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AMD Athlon 5350 And AM1 Platform Review: Kabini In A Socket

The AM1 Platform: Kabini Surfaces On The Desktop

AMD started banging the Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) drum shortly after purchasing ATI. But it wasn't until the company introduced its Jaguar architecture that we saw uptake really garner the big headlines. In rapid succession, AMD found its hybrid technology in the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and E- and A-series Mobility APUs (code-named Kabini and Temash) for mobile devices running Windows.

If you're not familiar with the Jaguar design, it's an evolution of AMD's Bobcat architecture, which we first looked at back in 2010. The goal this time around was to improve Bobcat's modest performance by augmenting the amount of work it could do per clock cycle. AMD also gave Jaguar support for more modern instruction set extensions like SSE 4.1/4.2 and AVX. Of course, in the process, APUs equipped with Jaguar get an updated on-board graphics engine. Gone is the VLIW-based design prevalent in Radeon HD 6000-and-newer GPUs, replaced by Graphics Core Next.

The Kabini-based APUs leverage up to four Jaguar cores and as many as 128 GCN-based shaders. If you want more technical depth on that processor, have a look at AMD's Kabini: Jaguar And GCN Come Together In A 15 W APU.

Almost a year has passed since our first look at Kabini. Originally, AMD positioned the APU as mobile-focused, ideal for low-power devices wielding the flexibility of x86. More recently, the company revealed its intention to sell the chip into a desktop platform called AM1 as well, built around its FS1b processor interface.

Of course, AMD's marketing machine is aflutter, calling AM1 the world's first "system in a socket," since Intel's Bay Trail-D design isn't upgradeable. It's an embedded configuration with a soldered-down SoC. Indeed, most of the Bay Trail-equipped boards we've seen so far appear best suited to industrial applications. In contrast, AM1 motherboards seem more desktop-like, supporting up to 16 GB of DDR3 memory and accommodating active cooling.

Athlon 5350Athlon 5150Sempron 3850Sempron 2650
CPU Cores4442
Clock Rate2.05 GHz1.6 GHz1.3 GHz1.45 GHz
GPU Frequency600 MHz600 MHz450 MHz400 MHz
Memory Data Rate1600 MT/s1600 MT/s1600 MT/s1333 MT/s
Total Cache2 MB2 MB2 MB1 MB
TDP25 W25 W25 W25 W
MSRP$59$49$39$34

AMD is shipping AM1-capable APUs under the company's Athlon and Sempron brands. Currently, all of the available models are rated for 25 W and feature 128 shaders, although the graphics engine ranges from 400 to 600 MHz, depending on the specific implementation. Three of the four chips come with four cores and 1600 MT/s memory support, while the lowest-priced Sempron 2650 is a dual-core version with a 1333 MT/s transfer rate cap. Core frequencies range from 1.3 to 2.05 GHz, which does serve to hold back performance. Then again, Intel is shipping similar to slightly higher clock rates on its Silvermont-based CPUs (Intel Silvermont Architecture: Does This Atom Change It All?).

Pentium J2900Celeron J1900Celeron J1800
CPU Cores442
Base/Turbo Boost Clock Rate2.41/2.67 GHz2/2.42 GHz2.41/2.58 GHz
Dynamic GPU Clock Range688/896 MHz688/854 MHz688/792 MHz
Memory Data Rate1333 MT/s1333 MT/s1333 MT/s
Total Cache2 MB2 MB1 MB
TDP10 W10 W10 W

At least in this segment, AMD and Intel are topping out with four cores (the Jaguar architecture can continue scaling, as it does in the Xbox and PlayStation, while Silvermont does as well in the Atom C2000 family). Intel's solution uses less power. However, the company's HD Graphics engine is also less capable. And memory support is limited to 1333 MT/s across the Bay Trail-D platform.

We'd expect AMD's socketed Kabini platform to be faster than the competition from Intel, based on all of those specifications, though Bay Trail-D may be more efficient. Let's take a closer look at the hardware for more detail.

  • srap
    Are the CPU/APU names on Page 4's third image correct?
    Reply
  • kartu
    Why is there no pricing on Intel CPUs on page 1?
    Reply
  • AMD Radeon
    i hope mini office pc box can be a new trend
    AM1 can be a potential winner in this market
    Reply
  • Niko_boy
    Ultra low detail lol made me confused for once
    Reply
  • Maxx_Power
    To Toms:

    What was the ambient temperature during the testing ? Surely Toms is not testing in an refrigerator ? That idle GPU and CPU temperature at 13 degrees Celsius seems about 10 degrees too low, given that they have to be necessarily above ambient conditions to make physical sense. Perhaps the sensors are not read correctly (wrong offset) ?

    For the Dota2 graphs, there seems to be a mistake for the color legend. The difference in color isn't resolution, since the resolution is fixed (right hand top corner of graph at 1080), so my guess is that red/black represents min/avg FPS similar to the 2nd graph on Grid2.

    Reply
  • bustapr
    lol my bad, misread and graphs are fine.
    Reply
  • nezzymighty
    Thanks for the article. I agree with your conclusion, as I would probably seek an alternative build for a a "PC-Like Device" as you put it. Seeing AM1 product costs relatively the same to an A4-4000 FM2+ confuses me, as I had originally expected (hoped) AM1 high-end combinations with a motherboard to cost around the $70 mark... If I were to make an AMD HTPC, or a typical AMD business computer, based on prices released by the e-tailers today, it would make more sense for me to build an FM2+ with A4-4000. Maybe prices will reduce in time to make this a more attractive alternative relative to an FM2+ for an HTPC or business computer.
    Reply
  • ykki
    "Based on our results, I'd guess that AMD's AM1 platform should be able to handle less-demanding MMOs like World of Warcraft, lightweight shooters like Left 4 Dead, and a wide range of even more casual games (such as Angry Birds)."
    I think that it is safe to say that it can max out angry birds at 4k :)
    Reply
  • ykki
    I think it would be nice to see NAS PCs rocking the AM1 platform
    Reply
  • cleeve
    13061890 said:
    To Toms:

    What was the ambient temperature during the testing ? Surely Toms is not testing in an refrigerator ? That idle GPU and CPU temperature at 13 degrees Celsius seems about 10 degrees too low, given that they have to be necessarily above ambient conditions to make physical sense. Perhaps the sensors are not read correctly (wrong offset) ?

    On-die sensors are notoriously inaccurate at low temperatures. In this case that's obvious, but we can only report what the sensors tell us.

    13061890 said:
    For the Dota2 graphs, there seems to be a mistake for the color legend. The difference in color isn't resolution, since the resolution is fixed (right hand top corner of graph at 1080), so my guess is that red/black represents min/avg FPS similar to the 2nd graph on Grid2.

    Good catch! Fixed. :)

    Reply