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ASRock’s Radeon RX 6400 Mini-ITX Card Could Come to Retail

AMD
(Image credit: AMD)

When AMD introduced its low-end Radeon RX 6400/6500-series graphics cards earlier this year, the company noted that the Radeon RX 6400 is not meant for retail and will only be available to large OEMs. But someone has to make such boards, and a custom Radeon RX 6400 graphics card from ASRock has been added to the EEC database. The key advantage of the adapter is that it consumes only about 53W and is therefore compatible with virtually all PCs.

A filing in the Eurasian Economic Commission (opens in new tab) (EEC) customs database indicated that ASRock has developed the RX6400 CLI 4G graphics board, which stands for the Radeon RX 6400 Challenger ITX (as noticed by VideoCardz). Since some of AMD's official slides show short, low-profile Radeon RX 6400 graphics cards, it's not surprising that a partner is prepping something similar — though we would normally expect partners to use AMD's reference design with some changes to optimize costs.

AMD's codenamed Navi 24 GPU was primarily designed with notebooks in mind, but it has also been brought to the desktop discrete market in the form of the Radeon RX 6500 XT and Radeon RX 6400. Companies often tend to keep entry-level notebook GPUs low profile, which is why things like Nvidia's GP108 and the GeForce GT 1010 hardly ever reach the hands of reviewers. But severe graphics cards shortages and higher prices likely helped AMD reconsider its entry-level graphics processor and marketing.

For what it's worth, the Radeon RX 6500 XT isn't a particularly good gaming solution for 2022: it delivers similar performance to the RX 5500 XT 4GB card that it's meant to replace, and trails the 8GB variant by quite a bit. In fact, even the FP32 compute throughput of the Radeon RX 6500 XT is very similar to the RX 5500 XT. The former offers up to 5.77 TFLOPs, whereas the latter can boast with up to 5.2 TFLOPS.

Being a cut-down version of the RX 6500 XT, both in GPU cores and clock speeds, we can expect the Radeon RX 6400 to be quite a bit slower. With 768 stream processors clocked at up to 2321 MHz, this GPU can only provide up to 3.57 FP32 TFLOPS. That's of course a lot better than the GeForce GT 1010 (0.75 TFLOPS), but on paper it doesn't even match the GeForce GTX 1060 3GB from 2016. Unless it shows up at retail with incredibly attractive pricing (like around $100), it's unlikely to show up on our list of the best graphics cards.

ASRock's RX6400 CLI 4G board carries the Challenger brand, which may be an indicator that it is aimed at the channel market, though it's certainly not a proof of anything. Keep in mind that since anyone can add pretty much everything to the EEC customs database, the listing itself does not necessarily prove that ASRock is indeed preparing to import its Radeon RX 6400 Challenger ITX into Russia or Kazakhstan. It's possible the product is only meant for the bottomless market of China, and we're unlikely to see standalone RX 6400 cards for sale in the US, though anything's possible in the current GPU market.

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • King_V
    I suspect it'll show up on the best GPUs board. Strictly under the new "you can actually buy it" category.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    Anything with 4GB on it right now automatically costs ~$100 to manufacture and is unlikely to retail for less than $150... unless it uses DDR4/5 instead of GDDR6, then you can shave $30 or so.
    Reply
  • artk2219
    Admin said:
    Is the Radeon RX 6400 coming to retail, after all? And if it does, how much will it cost and who will want it?

    AsRock’s Radeon RX 6400 Mini-ITX Card Could Come to Retail : Read more

    Its still a nice step up from a 1050 ti which would be its direct competitor, so long as the price is right and its on a pcie-4 setup it should make a nice upgrade from an igpu. Ideally if they can make it into a single slot low profile card, it should fit anywhere and it would allow you to turn any ho hum office pc into a little esports gamer thatll also do 1080p low to high depending on the title. Had times been normal and the 6500 xt and 6400 were positioned as the replacements for the RX 560 and RX 550 that they cleary are then they would have been very welcome cards in the sub $120 space
    Reply
  • ezst036
    The GPU shortage will get better when Intel releases Arc GPUs wide. More product availability will have the natural effect.(especially once Intel starts using its own capacity instead of TSMC)

    The GPU shortage will probably end some time after Intel releases Bonanza Mine. Mining-specific chips are usually much faster than GPUs for the task. There's just no need for miners and gamers to fight over the exact same product lines.

    https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-to-unveil-bitcoin-mining-bonanza-mine-asic-at-chip-conference
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    ezst036 said:
    The GPU shortage will get better when Intel releases Arc GPUs wide. More product availability will have the natural effect.(especially once Intel starts using its own capacity instead of TSMC)
    Until Intel's own fabs get up to speed though, Intel's GPUs come out of the same limited supply as everything else coming out of TSMC's N7/N7P/N6 process, which means that for every GPU wafer Intel gets, someone else, possibly AMD, has one less wafer coming out. Fabbing more stuff on an already supply-limited process won't help overall supply much.

    ezst036 said:
    The GPU shortage will probably end some time after Intel releases Bonanza Mine. Mining-specific chips are usually much faster than GPUs for the task. There's just no need for miners and gamers to fight over the exact same product lines.
    All Bitcoin mining is already done on ASIC miners as BTC hasn't been profitable on GPUs for years already. Intel jumping into that fray won't make things any better for GPUs. It may arguably make things worse by burning wafers on BTC mining hardware instead of making more GPUs.
    Reply
  • prtskg
    I hope manufacturers show more love to small GPUs. Many people buy GPU just for light work and not for gaming. So even 4GB cards are welcome to such people. More efficient cards are always welcome.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    prtskg said:
    I hope manufacturers show more love to small GPUs. Many people buy GPU just for light work and not for gaming. So even 4GB cards are welcome to such people. More efficient cards are always welcome.
    The problem with lower-end GPUs than 50(0) tier is that you are getting close to IGP performance territory where it makes little to no sense to bother with a dGPU. If you want power-efficient, effectively zero footprint low-cost for non-gaming, non-GPGPU use, you cannot beat baseline IGPs and it looks like AMD will make it standard on AM5 just like Intel has for the last 10 years.
    Reply
  • prtskg
    InvalidError said:
    The problem with lower-end GPUs than 50(0) tier is that you are getting close to IGP performance territory where it makes little to no sense to bother with a dGPU. If you want power-efficient, effectively zero footprint low-cost for non-gaming, non-GPGPU use, you cannot beat baseline IGPs and it looks like AMD will make it standard on AM5 just like Intel has for the last 10 years.
    As long as they sell CPUs (without GPU), they should sell small GPU. I understand AMD these days try to save any penny they can and invest in only those things which give them good money, still...
    Reply