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Samsung Introduces Curved 27-inch CF591 FreeSync-Over-HDMI Monitor

Samsung is one of the pioneers of curved displays, first with its TVs and then with its monitors. Although the debate as to whether there is any benefit to a curved display still rages, especially when it comes to TVs, there's no question that for computer monitors, a curve makes them more immersive. At CES, Samsung is introducing the new CF591 27-inch curved monitor.

Samsung already has a 27-inch curved monitor available in the form of the SE591CS that was launched earlier this year. This model is an affordable ($350) 1080p curved display with a VA panel with VGA, DisplayPort and HDMI connectivity. Its radius is 4000R, which Samsung says is the “optimal radius to ensure comfortable viewing” on a 27-inch display.

Well, with the new CF591, we guess Samsung has changed its mind about what is optimal, because this display’s curvature is a much tighter 1800R. Samsung claimed that this level of curvature is much more immersive, and “images have a presence not felt on a traditional 4000R curved screen, making users truly feel like they’re a part of the action.”

Unfortunately, Samsung has been a bit skimpy when it comes to any additional information about this display. Currently, we don’t know its resolution (officially), panel type (likely to be VA), connectivity options or anything else that is important. Samsung did highlight its dual 5 W speakers and frameless design for multi-monitor setups but is keeping everything else to itself for now.

However, this monitor's model number did ring a bell when we first read it. Earlier in December we wrote about AMD’s new Freesync over HDMI technology, and what do you know, the CF591 is listed as one of the upcoming displays with this tech. Also, the handy chart AMD provided us also shows that this monitor will be a 1080p display.

Along with the lack of specification information, we do not currently have availability and pricing details for the CF591, but as a 27-inch 1080p display, we don’t expect it to be very expensive.

Alex Davies is an Associate Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware and Tom's IT Pro, covering Smartphones, Tablets, and Virtual Reality. You can follow him on Twitter. Follow Tom's Hardware on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

  • Garrek99
    Can't believe the manufacturers are still focusing on 1080p especially on monitors that are larger than 22".
    So many consumers don't understand resolution as a concept that there is still a market for large 1080p monitors.
    Reply
  • Quixit
    "there's no question that for computer monitors, a curve makes them more immersive"

    I disagree entirely, the reverse pincusion effect is anything but immersive. So yes, there is very much question to the validity of this claim.
    Reply
  • eltoro
    What about Gsync Samsung? Being free doesn't make it appealing to most of the market, which are NVIDIA video card owners (not counting onboard/on die).
    Reply
  • kewlbootz
    Can't believe the manufacturers are still focusing on 1080p especially on monitors that are larger than 22".
    So many consumers don't understand resolution as a concept that there is still a market for large 1080p monitors.


    Or, 1080p is sufficient for plenty of people, whether it's because they sit far enough away from the monitor that the PPI isn't particularly relevant, or they simply don't care.

    I think most people understand what resolution is. It's just that not everyone is an enthusiast.
    Reply
  • ammaross
    "Currently, we don’t know its resolution (officially), panel type (likely to be VA), connectivity options or anything else that is important."
    Looks like connectivity is 2xHDMI and a DVI (or VGA?) port with a headphone jack based on the picture provided....
    Reply
  • ahaywood
    "there's no question that for computer monitors, a curve makes them more immersive"

    I disagree entirely, the reverse pincusion effect is anything but immersive. So yes, there is very much question to the validity of this claim.
    "there's no question that for computer monitors, a curve makes them more immersive"

    I disagree entirely, the reverse pincusion effect is anything but immersive. So yes, there is very much question to the validity of this claim.

    For normal aspect ratio displays I haven't noticed much benefit with curved. However, with 21:9, I have owned both flat and curved, and the initial feeling I had with the flat one was that the left and right edges seemed oddly far away. This distraction is fixed with a curved 21:9, and I would never go back to flat at this aspect ratio.
    Reply
  • f-14
    "Currently, we don’t know its resolution (officially), panel type (likely to be VA), connectivity options or anything else that is important."
    Looks like connectivity is 2xHDMI and a DVI (or VGA?) port with a headphone jack based on the picture provided....
    it's vga, dvi is easily recognizable as wider and the flat large pin slot on one side is the dead giveaway
    that was the first thing i looked at to see if it would be one of those 60hz refresh that causes headaches from florescent lighting flicker being so incredibly slow, but the whole reason they use less energy.

    wish employers were so damn cheap they made panels that only worked by looking at them with the sun behind them, then everybody could atleast get a windowed office and day light only work hours.
    maybe i will tell obama about this idea and he can make it executive order law, like daylight savings time electric bill for employers discount while the rest of us have to fork over full rate to live in the dark on our dime.
    Reply