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Asus to Cut GPU Prices by Up to 25%, Starting in April

Asus GPU pricing slashed
(Image credit: Asus ROG)

Asus has confirmed that it is slashing graphics card prices by up to 25%. In an email statement earlier today, an Asus representative added that price reductions will be applied to its entry-level, mid-range and high-performance models (not just the RX 6500 XT thankfully). The company cited cuts to the tariffs on US imports from China as a major reason behind the MSRP reductions.

"As a result of the latest tariff lift on Chinese imports from the Office of the United States Trade Representative, Gamers and PC enthusiasts will see lower prices on ASUS GeForce RTX 30-series graphic cards starting on April 1st, 2022," an Asus rep told us.

Asus is one of the biggest graphics card vendors, responsible for two major GPU series (Asus and ROG), and sells both reference and custom designs from both AMD and Nvidia. It is also an Intel Arc Alchemist partner for desktops, laptops and Add-in-Cards (AiCs). However, the statement we received today only mentioned Nvidia GPUs. "Lower prices will affect entry level GeForce RTX 3050 and RTX 3060, mid-range RTX 3070 and high performance RTX 3080 and RTX 3090 graphics cards," wrote the Asus rep.

Please note that the MSRP cut of 25% isn't being applied across the board. This is an 'up to' figure, or as Asus puts it, "Consumers should expect prices to decline up to 25% on different models throughout the springtime."

Asus GPU pricing slashed

(Image credit: Asus ROG)

This move by Asus is particularly important, as in 2021 the Taiwanese PCs, components and devices giant lead the charge in the opposite direction. It raised prices first in January 2021, citing tariffs, and again in April due to purported component prices and demand.

We can't be sure when the Asus MSRP drops will work their way through to the stores. April 1 is mentioned as the start for the price cuts, but some will see reductions faster than others. Since we now know about this impending reduction, it wouldn't be wise to buy a GPU between now and the weekend. One thing is for sure: If Asus is selling its wares cheaper than rival brands, companies like MSI, Gigabyte and EVGA will have to act too.

Perhaps Asus' talk of the tariff changes isn't the only reason for its sudden pricing strategy shift. If it is watching the pricing trends, as we are, it might be seeing the last opportunity to sell into this MSRP++ market before it hits the floor. Earlier today we reported on the slide of graphics card prices in the EU –- an area of course unaffected by the US tariffs on China.  

We will be keeping a close eye on developments, like similar moves from competing companies, so stay tuned. Meanwhile, why not check out our Best Graphics Cards for Gaming in 2022 guide, to ease the wait for MSRP or better pricing to arrive.

Mark Tyson
Mark Tyson

Mark Tyson is a Freelance News Writer at Tom's Hardware US. He enjoys covering the full breadth of PC tech; from business and semiconductor design to products approaching the edge of reason.

  • ezst036
    The government should consider abolishing the corporate tax, then maybe we could get up to 50% off of all our GPUs.
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    ezst036 said:
    The government should consider abolishing the corporate tax, then maybe we could get up to 50% off of all our GPUs.
    Nah, they'll just keep prices the same and pocket the rest.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    ezst036 said:
    The government should consider abolishing the corporate tax, then maybe we could get up to 50% off of all our GPUs.
    If the government doesn't get any money from corporations, it will need to get the money for defence, medical research, space exploration, education, etc. from elsewhere, which would mean some combination of increased individual income, sales, property, etc. taxes. It basically shifts even more of the tax burden from the wealthy to the worker class that already has little to no money to spare.
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    A$U$ reducing prices? 25% might get them on par with some of the most expensive options offered by their competitors. A$U$ has been the most egregious in taking advantage of the covid and supply chain issues.

    The price drops are also making me wonder just how good next-generation cards are. Intel appears to be bringing a serious competitor with its Arc products. Nvidia's 4060 is supposed to land between the 3090 and 3080. AMD is boasting about its upcoming GPUs too. Reduced mining demand, higher energy costs, return of travel/dining/concerts, and no stimulus means we could actually see GPU prices come back down to sane levels later this year. Just have to keep waiting. Anyone who buys a 3080 Ti for $1500 right now is going to feel terrible about it in September.
    Reply
  • ezst036
    hotaru.hino said:
    Nah, they'll just keep prices the same and pocket the rest.

    Agreed. My expectation was that after the tariffs were eliminated, they would keep prices the same and pocket the rest.

    Yet here we are. Truth is stranger than fiction.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    ezst036 said:
    Agreed. My expectation was that after the tariffs were eliminated, they would keep prices the same and pocket the rest.
    They can only do that when they have more buyers than they have stock reaching store shelves. Prices are dropping 10-30% month-on-month because stock isn't selling as fast as it is coming in and nobody wants to get stuck with excess unsold inventory they overpaid for as that directly cuts into profit margins and may even turn into a net loss per sale.
    Reply
  • Endymio
    InvalidError said:
    If the government doesn't get any money from corporations, it will need to get the money for defence, medical research, space exploration, education, etc. from elsewhere
    The government gets nothing from corporations already. Every dollar in so-called "corporate taxes" results in a combination of one of three things: higher prices for consumers, lower salaries for workers, or lower dividends/profits for shareholders. Corporations don't pay taxes. Corporate taxes are a shell game to hide who's actually paying the bills.
    Reply
  • Endymio
    The company cited cuts to the tariffs on US imports from China as a major reason behind the MSRP reductions
    Fantastic. If I'm going to support slave labor and genocide in China, I might as well profit personally by doing so, right?
    Reply
  • jacob249358
    Endymio said:
    Fantastic. If I'm going to support slave labor and genocide in China, I might as well profit personally by doing so, right?
    Everyone in the US is using Chinese made products every day so in theory we are all supporting slaves and genocide :(
    Reply
  • renz496
    bigdragon said:
    A$U$ reducing prices? 25% might get them on par with some of the most expensive options offered by their competitors. A$U$ has been the most egregious in taking advantage of the covid and supply chain issues.

    The price drops are also making me wonder just how good next-generation cards are. Intel appears to be bringing a serious competitor with its Arc products. Nvidia's 4060 is supposed to land between the 3090 and 3080. AMD is boasting about its upcoming GPUs too. Reduced mining demand, higher energy costs, return of travel/dining/concerts, and no stimulus means we could actually see GPU prices come back down to sane levels later this year. Just have to keep waiting. Anyone who buys a 3080 Ti for $1500 right now is going to feel terrible about it in September.

    Asus consider themselves as the Apple among other OEM/AIB. still remember when they tried to sell their Strix 1060 for $320 when base 1060 starts at $250. For a mid range segment where even something like $20 can swing people to one product to the other charging $70 over MSRP is absurd. Then how they confidently price their 1050Ti at $180 when a week before 1050Ti launch AMD officially drop RX470 down to $170.

    As for next gen part some people probably will not going to feel that much bitter even if they know buying now will makes them feel a bit of buyer remorse. Yes no more mining but the supply on 5nm mostly even more tight than what we see with 7nm. Even before the pandemic and mining the competition to get capacity for 7nm is extremely fierce. Initially you need to book your capacity 6 months in advance and then later TSMC said you need to book your capacity 1 year in advance because the companies are lining up for it.
    Reply