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ViewSonic XG2703-GS QHD G-Sync Monitor Review

Conclusion

This is the first G-Sync monitor we’ve seen from ViewSonic, and it’s clear that the extra time spent in development was worth it. From its high-quality AHVA panel by AU Optronics to a correctly implemented G-Sync module and gaming features, it’s bound to appeal to gamers of all skill levels. It makes no pretense towards high value, costing about the same as comparable products. But if you’re brand loyal or simply haven’t jumped on the G-Sync train yet, the XG2703-GS is a great choice.

For its intended use, it excels in all areas. While 240Hz is great, 165Hz is closer to the framerate most PCs are likely capable of. With our Nvidia GTX Titan X, the most demanding games kept the action between 60 and 90 FPS while less intense titles easily topped 100. That’s why we keep recommending QHD as an ideal resolution for enthusiasts. Ultra HD is great and all, but it’s still limited to 60Hz. And you’ll need an expensive video card to get anywhere near 60 FPS.

Our review sample suffered from only two flaws worth noting. First, its black field uniformity was below average thanks to slight bleed in the corners. That’s largely due to the tight fit of its anti-glare layer. The upside to this is a higher level of clarity than you’ll find in many other displays at this resolution. We didn’t find it to be a distraction in real-world content.

The other issue is easily fixed with calibration. While the XG2703-GS is reasonably accurate out of the box, proper adjustments can take it to another level. The panel has higher-than-average contrast so it makes sense to wring the best possible image quality from it. ViewSonic sets the monitor up with a default gamma curve that’s too bright, damaging color detail and lowering perceived contrast. By tweaking the RGB sliders and selecting the better gamma preset of 2.4, measured accuracy and picture quality is greatly improved.

We haven’t said too much about ULMB in this particular review. Every G-Sync monitor has it but most can’t get bright enough to really take advantage of the backlight strobe. The XG2703-GS is no exception. Its max output of 333cd/m2 isn’t enough to make up for a 76% drop in brightness. And without independent brightness settings, you’ll be visiting the OSD every time you change modes. Solution? Set it on 165Hz with G-Sync and leave it there. ULMB offers no visual advantage even when it is bright enough.

Gamers can delight in a vast array of choices when it comes to adaptive refresh. G-Sync is still the premium technology. The price reflects that, and for Nvidia devotees, it’s the only choice. If only IPS, you should consider the ViewSonic XG2703-GS. It’s not perfect, but for an early effort, it easily keeps up with the competition.

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  • dstarr3
    "120Hz ULMB... 1440p IPS panel... looking good so far..."
    *checks price*
    "Sigh... Figures..."
    Reply
  • Sam Hain
    Ditch that 1970's avocado green accent color! Why for?
    Reply
  • Dantte
    Slow, glows like it was built in a nuclear test zone, and no contrast to speak of. But hey, your red is very red, your blue is very blue, your green is very green, and if you stare at your monitor from the side (cause thats how everyone is doing it); IPS is the monitor for you!
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    So who makes the actual panel? LG? Samsung? Regarding the price, I see it on Amazon and NewEgg right now for $650 (US). Considering I paid over $500 for my Dell U2713HM 27" 1440p 60Hz IPS monitor back in 2013, I'd say this is an excellent bargain.

    Regarding out of box calibration, you can buy a very good monitor calibration tool like Datacolor's SpyderCHECKR 24 for $50. Well worth the investment if you care about color accuracy on not only your PC and laptop monitors, but your HDTVs.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    Never mind, I found the answer on another website's review. The panel is made by AU Optronics (merger of Acer Display Technology and Unipac Optoelectronics). Going forward on monitor reviews can you guys please include information on who makes the panel?
    Reply
  • coolitic
    3H AG is awful for any high-quality monitor and the low brightness will make ULMB subpar.
    Reply
  • bentonsl_2010
    If you read the article you would of seen that they stated the panel is made by AU Optronics
    Reply
  • the nerd 389
    Just curious: why do you calibrate to a gamma of 2.2?

    The sRGB standard, IEC 61966-2-1:1999, varies between 1.0 and 2.4 across the output range. I understand that the decision to write the standard in that way stems from how the CRTs of the day responded, so it may not apply to LCD screens.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    19705624 said:
    *checks price*
    "Sigh... Figures..."
    Don't expect G-sync to get significantly cheaper any time soon as Nvidia has a monopoly over the proprietary scaler it requires. The joys of single-vendor proprietary standards.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    19706303 said:
    If you read the article you would of seen that they stated the panel is made by AU Optronics

    I did not read the first part of the conclusion page which is where it is referenced. So it was my bad. Still, I would expect that info to be mentioned in the introduction page, not the conclusion page.

    Reply