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Origin PC Millennium: 3-Way SLI And A 4.6 GHz Core i5

Benchmark Results: Gaming

It should come as no surprise that the Origin Millennium, with its three GeForce GTX 660 Ti cards, would flat-out smoke our baseline machine from CyberPower with its one previous-gen GeForce GTX 550 Ti (not to mention a price tag less than one-third of Origin PC's). 3DMark 11 certainly drives that point home. In the higher-end Extreme test, which pushes pixels at a resolution of 1080p, the Millennium’s score is nearly 8.5x what the LAN Party Evo is able to deliver. While the performance gap isn’t quite as great when it comes to frame rates, the difference is still quite dramatic.

Running our trio of popular games at 1920x1080 with high detail settings, it’s clear that Origin PC's Millennium has a fair amount of headroom to adopt more demanding resolutions and graphics quality options, while the sub-$1,000 CyberPower system has a tendency to get choppy. Both systems are certainly capable of gaming, but you’ll likely switch off a few things or dial down the settings on the LAN Party Evo. CyberPower's machine serves the purpose we wanted it for, however: to show us what additional performance you get when you spend more.

A couple of important testing notes: We don't include minimum frame rates for Batman: Arkham City because the transitions between scenes in the benchmark tend to make the minimum frame rates artificially low. Minimum frame rates were mostly in the single digits on both systems, but that doesn’t accurately represent what you see when playing the game.

Since the LAN Party Evo’s GeForce GTX 550 Ti card doesn’t support triple-screen Surround gaming, we only have performance numbers at 5760x1080 for Origin PC's system, at least until we're able to create a larger library of test results. But even if you could connect three monitors to the more mainstream system, it's clearly not up to the task of smooth gaming at such extreme resolutions with high settings. On the other hand, the Millennium does pretty well at those extreme settings, although it did briefly dip below 20 FPS in Battlefield 3. Average frame rates remained relatively high on all the tests. However, if you’re a real stickler for gaming at 60 FPS and above, you’ll have to either keep your gaming confined to a single screen or dial back some detail options.

Matt Safford
Matt began piling up computer experience as a child with his Mattel Aquarius. He built his first PC in the late 1990s and ventured into mild PC modding in the early 2000s. He’s spent the last decade covering emerging technology for Smithsonian, Popular Science, and Consumer Reports, while testing components and PCs for Computer Shopper and Digital Trends. When not writing about tech, he’s often walking—through the streets of New York, over the sheep-dotted hills of Scotland, or just at his treadmill desk at home in front of the 50-inch 4K HDR TV that serves as his PC monitor.
  • DarkSable
    So... no mention of the fact that you're paying for a lot of things you don't need? In it's head-to-head against the DIY rig, I'm noticing a LOT of parts that I wouldn't even consider spending extra money on.

    And they're getting those parts at a discount, so you're paying a lot of money for that tech line.
    Reply
  • EzioAs
    "This system’s starting price is a relatively modest $1,225. For that, you get a Core i3-2120 CPU, an AMD Radeon HD 7750 graphics card, and a 500 GB hard drive."

    Wow, talk about rip off...
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    9539987 said:
    "This system’s starting price is a relatively modest $1,225. For that, you get a Core i3-2120 CPU, an AMD Radeon HD 7750 graphics card, and a 500 GB hard drive."

    Wow, talk about rip off...

    Haha, yeah. That's about what I spent for an i5-3570k and GTX 670. I'll stick with my hand-builts and NOT pay $700 for a tech support who reads from a script.
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    For this much price, i would add another $100 and get the i7-3770k. Those extra 4 cores will come in handy in apps.
    And probably get 2xHD7950. 2 card setups are easier to maintain than 3 card setups (drivers). And the compute capability of GCN is already legendry.
    Reply
  • amuffin
    2 680's would be a better choice.
    Reply
  • DjEaZy
    ... origin haz the good sense to put windows 7 in it...
    Reply
  • danielmunhato
    we just need now is a review with 3 7970´s vs 3 gtx 680 in full hd and beyond.
    Reply
  • Caspase
    mayankleoboy1For this much price, i would add another $100 and get the i7-3770k. Those extra 4 cores will come in handy in apps.And probably get 2xHD7950. 2 card setups are easier to maintain than 3 card setups (drivers). And the compute capability of GCN is already legendry.
    Those extra 4 threads. And I bet at stock it would lose.
    Why aren't temperatures shown? I was curious to see how an ivy @ 4.6 in a mid tower with 3 GPUs with modest cooling would fair...
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    Yeah, why no temperature measurement ? AFAIK, 4.6 on 3570K can get very hot.
    Reply
  • a 3000$ trash like a mac
    Reply