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Razer Raptor 27 Review: Best-Looking Gaming Monitor

The Raptor 27 is a stunning first effort gaming monitor for Razer, combining high style and excellent performance in a solidly built package that’ll be the envy of fellow gamers.

Editor's Choice
(Image: © Razer)

 To read about our monitor tests in-depth, check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test Monitors and TVs. We cover brightness and contrast testing on page two. 

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

To see how the Raptor 27 stacks up against the competition, we’ve brought in four DisplayHDR 400-certified monitors: the Aorus CV27F, Aorus CV27Q, Acer Nitro XV273K and Acer Predator XB273K. We’ve also included the ViewSonic Elite XG350R-C ultra-wide with HDR10.

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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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According to our testing, the Raptor 27 won’t quite hit 400 nits in SDR mode. But that’s not a problem unless you plan to use it outdoors or in an extremely sunlit room; 371.9 nits is plenty of output. The monitor gives you a narrow range of control over the backlight, however. With brightness set to 0, it still put out 100 nits. In a totally dark room, that’s fatiguing. We’d prefer a minimum brightness closer to 50 nits.

The Raptor 27 has the best black level among the other IPS panels here, and it manages just nearly 1,042:1 contrast, which is respectable. As usual, the contrast awards go the monitors with VA panels, which typically have much deeper blacks.

After Calibration to 200 nits

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After calibration (see our recommended settings), the IPS screens are visually indistinguishable. While the image still paled in comparison to VA monitors, the Raptor achieved a contrast ratio of 1,027.5:1, and anything over 1,000:1 is a good result. Remember, this is strictly an SDR test (HDR results are on page 4).

The Razer’s ANSI result is about average when compared to other IPS monitors. Our sample showed slight hotspots in the upper-left and lower-right corners, which lowered the score a little. Overall, though, the image was solid with good depth and dimension. Color was vibrant too, thanks to that huge color gamut.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How We Test Monitors

MORE: All Monitor Content

  • Brad1
    Why any monitor above bottom tier would be lacking a VESA mount is beyond me. Pass.
    Reply
  • Ninjawithagun
    HDR400 is a joke and shouldn't even exist. For a true HDR experience, HDR1000 is the milestone for which all HDR monitors should be measured.
    Reply
  • BrushyBill
    What panel does this Monitor actually use?
    Reply
  • sizzling
    BrushyBill said:
    What panel does this Monitor actually use?
    IPS
    Reply
  • sizzling
    Barely any better than monitors selling for £200 less. That’s Razer branding.
    Reply
  • BrushyBill
    sizzling said:
    Barely any better than monitors selling for £200 less. That’s Razer branding.
    Yeah I get that. I'm personally not a fan of Razer. I just wanted to know if anyone knew the specific Panel they used for this thing.
    Reply