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Asus TUF Gaming VG289Q 4K Monitor Review: Ultra HD, Ultra Cheap

Asus’ VG289Q delivers 4K HDR and Adaptive-Sync for a super-low price.

Asus VG289Q Ultra HD HDR
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Asus)

Viewing Angles

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Many users choose IPS for its excellent viewing angles, and the Asus TUF Gaming VG289Q is a great example. It only lost about 20% of its brightness at a 45 degrees off-axis with a slight shift to green. Details stayed sharp with every brightness step still visible. 

The top-down view was also better than what a TN or VA panel can boast. It showed visible detail with a 40% reduction in brightness.

Screen Uniformity 

To learn how we measure screen uniformity, click here.  

After the ANSI contrast test, we were concerned that the VG289Q might show some corner glow in the uniformity test, but that was not the case. Our sample measured well at just over 10% deviation from the center zone. We couldn’t see any bleed in a 0% black field pattern. 

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Pixel Response and Input Lag 

Click here to read up on our pixel response and input lag testing procedures. 

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Asus VG289Q Ultra HD HDR

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Asus VG289Q Ultra HD HDR

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Buying a 4K gaming monitor for under $400 requires one sacrifice –- speed. The VG289Q tops out at 60 Hz, and in our response and lag tests, it delivered performance commensurate with that limitation. On the plus side, a draw time of 22ms is faster than most 60 Hz screens; a more typical score would be 25ms. Overall lag is also good for the genre at 62ms. 

Clearly, a higher refresh rate is required for the smoothest possible gameplay. But if you are playing titles more focused on detail and realism than speed and response, the VG289Q’s Ultra HD resolution will be advantageous.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How We Test Monitors

MORE: All Monitor Content

  • Kridian
    The Amazon reviews of this ASUS TUF VG289Q are brutal! Buyer beware.
    Reply
  • rsymartin27
    One thing I hope dies soon is dp 1.2, I mean why even if they just use 1.4 we can get Gsync nd hdr both on same port. They should clearly mention that HDR will work only on hdmi in these monitors. Nd HDMI does not support G. Sync.
    Reply
  • Phaaze88
    Kridian said:
    The Amazon reviews of this ASUS TUF VG289Q are brutal! Buyer beware.
    Yeah, longevity is something most reviews don't cover. That's something for us as the customers to discover...

    Speaking of longevity, those Enermax Liqtech coolers come to mind...
    Reply
  • Neuspeed
    Just buy a Pixio PX7 Prime for $399 and call it a day.. 2k IPS / 165 Hz / HDR / AMD free-sync / G-sync supported.
    Reply
  • Zorkiz
    This is a zero buyer's regret purchase for me! I'm not a gamer, I just needed the best 4K IPS monitor for extended use at a sensible price. I took a gamble and bought the VG289Q for CAD/Office use based on its specs before there were any in depth reviews such as this one. Based on my subjective observations, I think this is an accurate review of what I have found to be an excellent and reliable 4K monitor for work/general purpose use, which is particularly surprising given the price. It looks like Asus have chosen a good IPS panel here. It's all in the review, but some points to emphasise:

    flicker-free backlight
    good colour accuracy
    even backlight brightness distribution
    zero dead pixels
    IPS panel gives very good viewing angles
    blacks are good
    three year warranty
    superb stand - very solid and adujsts for height/tilt/rotation
    not noticed any IPS "glow"
    28" size
    modest price

    After about 500hours of operation there are no issues at all . BTW -if you look closely the Amazon reviews are actually for a mish-mash of similar Asus monitors.
    Reply
  • zainpk60
    Zorkiz said:
    This is a zero buyer's regret purchase for me! I'm not a gamer, I just needed the best 4K IPS monitor for extended use at a sensible price. I took a gamble and bought the VG289Q for CAD/Office use based on its specs before there were any in depth reviews such as this one. Based on my subjective observations, I think this is an accurate review of what I have found to be an excellent and reliable 4K monitor for work/general purpose use, which is particularly surprising given the price. It looks like Asus have chosen a good IPS panel here. It's all in the review, but some points to emphasise:

    flicker-free backlight
    good colour accuracy
    even backlight brightness distribution
    zero dead pixels
    IPS panel gives very good viewing angles
    blacks are good
    three year warranty
    superb stand - very solid and adujsts for height/tilt/rotation
    not noticed any IPS "glow"
    28" size
    modest price

    After about 500hours of operation there are no issues at all . BTW -if you look closely the Amazon reviews are actually for a mish-mash of similar Asus monitors.

    I am also about to buy this and yeah most of the reviews on Amazon are for different styles. But I will still ask you this just as a suggestion. Should I proceed to buy it like I am coming from a 24 inch 1080p so is the 4k amazing on this monitor and how about the HDR.
    Reply
  • Zorkiz
    Hi Zainpk60,

    I went from a Dell IPS 24" to this one and yes, I think you should find the 4K amazing! I really can't say how good the HDR effect is as it's something I don't bother with as this is mainly my work monitor. IMHO the Tom's HARDWARE review seems pretty much spot-on so I think you could safely go with their take on HDR. I seem to recall that the maximum brightness, while plently bright enough for most purposes, is not quite enough to do HDR really well.
    Reply
  • zainpk60
    Zorkiz said:
    Hi Zainpk60,

    I went from a Dell IPS 24" to this one and yes, I think you should find the 4K amazing! I really can't say how good the HDR effect is as it's something I don't bother with as this is mainly my work monitor. IMHO the Tom's HARDWARE review seems pretty much spot-on so I think you could safely go with their take on HDR. I seem to recall that the maximum brightness, while plently bright enough for most purposes, is not quite enough to do HDR really well.

    So do you think its worth the investment of £350.
    Reply