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Pixio PXC325 32-inch Curved 165 Hz Gaming Monitor Review: Big Screen, Small Price

The Pixio PXC325 delivers a large, curved screen and 165 Hz at an attractive price point.

Pixio PXC325
(Image: © Pixio)

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking

Our grayscale and gamma tests use Calman calibration software from Portrait Displays. We describe our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

I stuck with the PXC325’s User picture mode because it’s the only way to retain control of all image parameters. Out of the box, it has a very cool grayscale which you can plainly see in the first chart. A blue tint is visible in all but the very darkest images. It’s not a huge issue but one that should be corrected. Gamma is very good, with tight tracking near the 2.2 standard. Should one desire a brighter or darker image, the gamma presets are accurate to their labels (set 2.0, and you get 2.0).

Calibration proved a challenge because the RGB sliders are not terribly precise. I had to accept a compromise by leaving 100% brightness with a blue error. The other steps have no visible errors. Though 2.43dE is acceptable, but it is not quite as good as with most other gaming monitors. My adjustments left gamma unchanged, which is a good thing.

Comparisons

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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Given the low price points of these monitors, some out-of-the-box grayscale errors are expected, but the PXC325 is near the bottom. 7.54dE isn’t terrible, but other screens are a little better. All the monitors improve significantly with calibration, but the Pixio is still in last place. However, 2.43dE is acceptable performance.

Luckily, gamma tracking is very good, as its 0.10 range of values and 0.9% deviation are among the best any monitor can boast. This means all that contrast is put to good use. Details in every part of the image pop right out, creating the impression of a three-dimensional picture.

Color Gamut Accuracy

Our color gamut and volume testing use Portrait Displays’ Calman software. For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here.

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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

The default color chart looks a bit askew at first glance, but that is due to the very blue white point I noted earlier. All the saturation targets are on or close to standard, and the hue errors should be fixed with a grayscale calibration.

Though the 100% white point is still a touch cool, all color targets are in contact with their boxes except for green. That primary is a bit under-saturated but no more so than nearly every extended color monitor I’ve tested, which is excellent performance.

Comparisons

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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Pixio PXC325

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

All these budget-friendly monitors deliver good color accuracy. The PXC325 is solidly in third place with 2.11dE. Though the Monoprice screens cross the visible threshold of 3dE, their errors are minor. None of these displays will disappoint in the color department.

All the monitors offer extended gamuts except for the Monoprice 40778. That one is strictly sRGB. The PXC325 delivers respectable DCI-P3 coverage of 86.9%, which is average for all wide gamut screens. While it fully covers the red and blue primaries, it comes up short in green which is not unusual. There is no way to reduce the gamut to sRGB size so that volume is high. If you use a PXC325 for color-critical work, a software lookup profile will be required.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.