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Aorus FO48U 4K OLED Gaming Monitor Review: Contrast Beyond Comprehension

Phenomenal contrast and color accuracy

Aorus FO48U 4K OLED
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Aorus)

Our HDR benchmarking uses Portrait Displays’ Calman software. To learn about our HDR testing, see our breakdown of how we test PC monitors.

To see the best HDR quality possible, a monitor needs two things: wide dynamic range and the ability to address the brightness of each pixel in the array on a frame-by-frame basis. LCD monitors can approximate this with zone dimming, but even the latest Mini LED screen can’t compete with an OLED panel that can manipulate every one of its 8.3 megapixels. The FO48U may not be as bright as an LCD, but its HDR is on another level entirely.

HDR Brightness and Contrast

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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The FO48U is a major step up in brightness from the AW5520QF. As impressed as we are with the Alienware, the Aorus looks much better in HDR mode. With a peak output just under 400 nits, it matches most other HDR computer monitors in brightness. The other screens are 1000 nits or more and deliver great HDR, especially in brightly lit rooms. But the OLED’s black levels are truly something else. We couldn’t measure them, so the FO48U’s contrast is theoretically infinite.

Grayscale, EOTF and Color

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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

We measured all three of the FO48U’s HDR modes to determine the best one for gaming and entertainment. Though they are nearly the same, there are some subtle differences. All have near-perfect grayscale tracking, so comparisons there are a wash. The mode called HDR has a luminance curve that starts a bit too dark, then smoothly transitions to tone-mapping at 65%. The Movie and Game modes are a little lighter in the mid-tones.

In the gamut tests, all three modes are slightly oversaturated in the middle targets. The Game mode hits more of its targets and is the one we ultimately chose, based on real-world observation. All three presets look great, but Game has just a tad more depth, thanks to its more accurate gamut tracking.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.
  • mihen
    Already able to see some very minor burn in after playing a game for 10 hours that has a fixed UI. Only visible on dark gray screens. I was at 100% brightness =/, went down to 30% as suggested by others.
    Reply
  • saunupe1911
    Why would I even consider this over a 48 inch LG C1 at $1299....$1596 with 2 year burn protection?
    Reply
  • deesider
    For people who use this size of monitor (or TV), how far away do you sit from it?

    I just can't imagine sitting at a desk with a 48" screen. I use a 27" as my main and prefer to sit at least 1 metre away.
    Reply
  • Bryman
    deesider said:
    For people who use this size of monitor (or TV), how far away do you sit from it?

    I just can't imagine sitting at a desk with a 48" screen. I use a 27" as my main and prefer to sit at least 1 metre away.
    I sit about 38 to 44" away on my LG c1 when using for gaming/pc and 48" when watching TV
    Desk is 33" deep
    Reply
  • larsv8
    deesider said:
    For people who use this size of monitor (or TV), how far away do you sit from it?

    I just can't imagine sitting at a desk with a 48" screen. I use a 27" as my main and prefer to sit at least 1 metre away.

    If you check my sig to the pcpartpicker build I had a custom desk built to place my 48 incher further away.

    It sits about 42 inches away, but its wall mounted so a little bit closer.
    Reply
  • Spike_xps720
    deesider said:
    For people who use this size of monitor (or TV), how far away do you sit from it?

    I just can't imagine sitting at a desk with a 48" screen. I use a 27" as my main and prefer to sit at least 1 metre away.
    I have Acer Predator CG437K 43" monitor and I am sitting 33" from it. I love this monitor. All 4K details are bigger and gaming experience is great.
    Reply
  • rdmetz
    mihen said:
    Already able to see some very minor burn in after playing a game for 10 hours that has a fixed UI. Only visible on dark gray screens. I was at 100% brightness =/, went down to 30% as suggested by others.
    That's just image retention no oled is going to burn in after 10 hours. It will go away with varied content.

    I've gamed for 1000's of hours (some at 100% for hdr the rest at 80%) on my 2019 lg c9 and have zero signs of permanent burn in.

    Almost all panels that exist today are just LG display panels and for the most part should have similar burn in protections.

    If you're talking about a panel pre 2018 then yes burn in was a bit more likely and even I, with the same game I've put thousands of hours in on my 2019 c9, saw permanent burn in on my 2016 after just 3 months and maybe 300 hours of said game.

    Today its very very difficult to burn in your screen unless your absolutely careless or are purposefully disabling protections built in and enabled by default.
    Reply
  • rdmetz
    deesider said:
    For people who use this size of monitor (or TV), how far away do you sit from it?

    I just can't imagine sitting at a desk with a 48" screen. I use a 27" as my main and prefer to sit at least 1 metre away.

    I game on a 65" C9 OLED and while I have a desk and keyboard mouse setup about 24" in front of it (it's wall mounted) but I do most of my gaming about 4 feet from it using a controller.

    My vision isn't great and honestly only with a large screen and pretty much "immersed" can I actually stay competitive in the fps type games I like to play. Seeing "deep" into the picture is hard for me unless my vision is pretty much dominated by screen. I've grown quite accustomed to it and just make sure any hud elements are pulled in as close to center as possible so I don't have to move my eyes too much.
    Reply
  • Friesiansam
    [URL='https://www.tomshardware.com/uk/author/christian-eberle']Christian Eberle[/URL] said:


    This is thanks to its ability to shut off individual pixels on the fly to create an infinitely low black level. The word infinitely is not an exaggeration.
    It is an exaggeration. To be infinitely black it would have to be invisible, emitting or reflecting absolutely no light whatsoever. Even Vanta Black still reflects a very tiny amount of light.
    Reply
  • mihen
    rdmetz said:
    That's just image retention no oled is going to burn in after 10 hours. It will go away with varied content.

    I've gamed for 1000's of hours (some at 100% for hdr the rest at 80%) on my 2019 lg c9 and have zero signs of permanent burn in.

    Almost all panels that exist today are just LG display panels and for the most part should have similar burn in protections.

    If you're talking about a panel pre 2018 then yes burn in was a bit more likely and even I, with the same game I've put thousands of hours in on my 2019 c9, saw permanent burn in on my 2016 after just 3 months and maybe 300 hours of said game.

    Today its very very difficult to burn in your screen unless your absolutely careless or are purposefully disabling protections built in and enabled by default.

    Thanks, I was worried when I noticed it.
    Reply