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Origin PC Millennium: 3-Way SLI And A 4.6 GHz Core i5

Origin PC Millenium: How Does It Stack Up?

At $3,073, our test configuration of the Origin PC Millennium is far from inexpensive. But compared to $7,000+ full-tower systems sporting Intel Extreme Edition processors and dual-GPU graphics cards, the Millennium will put a lot less hurt on your bank account. Meanwhile, it still delivers enough compute performance to make easy work of all but the most arduous processing tasks. Although the Millennium's three GeForce GTX 660 Ti graphics cards could complicate your next upgrade, they deliver enough pixel-pushing power for running today’s games at high settings across three screens, with only occasional frame rate dips in the most demanding titles.

You could build the Millennium up with a trio of GeForce GTX 680s or pair of 690s to push performance even higher, but you’ll certainly pay more in the process. That could be advisable if you want to dedicate a card to Nvidia's PhysX technology, for example, and maintain playability at 5760x1080. Likewise, if you’re setting up a triple-screen system with 120 Hz displays and Nvidia’s 3D Vision glasses, you’ll probably want to invest in a higher-end graphics subsystem to counteract the performance hit that comes with enabling stereoscopy.

Aside from those most extreme cases of gaming on three monitors at the highest available detail settings, this $3,073 Millennium build is an all-around strong performer. The thanks goes not only to the three graphics cards, but also to the overclocked processor and pair of SSDs in RAID 0.

If we were configuring our own Millennium, we'd opt for a larger storage hard drive to make sure there's always enough room to keep the vulnerable boot drive backed up. It costs but a measly $29 to step up from a 1 TB drive to a 2 TB model on the Millennium’s configurator page. Considering the overall price of the system (not to mention current hard drive prices), that's a tiny price to pay to keep from losing your operating system image should one of one of the SSDs goes south.

Matt Safford
Matt began piling up computer experience as a child with his Mattel Aquarius. He built his first PC in the late 1990s and ventured into mild PC modding in the early 2000s. He’s spent the last decade covering emerging technology for Smithsonian, Popular Science, and Consumer Reports, while testing components and PCs for Computer Shopper and Digital Trends. When not writing about tech, he’s often walking—through the streets of New York, over the sheep-dotted hills of Scotland, or just at his treadmill desk at home in front of the 50-inch 4K HDR TV that serves as his PC monitor.
  • DarkSable
    So... no mention of the fact that you're paying for a lot of things you don't need? In it's head-to-head against the DIY rig, I'm noticing a LOT of parts that I wouldn't even consider spending extra money on.

    And they're getting those parts at a discount, so you're paying a lot of money for that tech line.
    Reply
  • EzioAs
    "This system’s starting price is a relatively modest $1,225. For that, you get a Core i3-2120 CPU, an AMD Radeon HD 7750 graphics card, and a 500 GB hard drive."

    Wow, talk about rip off...
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    9539987 said:
    "This system’s starting price is a relatively modest $1,225. For that, you get a Core i3-2120 CPU, an AMD Radeon HD 7750 graphics card, and a 500 GB hard drive."

    Wow, talk about rip off...

    Haha, yeah. That's about what I spent for an i5-3570k and GTX 670. I'll stick with my hand-builts and NOT pay $700 for a tech support who reads from a script.
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    For this much price, i would add another $100 and get the i7-3770k. Those extra 4 cores will come in handy in apps.
    And probably get 2xHD7950. 2 card setups are easier to maintain than 3 card setups (drivers). And the compute capability of GCN is already legendry.
    Reply
  • amuffin
    2 680's would be a better choice.
    Reply
  • DjEaZy
    ... origin haz the good sense to put windows 7 in it...
    Reply
  • danielmunhato
    we just need now is a review with 3 7970´s vs 3 gtx 680 in full hd and beyond.
    Reply
  • Caspase
    mayankleoboy1For this much price, i would add another $100 and get the i7-3770k. Those extra 4 cores will come in handy in apps.And probably get 2xHD7950. 2 card setups are easier to maintain than 3 card setups (drivers). And the compute capability of GCN is already legendry.
    Those extra 4 threads. And I bet at stock it would lose.
    Why aren't temperatures shown? I was curious to see how an ivy @ 4.6 in a mid tower with 3 GPUs with modest cooling would fair...
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    Yeah, why no temperature measurement ? AFAIK, 4.6 on 3570K can get very hot.
    Reply
  • a 3000$ trash like a mac
    Reply