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Gigabyte Confirms X670 AMD Ryzen 7000 Zen 4 AM5 Motherboards for Computex

Gigabyte Computex 2022
(Image credit: Gigabyte)

Computex 2022 is fast approaching, and it was pretty much assumed that AMD would give us some early details on its next-generation Ryzen CPU platform. However, Gigabyte today confirmed the news in a press release, stating that it will come to Computex bearing gifts in the form of AMD X670 motherboards for Ryzen 7000 processors.

The company will showcase four new SKUs, which will be vying for a spot on our best motherboards for gaming list: the X670 Aorus Xtreme, X670 Master, X670 Pro AX, and the X670 Aero D. Gigabyte also confirmed that all of the motherboards will come equipped with a PCIe 5.0 slot for next-generation graphics cards and a new M.2 interface for the incoming crop of PCIe 5.0 SSDs (which will support bandwidth of up to 14 GBps).

AMD Ryzen 7000

(Image credit: AMD)

We should also mention that the arrival of AMD 600-Series chipsets will usher in the first new CPU socket design for Ryzen desktop processors since AM4 launched in early 2017 (and eventually spanned five processor generations). The new LGA1718 AM5 socket will first serve as a home for Zen 4-based Ryzen 7000 "Raphael" processors built using a new 5nm process node.

In addition to the aforementioned native PCIe 5.0 support, Ryzen 7000 processors will support DDR5 memory, which first debuted with Intel's 12th generation Alder Lake processors in 2021. In what could serve as a wrinkle for customers looking to cut costs when upgrading to new Ryzen 7000 processors, our supply chain sources indicate that new X670 and B650 motherboards will exclusively support DDR5 memory. Naturally, this requirement will hit enthusiasts in their wallets, given the price premium of DDR5 over legacy DDR4 memory.

AMD Ryzen 7000

(Image credit: AMD)

This is a departure from what Intel did with Alder Lake and its accompanying 600-Series chipsets. Alder Lake processors can support DDR4 or DDR5 memory, and many motherboard manufacturers have opted to produce DDR4-capable designs to satiate enthusiasts that have already invested in DDR4 modules. 

Although there is sure to be plenty of excitement around AMD's incoming Ryzen 7000 processors and supporting motherboards, it's also likely that Computex 2022 will also see the announcement (or at least a teaser) of RDNA 3-based Radeon RX 7000 Series graphics cards. 

"High-performance computing plays such an essential role in our daily lives, and AMD is committed to always push the envelope on performance and innovation," said Dr. Lisa Su earlier this month. "At this year's Computex, AMD will share how we accelerate innovation with our broad ecosystem of partners."

Brandon Hill is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware. He has written about PC and Mac tech since the late 1990s with bylines at AnandTech, DailyTech, and Hot Hardware. When he is not consuming copious amounts of tech news, he can be found enjoying the NC mountains or the beach with his wife and two sons.

  • -Fran-
    I can confidently say we all can live with PCIe 4 connectivity for a good while, as long as there's a lot of it. PCIe 5 is not going to give tangible benefits anytime soon to the average user. I'd be even willing to say PCIe 3 over 4 doesn't even show that many improvements in GPU performance and even NVMe drive performance (using peak sustained reads is stupid as a single metric "show-off").

    People loves to jump blindly to the latest trends without stopping to think if it makes sense to jump still. AMD giving the option to the AIBs how they control the segmentation a bit better is actually a good idea. That way we can all choose what we want based on the specs of each chipset/motherboard family. I guess the fine print here is the amount of total lanes each chipset will accommodate and the uplink to the CPU/SoC.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • gg83
    L1 tech on YouTube showed the gpu over pcie3 was slower than pcie4 im pretty sure. Theres probably more to it than i understand
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    gg83 said:
    L1 tech on YouTube showed the gpu over pcie3 was slower than pcie4 im pretty sure. Theres probably more to it than i understand
    You're not wrong. I guess I should clarify that a bit: PCIe3 vs PCIe4, when you're not hitting VRAM limits and the card doesn't need to move Gigabytes of data at a time, then the performance loss is minimal (5%?). PCIe 4 to 5 though, it is effectively and technically 0%, as there's no PCIe 5 cards yet to compare, lol. That being said, the "loss" will probably be at or under 5% again. Is that significant? Not to me at least.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • Hutchinman
    The subheading of the article has a typo.

    "Gigabyte is brining four X670 motherboards to Computex"

    Should be

    "Gigabyte is bringing four X670 motherboards to Computex"
    Reply
  • patrick47018
    Are they "Brining them" to test for corrosion perhaps? :sneaky:



    Seriously though I am of course very interested in X670 and the next generation of Ryzen.
    Reply