Skip to main content

EVGA GeForce RTX 2080, 2070 Super KO Gaming Cards Arrive With Budget Prices

EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Super KO Edition (Image credit: EVGA)

Building on the EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 KO Ultra Gaming's success, EVGA is adding two more KO Edition graphics cards to its Turing-powered arsenal. The company today announced KO Gaming versions of the RTX 2080 Super and RTX 2070 Super.

The new graphics cards use EVGA's aftermarket dual-slot cooling solution that's backed up by a pair of 85mm cooling fans. Both models measure 10.62 inches (269.83mm) long so they should fit inside the majority of modern PC cases. They also feature the same PCIe power connector configuration, which consists of a single 8-pin and 6-pin.

Since the GeForce RTX 2080 Super and GeForce RTX 2070 Super KO Gaming are budget-focused offerings, EVGA ships them with reference specifications. The GeForce RTX 2080 Super and GeForce RTX 2070 Super KO Gaming utilize the same TU104 silicon but with differing core counts. The first comes with 3,072 CUDA cores, 384 Tensor cores and 48 RT cores, while the latter packs 2,560 CUDA cores, 320 Tensor cores and 40 RT cores. For reference, the vanilla GeForce RTX 2080 Super and RTX 2070 Super have a boost clock of 1,815 MHz and 1,770 MHz, respectively.

Each EVGA graphics card sports 8GB of GDDR6 memory across a 256-bit memory interface (just like Nvidia's Founder's Edition cards). Therefore, the GeForce RTX 2080 Super's memory is clocked at 15.5 Gbps for a memory bandwidth of 495.9 GBps, and the GeForce RTX 2070 Super's memory runs at 14 Gbps for a bandwidth up to 448 GBps.

Image 1 of 2

EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Super KO Gaming

EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Super KO Gaming (Image credit: EVGA)
Image 2 of 2

EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 Super KO Gaming

EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 Super KO Gaming (Image credit: EVGA)

Display outputs are the same on both graphics cards. They each provide you with three DisplayPort 1.4 outputs and one HDMI 2.0b port (for a look at the difference between the two, check out our DisplayPort vs. HDMI analysis). EVGA rates the GeForce RTX 2080 Super KO Gaming with a total power draw of 250W and the GeForce RTX 2070 Super KO Gaming at 215W. In either case, a decent 650W power supply from a reputable manufacturer should do the trick.

EVGA backs the graphics card with a limited three-year warranty. The GeForce RTX 2080 Super KO Gaming costs $699.99, while the GeForce RTX 2070 Super KO Gaming has an MSRP of $499.99. Those are the same prices as Nvidia's Founders Edition models, but they're slightly less expensive than EVGA's other Super models.

  • logainofhades
    Prices are not exactly spectacular. You can already get 2070s for that price, or less. Same for the 2080s.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    Considering a 2080 SUPER is typically not a whole lot faster than the 1080 Ti that launched for the same price over three years ago, any 2080 SUPER is arguably not priced particularly well, even at MSRP. So I would not exactly consider these to be "budget priced" cards.

    Between the upcoming next-generation consoles offering a similar level of performance at what will probably be a lower price, and Intel likely increasing competition in the graphics card market, we might see this level of performance available at half the price a year from now.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Prices aren't even that great against existing cards. I got an EVGA 2070 Super XC Ultra Gaming at Best Buy, of all places, for $519.99, only $20 more than the KO, and it's quiet as a church mouse under anything but the heaviest of gaming, it's a low frequency whoosh of air, literally the quietest post DirectX 10 GPU I've ever owned, and it runs at 2085/1900 GPU/VRAM.

    Still, if Ampere lives up to expectations, these prices will likely plummet if and only if AMD's RDNA2 lives up to expectations, but I can't see myself moving from this card for a long, long time.
    Reply
  • derekmoore333
    BWAHAHAHAHAahahahahahah at $499.99 and $699.99 being

    "BUDGET" pricing - OMG lolol what a joke!!!
    Reply
  • Nemz
    I bought a 2080 for £430 off Ebay months ago (seen them go for £390) so these cards aren't exactly budget prices. Note, the 2080 was only a little bit faster than my 1080ti (which actually sold for £455) but it's definitely quieter and Metro Exodus does look stunning (looks great without RTX to be fair as well). No way would I put up the money for release retail price or these cards especially when there's a good chance of new cards coming from Team Red & Green later this year.
    Reply
  • Zizo007
    I am staying with my Asus OC RTX 2080Ti for a long time. It now costs 2200$CA with tax here and I got it used for 1500$CA 6 months ago.

    I am skipping nextgen because the 3080Ti will probably cost 3000+$CA here with taxes and this corona lack of stock.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    Yep, we've seen this numerous times in the past where AMD provides zero competition in either performance and/or price, so nVidia prices as they will. AMD's worse though, their 5700XT replaced the RX 580 in the product stack, yet it costs twice as much.
    Reply
  • YoAndy
    Is that what E.V.G.A call budget nowadays?
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    cryoburner said:
    No way would I put up the money for release retail price or these cards especially when there's a good chance of new cards coming from Team Red & Green later this year.
    Don't forget about Team Blue. Intel should have dedicated graphics cards coming out as well, though it's still a bit unclear what performance ranges they will be competing in initially. I'm not sure if I would actually pick up a first-gen Intel card, especially since they have a history of questionable long-term support for their integrated chipsets, but they could still increase competition in this space.

    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    Yep, we've seen this numerous times in the past where AMD provides zero competition in either performance and/or price, so nVidia prices as they will. AMD's worse though, their 5700XT replaced the RX 580 in the product stack, yet it costs twice as much.
    The 5700 XT could arguably be considered more of a Vega 64 successor, even if the graphics chip is smaller and power draw is more like that of the RX 580. In general, I agree that the RX 5000 series hasn't exactly been as competitive as it could have been though. Nvidia only offered minimal price to performance gains with their 20-series cards, and AMD just sort of followed along. Perhaps that's due to limited 7nm production though, which AMD would rather put toward their CPUs, which are probably more profitable on a per-wafer basis, along with their next-gen console APUs, which they are obligated to fulfill.

    I wouldn't exactly say there's been "zero" competition though. The 5700 XT outperformed the RTX 2070 that launched less than a year prior for $100+ more, and it doesn't perform too far behind the 2070 SUPER either, albeit without any sort of dedicated raytracing hardware. Neither Nvidia or AMD really provided the kind of performance gains one might expect after such a long hardware generation though.
    Reply
  • IceQueen0607
    cryoburner said:
    Considering a 2080 SUPER is typically not a whole lot faster than the 1080 Ti that launched for the same price over three years ago, any 2080 SUPER is arguably not priced particularly well, even at MSRP. So I would not exactly consider these to be "budget priced" cards.

    Indeed! The 2080 Super in AUD is20%-30% more than the GTX 1080 Ti. So in terms of performance per dollar its actually a backwards step. No budget pricing here!

    And it has 3GB less GDDR RAM than the GTX 1080 Ti.
    Reply