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Aorus FO48U 4K OLED Gaming Monitor Review: Contrast Beyond Comprehension

Phenomenal contrast and color accuracy

Aorus FO48U 4K OLED
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Aorus)

The FO48U’s Green picture mode is a true set and forget option. And it’s the default mode, which makes things that much easier. Just set brightness to taste, and you’re ready to rock.

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking

Our grayscale and gamma tests use Calman calibration software from Portrait Displays. We describe our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

The FO48U measures incredibly well out of the box. Grayscale tracking shows no visible errors with every value under 1 Delta E (errors are generally considered invisible to the naked eye if they’re under 3dE). Gamma, meanwhile, tracks the 2.2 line almost perfectly. If you’re measuring your own FO48U, or any OLED, make sure to use 25% window patterns. This overcomes the variable brightness inherent to all self-illuminating technologies.

In the sRGB picture mode, we saw some green errors in steps above 50% brightness. Gamma tracks reasonably well, but the green tint is visible in content. We consider this mode usable but just barely. After a few back-and-forth comparisons in-game, we stuck with the Green mode.

Comparisons

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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The FO48U delivers professional-level accuracy without calibration, and so does the Acer CG437K. After all the monitors are calibrated, the Aorus is in fifth place, thanks to the group’s very high quality. Any score less than 1dE in this test should be considered reference-level.

The gamma results are similar. Though the FO48U is mid-pack, it’s only because the entire field is so good. All of the monitors in the group show excellent performance here.

Color Gamut Accuracy

Our color gamut and volume testing use Portrait Displays’ Calman software. For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here.

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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

The FO48U’s default color gamut chart is nothing short of impressive. Every measurement is on its target. Blue shows a tiny bit of oversaturation at the triangle perimeter, but this wasn’t visible in actual content. Again, we’re seeing reference-level accuracy here.

The sRGB mode is very good as well with just a little undersaturation in red, magenta and blue, but these errors do not affect real-world content. If not for the greenish grayscale tracking, sRGB would be reference-level too. The mode is usable, but we ultimately preferred to stick with the FO48U’s full native gamut for both SDR and HDR content.

Comparisons

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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte Aorus FO48U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Only a handful of monitors in our database can match color accuracy with the FO48U. That 1.02dE result is an average of 31 measurements, so this achievement is no small feat. The other screens, particularly the VA panels, also perform well here. The Aorus has certainly pipped its chief competitor, the AW5520QF.

Though the Alienware impressed us at the time with its 94.35% coverage of DCI-P3, the FO48U beats that score significantly. A little bonus blue coupled with full coverage of the other primary colors returns one of the best gamut volume scores we’ve yet recorded: 107.74%. We can’t help but notice it’s almost identical to the coverage of the FV43U, which is a completely different monitor and technology. If you’re looking for an OLED panel for your photo or video editing hardware suite, the FO48U more than qualifies and is far cheaper than a professional monitor.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.