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Intel's Xeon Emerald Rapids CPUs Could Wield Up To 64 Cores

Sapphire Rapids
Sapphire Rapids (Image credit: Intel)


Hardware leaker YuuKi_AnS (opens in new tab) has provided a sneak peek of what we could expect from Intel’s next-generation Xeon Emerald Rapids processors. It’s funny because Sapphire Rapids (opens in new tab) hasn’t landed, but the specifications of its successor are already hitting the rumor mill. Although the leaker claims that the specifications came from a document allegedly distributed to OEMs recently, we recommend you approach the information with an open mind.

Like Sapphire Rapids, Emerald Rapids continue to rely on the Intel 7 (rebranded 10nm Enhanced SuperFin) process node. The forthcoming data center chips will slip into the same Eagle Stream platform with the LGA4677 (Socket E) socket as Sapphire Rapids. Intel hasn’t confirmed which microarchitecture will power Emerald Rapids, though. Sapphire Rapids will come with Golden Cove cores; therefore, Emerald Rapids would probably wield Raptor Cove cores.

While Sapphire Rapids have appeared to top out at 56 cores, Emerald Rapids could push it up to 64 cores to match AMD’s EPYC processors. The problem is that Emerald Rapids will have very tough competition. AMD’s Genoa rocks up to 96 cores, whereas  Bergamo (opens in new tab), which launches in 2023, will have up to 128 cores. Intel is still behind AMD in terms of core counts.

(Image credit: YuuKi_AnS/Twitter)

Emerald Rapids' TDP may vary between 150W and 350W with excellent scalability. The processor support 1S, 2S, 4S, 8S, and higher configurations via xNC support. Four UPI 2.0 links per Emerald Rapids processor at a higher width (x24) offer transfer speeds up to 20 GT/s.

Eight-channel memory remains a feature on Emerald Rapids; however there is improved memory speed support. The processors natively support DDR5-5600 in a 1DPC setup and DDR5-4800 in a 2DPC configuration. The Eagle Stream platform will enable up to 16 DDR5 memory slots per socket. The specification sheet mentions support for 24Gb memory modules. Emerald Rapids also embraces Intel's Crow Pass Persistent Memory (Crystal Ridge 3.0) modules. Although Intel has canned its Optane memory business, Crow Pass will still make it to the market. However, the chipmaker won't develop any future Optane products beyond Crow Pass.

In terms of expansion, Emerald Rapids deliver up to 80 PCIe 5.0 lanes. The platform provides PCIe bifurcation support at x16, x8, x4, and x2 via PCIe 4.0 speeds. The Emmitsburg chipset, on the other hand, supplies 20 PCIe 3.0 lanes, 1G Ethernet for Manageability support, and an x8 DMI connection restricted to the PCIe 3.0 standard. AMD hasn't share the number of PCIe 5.0 lanes for Genoa or Bergamo. For contrast, AMD EPYC chips have been offering 128 PCIe lanes for a couple of generations now.

Unlike Sapphire Rapids, Intel is confident that Emerald Rapids will meet its 2023 deadline.

Zhiye Liu
RAM Reviewer and News Editor

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • Neilbob
    'Unlike Sapphire Rapids, Intel is confident that Emerald Rapids will meet its 2023 deadline.'

    And that right there is a nice little bit of comedy.
    Reply
  • peachpuff
    Neilbob said:
    'Unlike Sapphire Rapids, Intel is confident that Emerald Rapids will meet its 2023 deadline.'

    And that right there is a nice little bit of comedy.
    Intel: hello and thank you for the compliment, comedy is our #1 priority!
    Reply
  • escksu
    We are still seeing rendered images today instead of real product photo.....
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    'Unlike Sapphire Rapids, Intel is confident that Emerald Rapids will meet its 2023 deadline.'

    Does this imply that Sapphire Rapids has been delayed again to 2024?
    Reply
  • jeremyj_83
    Once again Intel is behind the 8 ball for RAM density. Last time they went 6 channel when the competition was going 8. Now Intel is going 8 channel when the competition is going 12. That reduction in density will make a huge difference when it comes to cloud providers and places that need a lot of RAM.
    Reply
  • closs.sebastien
    still not the real 7 nm that we are waiting for.... since 2016
    Reply
  • watzupken
    I think as the article rightly pointed out, we have not even seen Sapphire Rapids, and Intel has gone ahead to share more details of their future product. If Emerald Rapids is on schedule for 2023, basically Intel's key message to their potential buyers is, avoid Sapphire Rapids. While it is important to share details to keep buyers interested, I think Intel failed to realized that it will negatively impact sales until Emerald Rapids gets launched. And as we have observed many times of late, Intel likes to pull last minute delays, and multiple delays, which I guess will send some of their potential buyers towards AMD/ ARM (via designing their own SOC).
    Reply
  • watzupken
    spongiemaster said:
    'Unlike Sapphire Rapids, Intel is confident that Emerald Rapids will meet its 2023 deadline.'

    Does this imply that Sapphire Rapids has been delayed again to 2024?
    Delay it? They should just can it. Its too late. Looking at the timeline, it is indeed possible that Sapphire Rapids will end up with very very limited quantity just so that Intel can tick the box to say that they have delivered it. They won't admit that they failed to deliver the product, and so will squeeze something out at the very last moment. It likely going to be like their first gen 10nm Cannon Lake where we only see the smoke of the cannon fire, but don't see any cannon at all. :LOL: The product exists for a tiny window and it is gone and replaced quickly by Ice Lake.
    Reply