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Gigabyte G32QC Gaming Monitor Review: 32 Inches of Class-Leading Contrast

Solid big-screen performance at a more accessible price

Gigabyte G32QC
(Image: © Gigabyte)

In the G32QC’s Standard picture mode, the native color gamut is DCI-P3 and closely follows the D65 color temp at default settings for both SDR and HDR. If you want a reduced gamut for SDR content, there's an sRGB mode available too. 

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking

We describe our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here. 

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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The average gamer won't see the need to calibrate the G32QC. Its only flaws are a slightly visible green error at 100% brightness and its gamma running slightly darker than we’d like. This is excusable in a VA panel with high contrast like this one, but it could have a negative impact on color saturation. Overall though, this is excellent out-of-box performance.

Gamma adjustments required a little trial and error. After dialing in grayscale, we tried to lighten the luminance curve by selecting Gamma 2. This produced a good measurement run but desaturated color too much. In the end, we left it on Gamma 3, which provided a good balance between accurate luminance tracking and vibrant color.

The sRGB picture mode is a little less accurate. It runs cool from 50% brightness and higher, though gamma stays closer to 2.2 with slightly light shadows and slightly dark highlights. The good part is that brightness remains adjustable, so you don’t have to settle for a dark image.

Comparisons

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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

A Delta E (dE) of 1.60 is a respectable default number, but the G32QC is up against stiff competition. The visual difference between the top three monitors here is negligible. 

Calibration with our recommended settings had a greater impact on the other screens that the G32QC, moving it to last place. But we're still satisfied with the G32QC's grayscale performance.

In addition to improving the grayscale error level slightly, our calibration lowered gamma nicely. We experimented with the gamma presets but found the default setting, level 3, to show the least compromise in color saturation. 0.20 is a reasonably tight value range, and the final average of 2.31 is only 5% off from the 2.2 spec. For VA monitors, we prefer gamma err on the dark side rather than the light.

Color Gamut Accuracy

For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here. 

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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The G32QC does a good job rendering the DCI-P3 gamut. It hits all the targets for red and blue and only comes up short in green. This is the most commonly under-saturated primary in nearly all the extended color screens we’ve tested.

Calibration barely affected color tracking and only managed a small reduction in the already excellent Delta E value. This is excellent.

The sRGB mode has a few issues in red, magenta and yellow. Red is under-saturated in general, missing its targets by around 10%, while magenta and yellow are off in hue. Grayscale and gamma are OK in this mode, but the picture looks a bit flat to our eyes. We preferred to play games in Standard mode for both SDR and HDR content.

Comparisons

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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G32QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

All the monitors here deliver highly accurate color so the G32QC’s last place finish is understandable considering its price. In the gamut volume test, it runs mid-pack when compared to similar monitors in the DCI realm. For sRGB, it comes up a bit short in red. If you want to use it for color-critical work, the Standard mode paired with a software profile is your best bet. 

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How We Test Monitors

MORE: All Monitor Content

  • warezme
    Looks nice for the price. This one is definitely worthy of consideration based on stats. I wish it was 4K but no big deal if it isn't.
    Reply
  • Carlos Enrique
    8 bit, VA, no USB hub...Next, please.
    Reply
  • milleron
    For my money, Carlos, you're exactly right. But I suppose this monitor is pretty good for the US$400-500 range.
    Reply
  • snowlock
    Don't do it.
    I had this thing 35 days before the backlight started failing. Gigabyte refuses to do return shipping on their defective items after 30 days. Return shipping was $300 via fedex. Skip the middleman and just burn your money instead.
    https://ibb.co/6XM72Yb
    Reply
  • BlackHoleBox
    The explosion of VA "gaming" monitors over the past few years is one of the worst things that could happen to people who value image and motion quality.

    Samsung and AUO flooded the market with low grade 32" VA panels leading to countless no-name companies dropping them into cheap cabinets with other substandard components and overpricing them in the name of "gaming" monitors. And since idiots bought them up in droves, the availability of IPS displays shrank and their prices skyrocketed.

    So screw you Samsung. Screw you too, AUO.
    Reply
  • TK31
    Had this monitor for about 3 months now... It's great! Sure the backlight isnt the best in the market if you really squint on a completely white screen but for the purpose it serves me (gaming/movies) its perfectly fine. Its hard to find a 165hz 1440p 32" monitor for this price (in my local market anyway).

    One gripe though is it takes ages for the monitor to wake up. From the time signal is given to when an image appears on the screen.

    I had doubts originally with Gigabyte and how much money I was about to sink in, but it was all good in the end. Admittedly my experience seems rare, or just nobody bothers sharing positive experiences.
    Reply