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Thermal Paste Comparison, Part Two: 39 Products Get Tested

Pastes: Just For Fun

Toothpaste

I made the mistake of buying a premium toothpaste with blue stripes through it. A cheap white paste would have probably fared better. Yes, you can use this stuff as a thermal compound, though its long-term stability is questionable and we wouldn't recommend it for overclocking. If all of the shops around you are closed, though, and you want to play a little Battlefield 4 on a new machine, you could probably get by for a couple of days.

Toothpaste
CPU Water Cooling, High Pressure41.8 ΔT (22 °C ambient)
CPU Air Cooling, High Pressure48.7 ΔT (22 °C ambient)
CPU Air Cooling, Low Pressure49.1 ΔT (22 °C ambient)
GPU CoolingNot measurable (overheats)
Electrically ConductiveSlightly (depending on composition)
Viscosity2 (1-10, lower numbers mean easier to use)
Ease of Use9 (1-10, higher numbers mean easier to use)
Application HintsThis paste seems best suited for the "lentil ball" method, but should be used only in emergencies

Denture Adhesive

If you don't brush your teeth but do live with your grandma, denture adhesive could stand in for toothpaste during those same couple of days. Again, this is not a long-term solution. But then again, neither were grandma’s teeth (or yours, if you don't grab some toothpaste). Be careful with this adhesive. After burn-in, the cooler may stick to the heat spreader and prove hard to remove.

Denture Adhesive
CPU Water Cooling, High Pressure38.2 ΔT (22 °C ambient)
CPU Air Cooling, High Pressure43.5 ΔT (22 °C ambient)
CPU Air Cooling, Low Pressure45.2 ΔT (22 °C ambient)
GPU Cooling85.5 ΔT (22 °C ambient)
Electrically ConductiveNo
Viscosity4 (1-10, lower numbers mean easier to use)
Ease of Use7 (1-10, higher numbers mean easier to use)
Application HintsThis paste seems best suited for the "lentil ball" method, but should be used only in emergencies