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XPG Core Reactor 750W Power Supply Review

The XPG Core Reactor 750 is a high-performance PSU, compatible with the newest and toughest requirements of the ATX spec.

XPG Core Reactor 750W
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

Our Verdict

The XPG Core Reactor 750 is a fine PSU offered at a high price, though. With the same amount, there are tough competitors.

For

  • Full power at 47 degrees Celsius
  • Efficient and silent
  • Good transient response
  • Long hold-up time
  • Compatible with the alternative sleep mode
  • Fully modular

Against

  • Expensive
  • Not so tight load regulation at +12V

The XPG Core Reactor 750 offers high performance, but doesn't beat the performance levels of either the Corsair RM750x and the more modern RM750. The Core Reactor 750 provides alternative sleep mode support and the super-high efficiency at light loads, but if you don't care about those things, he RM750x is a more affordable option. Compared to the RM750,  the XPG unit uses more reputable parts, but both PSUs promise at least 10 years of longevity and are backed by 10 year warranties. 

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Product Photos

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Along with the similar capacity Corsair RM unit, the XPG Core Reactor 750 is among the very few power supplies fully compatible with the strict requirements of the new ATX specifications, which apply from 2020. Those requirements include compatibility with alternative sleep mode and higher than 70% efficiency at only 2% of the max-rated-capacity load. The hardware changes necessary to achieve the requirements above notably increase the production cost, and this is why all XPG Core Reactor models have stiff prices.

The XPG Core Reactor 750 features super-compact dimensions, thanks to its 140mm depth. This doesn't allow the installation of a 135mm or 140mm fan, so a smaller one, measuring 120mm across, had to be used instead.  

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Product Photos

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Specifications

Manufacturer (OEM)

CWT

Max. DC Output

750W

Efficiency

80 PLUS Gold, ETA-A (88-91%)

Noise

LAMBDA-A (20-25 dB[A])

Modular

✓ (Fully)

Intel C6/C7 Power State Support

Operating Temperature (Continuous Full Load)

0 - 50°C

Over Voltage Protection

Under Voltage Protection

Over Power Protection

Over Current (+12V) Protection

Over Temperature Protection

Short Circuit Protection

Surge Protection

Inrush Current Protection

Fan Failure Protection

No Load Operation

Cooling

120mm Fluid Dynamic Bearing Fan (HA1225H12F-Z)

Semi-Passive Operation

Dimensions (W x H x D)

150 x 85 x 140mm

Weight

1.41 kg (3.11 lb)

Form Factor

ATX12V v2.4, EPS 2.92

Warranty

10 Years

Power Specifications

Rail3.3V5V12V5VSB-12V
Max. PowerAmps222262.530.3
Watts120750153.6
Total Max. Power (W)750

Cables and Connectors

Modular CablesCable CountConnector Count (Total)GaugeIn Cable Capacitors
ATX connector 20+4 pin (650mm)1116-20AWGNo
4+4 pin EPS12V (650mm)2216AWGNo
6+2 pin PCIe (650mm+150mm)2416-18AWGNo
6+2 pin PCIe (650mm)2216AWGNo
SATA (500mm+145mm+145mm+145mm)31218AWGNo
4-pin Molex (500mm+150mm+150mm+150mm)1418AWGNo
AC Power Cord (1400mm) - C13 coupler1118AWG-

There are no in-cable caps, which is good news for all users since it makes the cable routing and management processes, easier. The number of cables and connectors is satisfactory, and the same goes for cable length. Also, the distance between the peripheral connectors is adequate at 145-150mm. 

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Cable Photos

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Component Analysis

We strongly encourage you to have a look at our PSUs 101 article, which provides valuable information about PSUs and their operation, allowing you to better understand the components we're about to discuss.

General Data-
Manufacturer (OEM)CWT
PCB TypeDouble Sided
Primary Side-
Transient Filter4x Y caps, 2x X caps, 2x CM chokes, 1x MOV
Inrush ProtectionNTC Thermistor & Relay
Bridge Rectifier(s)2x GBU1506 (600V, 15A @ 100°C)
APFC MOSFETs2x On Semiconductor FCPF165N65S3L1 (650V, 12.3A @ 100°C, 0.165Ohm) & 1x SPN5003 FET (for reduced no-load consumption)
APFC Boost Diode1x Power Integrations QH08TZ600 (600V, 8A @ 95°C)
Hold-up Cap(s)1x Nippon Chemi-Con (420V, 560uF, 2,000h @ 105°C, KMR)
Main Switchers2x On Semiconductor FCPF165N65S3L1 (650V, 12.3A @ 100°C, 0.165Ohm)
APFC ControllerChampion CM6500UNX
Resonant ControllerChampion CU6901V
TopologyPrimary side: Half-Bridge & LLC converter
Secondary side: Synchronous Rectification & DC-DC converters
Secondary Side-
+12V MOSFETs6x International Rectifier IRFH7004PBF (40V, 164A @ 100°C, 1.4mOhm)
5V & 3.3VDC-DC Converters: 2x Excelliance Mos Corp EMB04N03HR (30V, 45A @ 100°C, 4mOhm) & 2x Excelliance Mos Corp EMB02N03HR (30V, 100A @ 100°C, 1.7mOhm)
PWM Controllers: ANPEC APW7159C
Filtering Capacitors

Electrolytic: 8x Nippon Chemi-Con (4-10,000h @ 105°C, KY),1x Nippon Chemi-Con  (1-5,000h @ 105°C, KZE), 2x Nichicon (2-5,000h @ 105°C, HD), 1x Nichicon (1,000h @ 105°C, VY)
Polymer: 19x FPCAP, 6x United Chemi-Con

Supervisor ICIN1S313I-SAG
Fan ModelHang Hua HA1225H12F-Z (120mm, 12V, 0.58A, Fluid Dynamic Bearing Fan)
5VSB Circuit-
RectifierSilan Microelectronics SVF4N65RDTR FET (650V, 2.5A @ 100°C, 2.7Ohm) & 1x PS1045L SBR (45V, 10A)
Standby PWM ControllerOn-BrightOB5282CP
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Overall Photos

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This is a modern platform provided by Channel Well Technology. Besides quality filtering caps, it also uses the fresh Champion resonant controller, which supports burst mode operation (CWT calls it kick mode). In this mode, the LLC converter turns off and then starts again to increase efficiency under super-light loads. 

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Transient filter

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The transient filter is complete, including also an MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor). This small and inexpensive part, blocks the voltage surges coming from the grid, protecting both the power supply and the system that it feeds with power. 

The inrush current protection is handled by an NTC thermistor and a bypass relay, which disconnects it from the circuit, once the PSU is in operation. 

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Bridge rectifiers

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There are two bridge rectifiers, which can handle up to 30A combined. 

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APFC converter

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The APFC converter utilizes an SPN5003 FET for reduced no-load consumption. The specific part indeed does a good job, since the vampire power is very low, in this platform.

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Main FETs and primary transformer

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A pair of On Semiconductor FETs, arranged in a half-bridge topology, are the primary switching FETs. There is also an LLC converter for decreased energy losses. Thanks to the Champion CU6901V resonant controller, the LLC converter misses some switching cycles at super-light loads, to decrease power losses and increase efficiency. This allows for higher than 70% efficiency at only 2%, of the PSU's max-rated-capacity, load. 

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12V FETs and VRMs

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Six 6x International Rectifier IRFH7004PBF FETs handle the +12V FETs. The heat sinks used to cool them down are tiny, but each of those FETs can handle up to 164A at 100°C, so they are highly overrated, meaning that they won't have a problem handling this platform's max load.

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Filtering caps

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The majority of electrolytic caps belong to a very good line (Chemi-Con, KY) with a high lifetime. There is only one Chemi-Con KZE which is notably inferior to KY members and three Nichicon caps. CWT also used a high number of polymer caps in this platform. 

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Modular board front

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There are lots of polymer caps at the face of the modular board. 

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5VSB Circuit

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The 5VSB circuit uses a FET on its primary side, while the regulation on the secondary side is handled by an SBR. It achieves high efficiency.

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Soldering quality

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The soldering quality is good and the sames goes for the PCB's quality.

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Cooling fan

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The 120mm Hong Hua fan uses a fluid dynamic bearing for low noise output and increased longevity.

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  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Excellent PSU , thanks Aris!
    Reply
  • Duncan Idaho
    Thanks for this complete review.

    But I think this review fails to catch the point that makes this PSU unique: its depth is only 140mm.

    Very few PSUs are able to provide 750W with such shallow depth, and no one does with such a good quality. This is a very rare feat. Cases with little space and most mini-ITX build can benefit from this PSU, I think this should be mentioned.

    Corsair RM-X, with >160mm is the main opponent thorough the review. Although It's fair to compare both PSU's, but we should mention what those 20mm extra do for, example, quiet operation. Corsair RM-X is no contender in this... "space" (no pun intended).
    Reply
  • escksu
    Nay, I don't consider CWT to be the same tier as Seasonic or Superflower. At this price, I rather go for Seasonic. If XPG decides to use Flextronics or Delta, then I am on!!
    Reply
  • reghir
    Well Amazon is now showing $118.49 making this cheaper than the RM750x , must have read this article :)
    10 left as of this posting. Newegg out of stock.
    https://www.amazon.com/XPG-Reactor-750Watt-Certified-COREREACTOR750G-BKCUS/dp/B07ZRWYMNW/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=XPG+CORE+Reactor+750Watt+80&qid=1581816551&s=electronics&sr=1-1
    Reply