Gigabyte's new trio of Aorus QD-OLED gaming monitors ship in April — 1440p or 4K at up to 360 Hz

Aorus FO32U2P
(Image credit: Gigabyte)

OLED panels are becoming more commonplace in the gaming monitor field, and Gigabyte is flexing its muscle with the debut of three new offerings to expand its lineup. We’ve already discussed the Aorus FO32U2P, but the FO32U2 and the FO27Q3 will also join it. According to product listings on Newegg, all three monitors will go on sale on April 30.

The Aorus FO32U2P is a 32-inch QD-OLED monitor with a 4K resolution and 240 Hz refresh rate. It supports HDMI 2.1 and DisplayPort 2.1 connectivity (UHBR 20), VESA ClearMR 13000 and DisplayHDR True Black 400 certifications, along with 99 percent coverage of DCI-P3. Also included are AMD FreeSync Premium Pro support, an integrated KVM switch, and a height-adjustable stand.

Aorus FO32U2P

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

The Aorus FO32U2P is shadowed by the Aorus FO32U2, which initially seems like a carbon copy regarding specs. However, upon closer inspection, you’ll notice that the FO32U2 doesn’t support DisplayPort 2.1. Instead, it falls back to the tried-and-true DisplayPort 1.4 standard. As far as we can tell, this is the only spec difference between the two monitors.

The final slice from Gigabyte’s QD-OLED Aorus pie is the Aorus FO27Q3, which has a smaller 27-inch panel. The smaller panel also means that resolution takes a step back, dropping to 2560 x 1440. However, that resolution reduction also allowed Gigabyte to crank the refresh rate to 360 Hz versus 240 Hz for its 4K siblings. VESA ClearMR 13000 and DisplayHDR True Black 400 certification remain, and you still get FreeSync Premium Pro support. A KVM switch is included, and like the FO32U2, it only supports DisplayPort 1.4 and HDMI 2.1.

Aorus FO27Q3

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

Newegg lists the 32-inch Aorus FO32U2P for $1,199 and the FO32U2 at $1,099, respectively. The 27-inch Aorus FO27Q3 retails for $799.99. The monitors are scheduled to ship by April 30.

All three monitors are covered by Gigabyte’s new enhanced three-year warranty covering burn-in. While many manufacturers employ hardware and software mitigations to reduce the occurrence of screen burn-in, offering a lofty warranty is definitely a pro-consumer move. Gigabyte’s new warranty policy now matches coverage provided by rivals Asus and MSI. However, new technology on the horizon could potentially eliminate screen burn-in.

Brandon Hill

Brandon Hill is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware. He has written about PC and Mac tech since the late 1990s with bylines at AnandTech, DailyTech, and Hot Hardware. When he is not consuming copious amounts of tech news, he can be found enjoying the NC mountains or the beach with his wife and two sons.

  • DougMcC
    Wow, I think Aorus FO32U2P finally checked the last box I have been waiting for the last couple of years with the dp2.1 support.
    Reply
  • gg83
    It sucks buying pc monitors. By far the hardest component for a build to pick. At least in my opinion. Oleds are so beautiful and I got the acer preditor. $800 for a monitor is hard the justify, especially since the tech is constantly improving. I'm happy with the screen but every time I think about the price I get a little buyers remorse.
    Reply
  • helper800
    gg83 said:
    It sucks buying pc monitors. By far the hardest component for a build to pick. At least in my opinion. Oleds are so beautiful and I got the acer preditor. $800 for a monitor is hard the justify, especially since the tech is constantly improving. I'm happy with the screen but every time I think about the price I get a little buyers remorse.
    Personally I can justify spending a ton on the monitor. If you are going to spend 5 years looking at a computer output it mind as well look nice. No point in building a 2k dollar PC and then staring at a 90 dollar 23 inch tn 1080p panel with terrible colors, accuracy, and low brightness.
    Reply
  • truerock
    DougMcC said:
    Wow, I think Aorus FO32U2P finally checked the last box I have been waiting for the last couple of years with the dp2.1 support.
    But most importantly, this is UHBR20, 80 Gb/sec. There is going to be a lot of UHBR10 40 Gb/sec DP2.1 this year.
    Also, you should read the other Tom's article about DP2.1 cables:
    https://www.tomshardware.com/monitors/displayport-21-has-a-serious-issue-with-uhbr-certified-cables-perhaps-thats-why-nvidia-opted-to-stick-with-dp14-on-the-rtx-40-series
    Reply
  • thestryker
    DougMcC said:
    Wow, I think Aorus FO32U2P finally checked the last box I have been waiting for the last couple of years with the dp2.1 support.
    Now you just have to wait for a video card that supports UHBR20! (I'm sure they're coming I just hate what a mess the DP2.1 spec is)
    Reply
  • helper800
    thestryker said:
    Now you just have to wait for a video card that supports UHBR20! (I'm sure they're coming I just hate what a mess the DP2.1 spec is)
    Don't the AMD 7900 XT and 7900 XTX series cards support DP 2.1 UHBR?
    Reply
  • thestryker
    helper800 said:
    Don't the AMD 7900 XT and 7900 XTX series cards support DP 2.1 UHBR?
    They support 13.5, but I believe their professional cards do support 20 and may be the only cards that do period.
    Reply
  • helper800
    thestryker said:
    They support 13.5, but I believe their professional cards do support 20 and may be the only cards that do period.
    As far as I am aware, the cards support any of the DP 2.1 specs and it's the cable that determines the data rates available from the cards? I am not sure. This is not an area I am an expert in.
    Reply
  • thestryker
    helper800 said:
    As far as I am aware, the cards support any of the DP 2.1 specs and it's the cable that determines the data rates available from the cards? I am not sure. This is not an area I am an expert in.
    Definitely not how it works unfortunately as that would be convenient. It takes support from every side: display engine, cable and then the screen itself. The display engine has to be capable of driving the full bandwidth and AMD's is capped at 54Gbps (13.5) and Intel is 40Gbps (10).

    HDMI side is really no better spec wise, I believe every video card supports the full 48Gbps, but not all displays do. LG on one of their more recent televisions dropped to something like 40Gbps.
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    helper800 said:
    Don't the AMD 7900 XT and 7900 XTX series cards support DP 2.1 UHBR? As far as I am aware, the cards support any of the DP 2.1 specs and it's the cable that determines the data rates available from the cards? I am not sure.

    No, actually all the consumer Radeon RX 7000 series support DisplayPort 2.1 via UHBR 13.5 data rate implementation, thus giving maximum display bandwidth of 52.2Gbps.

    But AMD's latest PRO series/proviz cards like the Radeon Pro W7900 and W7800 support the standard’s highest data rate: UHBR 20.
    Reply