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Zen 4 Madness: AMD EPYC Genoa With 96 Cores, 12-Channel DDR5 Memory, and AVX-512

AMD EPYC Genoa Mockup
(Image credit: ExecutableFix)

In a recent Gigabyte hacking event that happened a bit over a week ago, attackers stole 112GB of data from the Gigabyte server. This included confidential files of the upcoming products and information shared under NDAs and contracts. Today, according to a new report, information regarding AMD's EPYC processors (codenamed Genoa) has emerged after the hackers posted the files online. According to the leaked information, the chips come with 96 cores, support 12 channels of DDR5 memory, and also mark the debut of AVX-512 support to AMD's lineup. 

Gigabyte is having a rough few days: from a PSU RMA debacle to the recent hacking incident, the situation has worsened. Attackers that stole 112GB of data from Gigabyte's server have published some information regarding AMD's upcoming EPYC Genoa CPU microarchitecture and some of its details.

Previously, we believed that Genoa was a 96-core design, and that turned out to be true. The leaked documents show that the Genoa is still made up of 8-core CCDs, but now there are 12 of them totaling 96 cores with 192 threads of Zen 4 IP. The platform to host this massive processor is AMD's SP5, pictured in the renders below.

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AMD EPYC Genoa

(Image credit: @KittyYYuko (Twitter))
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AMD EPYC Genoa

(Image credit: @KittyYYuko (Twitter))
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AMD EPYC Genoa

(Image credit: @KittyYYuko (Twitter))

A particularly interesting fact is that AMD has decided to pair 12-channel DDR5 memory with Genoa, giving all 96 cores lots of bandwidth to operate normally. Given that such a high number of cores requires massive speeds, a 12-channel controller should be sufficient. In addition, it appears that Intel's AVX-512 makes its debut in AMD processors. The leaked documents show the appearance of EVEX instructions in Genoa, which are actually an AVX-512 type of instruction, indicating an AVX-512 engine in these new processors.

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AMD EPYC Genoa

(Image credit: @KittyYYuko (Twitter))
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AMD EPYC Genoa

(Image credit: @KittyYYuko (Twitter))
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AMD EPYC Genoa

(Image credit: @KittyYYuko (Twitter))

Another interesting tidbit from the leak is the supposed power draw and power configuration. The highest-end SKU should have a 320 Watt TDP with a maximum power draw of 400 Watts. For 1 millisecond (ms), the CPU can draw 700 Watts, so server power supplies will need additional breathing room.

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Information about the TDP ranges has also been shared, pulling back a big part of the veil of secrecy wrapped around the Zen 4 powered Genoa chips. The hacked information is quite expansive and several entities are currently combing through it for more information. Stay tuned.