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Origin PC Millennium: 3-Way SLI And A 4.6 GHz Core i5

Origin PC Millenium Versus Doing It Yourself

Whenever a system builder’s product gets mentioned on a hardware enthusiast website, comments about building your own and saving hundreds of dollars tend to pile up pretty quickly. In most cases, that's absolutely true, and power users know they can pare back on costs by building their own machines (that's why we do a System Builder Marathon every single quarter). But many people don’t have the time or know-how to build their own machine, nor the patience to troubleshoot issues on their own. If you fret over service and tech support, there’s certainly a benefit in buying a custom-built system.

But in an effort to address the do-it-yourself crowd with a full disclosure, and to figure out just what a company charges for its services, we’ll be pricing out the parts to build a similar system with our desktop reviews. We'll stick as close as possible to the reviewed systems' components, using parts and pricing from Newegg when available. Here’s a breakdown of the parts and prices for the Origin Millennium as of 12/17/2012:

Origin PC Millennium DIY Clone
Intel Core i5-3570K$215
Asus Maximus V Extreme$369
8 GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3-1600 (2 x 4 GB)$42
EVGA GeForce GTX 660 Ti$870 ($290 x 3)
120 GB Intel SSD 520$270 ($135 x 2)
Seagate Barracuda 1 TB 7,200 RPM Drive$70
Corsair Hydro Series H80 Cooler$85
Corsair HX Series HX1050 Power Supply$210
BitFenix Shinobi case w/window$80
LG DVD Burner$17
Rosewill Internal Card Reader$15
Windows 7 Home Premium$100
Total Price$2,343

So, you pay about a premium of about $730 for Origin PC's system compared to building it yourself. That's far from insignificant, but we also consider it reasonable for access to a 24/7 tech support number, particularly if you're not confident working on your own rig.

The included one-year warranty covers parts replacement and 45-day free shipping in case there’s an issue with your system out of the box, as we had with our first system. You can extend the free shipping for a full year for an extra $70, or up the warranty to three years for an extra $269.

Sure, much of the Tom's Hardware audience won't need any of that. But if you're shelling out more than $3,000 for a custom-built system that you don't know how to work on yourself, it’s nice to have someone to call when issues arise.

Matt Safford
Matt began piling up computer experience as a child with his Mattel Aquarius. He built his first PC in the late 1990s and ventured into mild PC modding in the early 2000s. He’s spent the last decade covering emerging technology for Smithsonian, Popular Science, and Consumer Reports, while testing components and PCs for Computer Shopper and Digital Trends. When not writing about tech, he’s often walking—through the streets of New York, over the sheep-dotted hills of Scotland, or just at his treadmill desk at home in front of the 50-inch 4K HDR TV that serves as his PC monitor.
  • DarkSable
    So... no mention of the fact that you're paying for a lot of things you don't need? In it's head-to-head against the DIY rig, I'm noticing a LOT of parts that I wouldn't even consider spending extra money on.

    And they're getting those parts at a discount, so you're paying a lot of money for that tech line.
    Reply
  • EzioAs
    "This system’s starting price is a relatively modest $1,225. For that, you get a Core i3-2120 CPU, an AMD Radeon HD 7750 graphics card, and a 500 GB hard drive."

    Wow, talk about rip off...
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    9539987 said:
    "This system’s starting price is a relatively modest $1,225. For that, you get a Core i3-2120 CPU, an AMD Radeon HD 7750 graphics card, and a 500 GB hard drive."

    Wow, talk about rip off...

    Haha, yeah. That's about what I spent for an i5-3570k and GTX 670. I'll stick with my hand-builts and NOT pay $700 for a tech support who reads from a script.
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    For this much price, i would add another $100 and get the i7-3770k. Those extra 4 cores will come in handy in apps.
    And probably get 2xHD7950. 2 card setups are easier to maintain than 3 card setups (drivers). And the compute capability of GCN is already legendry.
    Reply
  • amuffin
    2 680's would be a better choice.
    Reply
  • DjEaZy
    ... origin haz the good sense to put windows 7 in it...
    Reply
  • danielmunhato
    we just need now is a review with 3 7970´s vs 3 gtx 680 in full hd and beyond.
    Reply
  • Caspase
    mayankleoboy1For this much price, i would add another $100 and get the i7-3770k. Those extra 4 cores will come in handy in apps.And probably get 2xHD7950. 2 card setups are easier to maintain than 3 card setups (drivers). And the compute capability of GCN is already legendry.
    Those extra 4 threads. And I bet at stock it would lose.
    Why aren't temperatures shown? I was curious to see how an ivy @ 4.6 in a mid tower with 3 GPUs with modest cooling would fair...
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    Yeah, why no temperature measurement ? AFAIK, 4.6 on 3570K can get very hot.
    Reply
  • a 3000$ trash like a mac
    Reply