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Intel Xeon E5-2600 v4 Broadwell-EP Review

Additional Benchmarks

Sysbench CPU

Sysbench is a widely used suite that characterizes CPU, memory, file I/O, mutex performance and MySQL performance. We focus on the CPU test, which measures the amount of time required to verify prime numbers in both single- and multi-threaded workloads.

Both Xeon E5-2697 v4-powered servers provide impressive performance, beating most of the competition in the threaded component of this test. But Intel's -2699 v3 spoils the party by reporting a slightly faster result. The v4s fire back, overtaking the Xeon E5-2699 v3 in single-threaded performance, even besting the E5-2643 v3 as well.

Stream

Stream is a relatively simple test developed by Dr. John D. McCalpin. It measures the sustainable memory throughput of a given system in MB/s.

The Intel validation server employs speedy SK hynix DDR4-2400. As such, it leads our bandwidth results. The Xeon E5-2699 v3 employs dual memory controllers, which apparently are not as efficient as what Broadwell-EP brings to bear. They trail, even though they are tested on the same Intel motherboard.

We also tested the Xeon E5-2643 v3 on this board, and it trails significantly. The eight-core die only employs one memory controller, which just can't keep up.

C-Ray 1.1

C-Ray is a raytracing benchmark designed to reside entirely inside of the CPU caches, thus eliminating RAM and disk I/O overhead during the measurement window. The test focuses purely on floating-point performance during rendering and runs on multiple threads.

The -2697 v4s and -2699 v3 are locked in a three-way tie for the lead, while the second-generation E5s fall to the rear. Because this test scales well across multiple threads, the eight-core Xeon E5-2643 v3 is quickly outclassed, despite high clock rates.

7-Zip

7-Zip is open source software that measures compression and decompression performance, which can be a key capability for storage and networking applications.

The only surprise during this test is just how well the 18-core v4s fare compared to the Xeon E5-2699 v3. Meanwhile, all of the second-gen E5s we tested fare dismally, illustrating the benefits of a more modern platform. Most enterprises will be upgrading from Sandy/Ivy Bridge to Broadwell, and this benchmark does a good job of highlighting the type of performance boost to expect.

HardInfo

HardInfo provides granular system information, and includes a suite of six benchmarks that measure CPU performance. It's easily accessible and comes as a standard component in many Ubuntu desktop systems. We include these tests because they allow our Linux brethren to easily run comparative benchmarks.

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The v4s lead in FPU raytracing, but fall behind their predecessors in the Fibonacci test. This generational face-off gets a little more heated during the FPU FTT tests, and the Xeon E5-2687 v4 in Intel's development platform dominates the Cryptohash test.

  • utroz
    Hmm well we know that Broadwell-E chips must be coming very very soon if Intel let this info out.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Wasn't there supposed to be a 4-core 5.0 GHz SKU? Single-thread performance still matters, in many cases.
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    17746082 said:
    Wasn't there supposed to be a 4-core 5.0 GHz SKU? Single-thread performance still matters, in many cases.

    In most server applications it doesn't matter as much as multithreaded performance. If you need single-core strength, getting a consumer chip is actually better, but you probably aren't running a server if single-threaded is your focus.
    Reply
  • PaulyAlcorn
    Wasn't there supposed to be a 4-core 5.0 GHz SKU? Single-thread performance still matters, in many cases.
    I read the rumors on that as well, but nothing official has surfaced as of yet to my knowledge.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    17746141 said:
    17746082 said:
    Wasn't there supposed to be a 4-core 5.0 GHz SKU? Single-thread performance still matters, in many cases.

    In most server applications it doesn't matter as much as multithreaded performance. If you need single-core strength, getting a consumer chip is actually better, but you probably aren't running a server if single-threaded is your focus.
    Try telling that to high-frequency traders. I'm sure they want the reliability features of Xeons (ECC, for example), but the highest clock speed available.

    And the fact that Intel even released low-core high-clock SKUs is an acknowledgement of this continuing need. Clock just not as high as I'd read. With the other specs basically matching the Haswell version, the only difference is ~5% IPC improvement. Seems pretty poor improvement, for a die-shrink.
    Reply
  • firefoxx04
    Would nice to have a quad core xeon that turbos at 4.4ghz just like the 4790k. I had to go with a 4690k when building an autocad system because it only uses one core and needs that core to be fast... this means i have to sacrifice ecc support.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    17746160 said:
    Wasn't there supposed to be a 4-core 5.0 GHz SKU? Single-thread performance still matters, in many cases.
    I read the rumors on that as well, but nothing official has surfaced as of yet to my knowledge.
    On wccftech (not the most reliable source, I know), they claimed:

    Model: Intel Xeon E5-2602 V4
    Cores/threads: 4/8
    Base clock: 5.1 GHz
    Turbo clock: TBD
    L3 Cache: 5 MB
    TDP: 165W

    Given what we know about 2.5 MB/core of L3 Cache, the 5 MB figure sounds suspicious. It's conceivable they could disable some to hit the target TDP, I guess.
    Reply
  • firefoxx04
    We cant get skylake to consistently hit 5ghz... why would a xeon chip suddenly hit 5ghz?
    Reply
  • JamesSneed
    17746312 said:
    We cant get skylake to consistently hit 5ghz... why would a xeon chip suddenly hit 5ghz?

    I'm not saying the 5Ghz rumor is true but Intel has always known which chips can hit higher clocks during certification if the chip is a top end or low end chip cores disabled etc. I'm sure they could cherry pick a few to sell for $$$ if they wanted. Now are they I have no real idea.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    17746312 said:
    We cant get skylake to consistently hit 5ghz... why would a xeon chip suddenly hit 5ghz?
    Well, I was surprised, too.

    There are obviously things you can do in chip design that allow one to reach different timing targets. And I was hoping they might've refined their 14 nm process, since the time the first Broadwells launched. So, I thought, with more TDP headroom afforded by this socket (roughly double what Skylake has to work with), maybe they could do it.

    I thought maybe Intel was addressing some pent-up demand for high clockspeed applications. That said, it seemed particularly odd in Broadwell, given that it generally seems oriented towards lower clockspeed / lower power applications.

    But maybe it was a typo, or even a blatant lie, in order to track down leakers.
    Reply