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Corsair Xeneon 32QHD165 32-inch QHD 165 Hz Gaming Monitor Review: Color For Days

Big screen, huge color gamut.

Corsair Xeneon 32QHD165
(Image: © Corsair)

To compare the 32QHD165’s performance, we’ve rounded up a collection of 32- and 27-inch gaming monitors. At the top of the speed scale is Samsung’s 240 Hz C32G75T. Then, we have the Razer Raptor 27, Acer XB273U-NV, Gigabyte G32QC and Aorus FI32U. The Samsung and Gigabyte screens use VA panels, while the rest have IPS technology.

Pixel Response and Input Lag

Click here to read up on our pixel response and input lag testing procedures.

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Corsair Xeneon 32QHD165

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Corsair Xeneon 32QHD165

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The 32QHD165 takes 6ms to refresh a full field white pattern, typical performance for a 165 Hz monitor. It is a tad slower than the other screens in our total lag test. Our result includes the lag produced by the mouse, so it is a more real-world number than the Bodnar test. Typically, if you want lower lag, you need more Hertz. But the Aorus FI32U is a standout with just 26ms at 144 Hz. The Corsair won’t disappoint a casual gamer with its performance and frame rates, but extremely skilled players might need a snappier display.

Viewing Angles

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The 32QHD165’s viewing angles are excellent, with only a tiny reduction in brightness at 45 degrees to the side. There is a visible color shift to blue, but detail is equally clear as you move off-axis. This is better than typical IPS screens of today. The top view is darkened by around 50% and the color shifts to red/green with a reduction in detail.

Screen Uniformity

To learn how we measure screen uniformity, click here.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Our 32QHD165 sample showed some additional brightness at the bottom of the screen. The top and middle zones were visibly uniform, but a slight glow could be seen along the lowest edge. It only appeared in actual content that was very dark, but did not distract from gameplay. There were no specific hotspots visible, nor was there edge bleed. Color was perfectly uniform.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.
  • closs.sebastien
    32" and less than 4k...
    ok, for old people who are half-blind..
    = 5mm-pixel
    Reply
  • thepersonwithaface45
    Wow, was really excited at first but then I remembered QHD isn't 4k
    Reply
  • Jake Hall
    closs.sebastien said:
    32" and less than 4k...
    ok, for old people who are half-blind..
    = 5mm-pixel
    Yeah, I didn't think about pixel density when I got my monitor, but it's not really that bad. You have to be unreasonably close to the screen.
    Reply