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Acer XG270HU 27-inch FreeSync Monitor Review

We’ve had G-Sync monitors for many months now, but AMD fans had to wait for FreeSync screens. Today we’re looking at Acer’s 27-inch QHD XG270HU.

Grayscale Tracking And Gamma Response

Our grayscale and gamma tests are described in detail here.

Aside from a bit of green in the upper brightness levels, this is a good chart. No errors are visible until the 80-percent mark when we use the Standard picture mode and Warm color temp preset.

After a few tweaks, all errors are now below three (though just barely). We had to compromise because dialing in the upper levels means creating greater errors in the darker steps. By settling for a little blue reduction in the 80, 90 and 100 points, we’re able to get the low- and mid-tones almost perfect. The average error reduction is small but noticeable to nit-pickers like us.

Here is our comparison group:

A 2.48 Delta E error level is perfectly acceptable for any gaming monitor. And most of that error is caused by the brightest part of the scale. As we said on the previous page, leaving the XG270HU unadjusted produces the highest possible contrast with only a slight reduction in color accuracy.

We’re happy with a 1.41 Delta E result, even if it's not enough to keep the Acer out of last place. Monitors in every category are getting better with each new model, and gamers can now enjoy accurate color without calibration. All of the screens here represent high quality.

Gamma Response

Gamma tracking is quite good regardless of other settings. We’re showing the 2.2 preset above. The only other choice is 1.8, which is far too light and makes the picture look washed out. This, coupled with the XG’s excellent contrast, creates plenty of image depth in all types of content.

Here is our comparison group again:

The XG270HU’s gamma tracking is almost ruler-flat. It's just edged out by the XL2430T, though. Here's the thing: you can’t actually see the difference. Both monitors look fantastic.

We calculate gamma deviation by expressing the difference from 2.2 as a percentage.

Since the gamma trace rides just above the 2.2 mark, our overall number is a hair too high at 2.28 on average, 3.64% above 2.2. Again, it’s not a difference you can actually see. Only the AOC screen has gamma errors that impact the image. That monitor’s result was a little darker at an average of 2.36.

  • rdc85
    Look goods,

    hope they can make 144hz IPS "Freesync" monitor...
    24" preferred.. 27" just to big for me..
    Reply
  • eklipz330
    "In the case of the XG270HU, its frame rate range is 30-144Hz, which means you can benefit from FreeSync down to 30 FPS."

    my god that is wonderful
    Reply
  • ubercake
    "In the case of the XG270HU, its frame rate range is 30-144Hz, which means you can benefit from FreeSync down to 30 FPS."

    my god that is wonderful
    The first freesync monitor with such a range. This is great for competition!!!

    I also like the fact these freesync monitors are not limited to a single DP input.

    Now I feel like I have a choice again. AMD corrected their FCAT issues I had been complaining about for years and now freesync? I may head back to team red with the next gen. This is good stuff. How are the drivers lately?
    Reply
  • wtfxxxgp
    Very sexy monitor. That IPS version is also supposed to be QHD... That's going to be pricey for sure, but at least it's the start of good things to come
    Reply
  • wtfxxxgp
    Look goods,

    hope they can make 144hz IPS "Freesync" monitor...
    24" preferred.. 27" just to big for me..

    Seriously? 27" 1440p is the SWEET SPOT.
    Reply
  • UncleVesper
    "In the case of the XG270HU, its frame rate range is 30-144Hz, which means you can benefit from FreeSync down to 30 FPS."

    my god that is wonderful

    It figures Tom's Hardware does not actually do a full review of their products. The FreeSync range they just took for granted in what they were told. According to GURU3D, they experienced tearing this monitor < 40 FPS, so the minimum range is NOT 30 but 40 HZ.

    http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/amd_freesync_review_with_the_acer_xb270hu_monitor,12.html
    Reply
  • UncleVesper
    Link cut off, this was the conclusion: "We did noticed on the ACER screen that at low sub 35 FPS screen tearing was back, which was disappointing. From what we learned, the ACER dynamic range starts at 40Hz, and thus so will FreeSync. If you cannot achieve such a framerate then you need to tweak image quality in such a manner that it stays above the minimum dynamic range. But FreeSync at 40+ FPS is as good as it is at 60 FPS, that is a fact."
    Reply
  • Wisecracker
    16039451 said:
    "In the case of the XG270HU, its frame rate range is 30-144Hz, which means you can benefit from FreeSync down to 30 FPS."

    my god that is wonderful

    Yup.

    The first OEMs to seriously target entry-level and 'mainstream' 30Hz+ at a respectable size and resolution are sitting on gold mines. Hopefully, it will happen sooner rather than later.

    If Intel gets behind it, it's a done deal. Being the big dog with DX12 on the immediate horizon, and with their investment made into integrated graphics, it is a natural extension to bring DP to great, inexpensive motherboards.

    I'd love to see some gaming reviews at the lower-end. Let us see the experience with a $130 APU.



    Reply
  • singemagique
    Very sexy monitor. That IPS version is also supposed to be QHD... That's going to be pricey for sure, but at least it's the start of good things to come

    Yep, the XB270HU is 1440p, IPS, 144hz, 4ms, GSync. I picked up two last month from Amazon at $738. They are excellent panels and the best monitors I have used outside of professional monitors.
    Reply
  • quilciri
    Why, oh why, oh why doesn't it have a VESA mount? You were so close to the perfect monitor, Acer.
    Reply