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Intel Xeon E5-2600 V3 Review: Haswell-EP Redefines Fast

Power Consumption Results

Intel has this cadence where its latest architectures roll out on the mobile/desktop side, and are then followed in the high-end workstation/server space. We saw the benefits of 22 nm manufacturing first from Ivy Bridge, and then with Ivy Bridge-EP. Then, Haswell integrated the platform's voltage regulation circuitry for tighter control of power on-package. Needless to say, we were expecting a notable improvement from Haswell-EP to follow some of the gains already measured using desktop-class offerings, and we got it.

Haswell-EP incorporates a number of technologies that we anticipated bettering the power consumption story. First, it brings much of the power delivery from Intel's first- and second-gen Xeon E5s on-package. Haswell-EP can control P-states on a per-core basis, allowing them to be granularly spun up and down as demand dictates. Intel claims up to 36%-lower power consumption from its Per-Core P-States (PCPS.)

Then there's DDR4 memory, which, in addition to increasing data rates, also employs a lower input voltage. In most desktops, sub-1 W savings per module doesn't mean much. In a server, however, where you might have eight DIMMs per CPU and multiple processors per node, hacking away at total platform power a few watts at a time adds up quickly.

For companies looking to upgrade from three-generation-old Westmere-EP processors, there is another major difference. The new Wellsburg PCH (Intel C610 series) runs extremely cool and can control 10 SATA-based drives using standard ports. Back when Westmere was modern, the only way to get lots of PCIe connectivity in a server for expanded storage was adding a second IOH36 chip. That component required a decent sink and plenty of airflow to cope with its heat. When two of them were in a system, they became a significant cooling consideration. Since Haswell-EP employs 40 lanes of PCIe 3.0 on-die, and is mated to a C610 PCH manufactured on a newer process, you get big platform power savings compared to pre-Sandy Bridge-EP systems. Servers sporting Westemere-EP started coming off of lease en masse in early 2014, so they're the ones most likely to be replaced by Haswell-EP.

To generate some hard data, we took our 1U Supermicro test bed and allowed it to idle with no PCIe expansion cards installed (only the on-board networking controllers were active). The results were awesome:

Remember, our Haswell-EP-based server sports two 135 W Xeon E5-2690 v3s and 16 eight-gigabyte memory modules. It also uses redundant cooling, which is great in a datacenter environment, but not particularly power-friendly. Even still, the takeaway is that the Haswell-EP-based system's idle power consumption is extremely low.

Then we fired up three instances of well-threaded tests using c-ray 1.1, sysbench CPU (prime solver), and STREAM concurrently. The results were interesting; mainly, the Xeon E5-2699 v3 drew quite a bit more power than we were expecting. Granted, in many of our performance benchmarks, those same CPUs deliver greater than 2x improvements over the first-gen Xeon E5-2690. That's what will trigger consolidation of older machines into fewer Xeon E5-2600 v3-based boxes during this refresh cycle.

  • CaptainTom
    Wonder how long it is until 18-core CPU's are utilized well in games...Maybe 2018 or 2020?
    Reply
  • dovah-chan
    Captain Tom said:
    Wonder how long it is until 18-core CPU's are utilized well in games...Maybe 2018 or 2020?

    Actually we should be trying to move away from traditional serial-styled processing and move towards parallel processing. Each core can handle only one task at a time and only utilize it's own resources by itself.

    This is unlike a GPU, where many processors utilize the same resources and perform multiple tasks at the same time. The problem is that this type of architecture is not supported at all in CPUs and Nvidia is looking for people to learn to program for parallel styled architectures.

    But this lineup of CPUs is clearly a marvel of engineering and hard work. Glad to see the server industry will truly start to benefit from the low power and finely-tuned abilities of haswell along with the recently introduced DDR4 which is optimized for low power usage as well. This, combined along with flash-based storage (aka SSDs) which also have lower power drain than the average HDD, will slash through server power bills and save companies literally billions of dollars. Technology is amazing isn't it?
    Reply
  • 2Be_or_Not2Be
    There is still a lot in games that doesn't translate well into parallel processing. A lot of gaming action only happens as a direct result of the user's input, and it usually triggers items that are dependent upon the results from another item. So parallel processing doesn't help a lot there; single-threaded performance helps more.

    However, with multiple cores, now we can have better AI and other "off-screen" items that don't necessarily always depend upon the user's direct input. There's still a lot of work to be done there, though.
    Reply
  • 2Be_or_Not2Be
    The new Haswell-EP Xeons are definitely going to help with virtualization. However, I see the high-price of DDR4 and the relative scarcity of it now as being a bit of a handicap to fast adoption, especially since that is one of the major limiting factors to how many servers you can virtualize.

    I think all of the major server vendors are going to suck up all of the major memory manufacturers DDR4 capacity for a while before the prices go down.
    Reply
  • balister
    The new Haswell-EP Xeons are definitely going to help with virtualization. However, I see the high-price of DDR4 and the relative scarcity of it now as being a bit of a handicap to fast adoption, especially since that is one of the major limiting factors to how many servers you can virtualize.

    I think all of the major server vendors are going to suck up all of the major memory manufacturers DDR4 capacity for a while before the prices go down.

    Whether it helps or hinders will ultimately depend on the VM admin. What most VM admins don't realize is that HT can actually end up degrading performance in virtual environments unless the VM admin took specific steps to use HT properly (and most do not). A lot of companies will tell you to turn off HT to increase performance because they've dealt with a lot of VM admins that don't set things up properly (a lot of VM admins over allocate which is part of the reason using HT can degrade performance, but there are other settings as well that have to be set in the Hypervisor so that the guest VMs get the resources they need).
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    14133592 said:
    Actually we should be trying to move away from traditional serial-styled processing and move towards parallel processing. Each core can handle only one task at a time and only utilize it's own resources by itself.
    This is easier said than done since there are tons of everyday algorithms, such as text/code parsing, that are fundamentally incompatible with threading. If you want to build a list or tree using threads, you usually need to split the operation to let each thread work in isolated parts of the list/tree so they do not trip over each other and waste most of their time waiting on mutexes and at the end of the build process, you have a merge process to bring everything back together which is usually not very thread-friendly if you want it to be efficient.

    In many cases, trying to convert algorithms to threads is simply more trouble than it is worth.
    Reply
  • Rob Burns
    Great to see these processors out, and overall good article. I only wish you used the same benchmark suite you had for the Haswell-E processors: 3DS Max, Adobe Premiere, After Effects, Photoshop. I'd also love to see Vray added to the mix. Not much useful benchmark data in here for 3D professionals. Some good detail on the processors themselves however.
    Reply
  • The3monitors
    Just take my money. Pls.
    Reply
  • Drejeck
    Wonder how long it is until 18-core CPU's are utilized well in games...Maybe 2018 or 2020?
    Simply never.
    A game is made by sound, logic and graphics. You may dedicate this 3 processes to a number of cores but they remain 3. As you split load some of the logic must recall who did what and where. Logic deals mainly with FPU units, while graphics with integers. GPUs are great integers number crunchers. They have to be fed by the CPU so an extra core manage data through different memories, this is where we start failing. Keeping all in one spot, with the same resources reduces need to transfer data. By implementing a whole processor with GPU, FPU, x86 and sound processor all in one package with on board memory makes for the ultimate gaming processor. As long as we render scenes with triangles we will keep using the legacy stuff. When the time will come to render scenes by pixel we will need a fraction of today's performance, and half of the texture memory (just scale the highest quality) and half of models memory. Epic is already working on that.
    Reply
  • pjkenned
    Great to see these processors out, and overall good article. I only wish you used the same benchmark suite you had for the Haswell-E processors: 3DS Max, Adobe Premiere, After Effects, Photoshop. I'd also love to see Vray added to the mix. Not much useful benchmark data in here for 3D professionals. Some good detail on the processors themselves however.

    Great points. One minor complication is that the NVIDIA GeForce Titan used in the Haswell-E review would not have fit in the 1U servers (let alone be cooled well by then.) Onboard Matrox G200eW graphics are too much of a bottleneck for the standard test suite.

    On the other hand, this platform is going to be used primarily in servers. Although there are some really nice workstation options coming, we did not have access in time for testing.

    One plus is that you can run the tests directly on your own machine by booting to a Ubuntu 14.04 LTS LiveCD, and issuing three commands. There is a video and the three simple commands here: http://linux-bench.com/howto.html That should give you a rough idea in terms of performance of your system compared to the test systems.

    Hopefully we will get some workstation appropriate platforms in the near future where we can run the standard set of TH tests. Thanks for your feedback since it is certainly on the radar.
    Reply