Skip to main content

Corsair One a100 Packs 16-Core AMD Ryzen CPU in a Compact Gaming Desktop

Corsair One a100

(Image credit: Corsair)

Corsair has finally navigated into AMD waters again. Today, the company listed the Corsair One a100, its first AMD Ryzen-powered gaming PC that hails from the One series.

The new desktop leverages the core-heavy AMD Ryzen 3000-series (Matisse) desktop CPUs. While the Matisse family has many Zen 2 members, Corsair only taps the two fastest models, the AMD Ryzen 9 3900X and Ryzen 9 3950X

The Ryzen 9 3900X has 12 CPU cores and 24 threads and ticks with a 3.8 GHz base clock and 4.6 GHz boost clock. The Ryzen 9 3950X is the flagship 16-core, 32-thread part and checks in with a 3.5 GHz base clock and 4.7 GHz boost clock. The two 7nm processors boast native support for the PCIe 4.0 interface and DDR4-3200 RAM modules.

Corsair One a100 Specs

Corsair is currently offering the One a100 in three different configurations.

Corsair One a100Corsair One a100Corsair One a100
SKUCS-9020012-NACS-9020011-NACS-9020010-NA
CPUAMD Ryzen 9 3950XAMD Ryzen 9 3900XAMD Ryzen 9 3900X
RAMVengeance LPX DDR4-3200 32GB (2 x 16GB)Vengeance LPX DDR4-3200 32GB (2 x 16GB)Vengeance LPX DDR4-3200 32GB (2 x 16GB)
Graphics CardNvidia GeForce RTX 2080 TiNvidia GeForce RTX 2080 TiNvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Super
Primary StorageCorsair Force MP600 1TBCorsair Force MP600 1TBCorsair Force MP600 500GB
Secondary Storage2TB 5400 RPM 2.5-inch HDD2TB 5400 RPM 2.5-inch HDD2TB 5400 RPM 2.5-inch HDD
Power SupplyCorsair SF600Corsair SF600Corsair SF600
Price$3,999.99$3,599.99$2,999.99

An unidentified Mini-ITX X570 motherboard lives inside the Corsair One a100's compact PC case, which measures 7.9 x 6.8 x 15 inches (200 x 172.5 x 380mm). Being a Corsair-branded product, the gaming PC utilizes the company's own products wherever possible.

The Ryzen 9 3950X model lands with a Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics card, a Corsair Force MP600 1TB SSD and a 2.5-inch 5,400 RPM hard drive that's 1TB in size.

On the contrary, the Ryzen 9 3900X model has the option to feature an Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Super or GeForce RTX 2080 Ti with either a Corsair Force MP600 500GB or 1TB SSD, complemented with the same 1TB 2.5-inch hard drive. 

Regardless of the configuration, the desktop uses liquid cooling to keep the Ryzen processor and Nvidia graphics card at bay. All configurations also come with 32GB (2x 16GB) of Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3200 memory. 

The gaming PC's other specifications include a Corsair SF600 80 Plus Gold certified power supply Gigabit Ethernet networking, Wi-Fi 6 and Bluetooth 5.0 connectivity. 

The case's front panel supplies two USB 3.1 Gen 1 ports, a 3.5mm combo jack for headphones and microphones and a HDMI 2.0a port. The backside of the case houses three USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-A ports, one USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C port, four USB 3.1 Gen 1 ports, three 3.5mm audio jacks and three DisplayPort outputs.

The Ryzen 9 3950X model of the Corsair One a100 retails for $4,000. The Ryzen 9 3900X configuration with the GeForce RTX 2080 Super and GeForce RTX 2080 Ti costs $3,000 and $3,600 respectively.

  • spongiemaster
    Why is the pricing so weird? It costs $600 to replace a 500GB NVME with a 1TB NVME and nothing else going from low model to mid model. Then it costs only an additional $400 to replace the 2080 Super with a 2080Ti AND replace the 3900x with a 3950X? The retail price difference between those 2 pairs is about $700 at lowest.
    Reply
  • keith12
    spongiemaster said:
    Why is the pricing so weird? It costs $600 to replace a 500GB NVME with a 1TB NVME and nothing else going from low model to mid model. Then it costs only an additional $400 to replace the 2080 Super with a 2080Ti AND replace the 3900x with a 3950X? The retail price difference between those 2 pairs is about $700 at lowest.

    Yeah, spotted that too! $600 for an extra 0.5TB as far as I can see. Must be a typo.
    Reply
  • deksman
    keith12 said:
    Yeah, spotted that too! $600 for an extra 0.5TB as far as I can see. Must be a typo.

    A typo?
    Not necessarily.
    These systems with maxed out specs tend to cost a fortune for changing some basic stuff.
    The OEM's think of it like a price premium product and something people will actually pay for.

    If you find the initial configuration affordable, then just get that and upgrade individual components yourself.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    Secondary Storage2TB 5400 RPM 2.5-inch HDD
    A $4,000 computer and they put a low-end laptop drive in it, alongside a needlessly high-end SSD. What's the purpose of that slow drive supposed to be? I don't think anyone would want to install games to it, so I guess it's just for bulk storage. It seems like they could have easily slapped a much faster 2TB SATA SSD in there for the secondary storage, as some models can be had for around $200, only about 5% of the total cost of the system. Cut the NVMe boot drive back to a lower-end model, and the total cost of components wouldn't increase by much.
    Reply
  • Nemesia
    You can build something better than this for around 2700.
    Reply
  • Gillerer
    keith12 said:
    Yeah, spotted that too! $600 for an extra 0.5TB as far as I can see. Must be a typo.

    There is the 2080 Ti instead of the 2080 Super, which accounts for most of the price difference.
    Reply
  • Gillerer
    Nemesia said:
    You can build something better than this for around 2700.

    But is it as compact?
    Does it cool two radiators (effectively) using a single fan?
    Does it look as good?
    If your case is compact, do you relish in working in a cramped case to fit in two AIOs or a custom loop?

    These kinds of special pre-builts are - in my opinion - the only kind that are worth anything. Purchasing a normal-size air-cooled computer, you're better off paying your local computer shop to build it for you.
    Reply
  • Rockguy40
    Gillerer said:
    But is it as compact?
    Does it cool two radiators (effectively) using a single fan?
    Does it look as good?
    If your case is compact, do you relish in working in a cramped case to fit in two AIOs or a custom loop?

    These kinds of special pre-builts are - in my opinion - the only kind that are worth anything. Purchasing a normal-size air-cooled computer, you're better off paying your local computer shop to build it for you.
    This! The corsair one is the only pre-built I'd happily buy. It's well put together and really small (unlike certain sff's)
    Reply
  • keith12
    Gillerer said:
    There is the 2080 Ti instead of the 2080 Super, which accounts for most of the price difference.
    Aha! When article was first put up, the mid unit also had a 2080 Super. Methinks there's been some slick editing done to make a fool of me! :tearsofjoy::p

    It would make a lot of sense then given the upgrade in SSD and GPU.
    Reply