lag :)
    Reply
  • Max_x2
    What's the difference between this and GW2470H? Is it just the design or is it more than that?

    My bet is that the only difference is the design. If you're in the market for a great, cheap all-around monitor, I'd say buy the GW2470H. Had my GW2450 for about 3 years, and I'm still in love with it. The color accuracy is unmatched except maybe for monitors worth 4-5 times the price, and I also enjoy it for some casual gaming (racing simulators mostly in my case).

    Here's a review of mine: http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/content/benq_gw2450hm.htm . Anyway, what I can tell you is that this was my 1st BenQ monitor, but sure won't be the last. The quality is amazing.
    Reply
  • basroil
    Looks like another ( Mod edit: Keep it clean....)benq monitor that looks fine on paper but will be troubled with quickly degrading screens and wonky controls that were outdated a decade ago

    *edit* anort3, I used no words that would not be acceptable in a PG rating. It was certainly far cleaner than some comments by others including mods!
    Reply
  • Max_x2
    You do know that they own auoptronic, which supplies panels for a lot of displays, right? Also, their parts are in a lot of other companies monitors, beside the actual panel.
    Reply
  • ozicom
    I've been trying to upgrade my display to 4K and i'm sure most people will try to do this while 4K is not a dream anymore. Apple and Dell and i think some other manufacturers start to produce 5K and more and now we're looking at a FHD monitor. I know mainstream means low price but buying a FHD monitor with no added options looks dummy. So let's try to push brands and manufacturers to make better for less.
    Reply
  • darcotech
    It would be nice if you note that this is sponsored article.
    Reply
  • atwspoon
    It would be nice if you note that this is sponsored article.
    How does one note that fact?
    Reply