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Viotek GFI27QXA Review: Affordable 144Hz 4K Gaming

Colorful 4K, fast refresh, tempting price

Viotek GFI27QXA
(Image: © Viotek)

We performed all tests in the GFI27QXA’s Standard picture mode. It makes all image controls available and measures accurately out of the box. Calibration isn’tt required but we did it anyway.

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking

We describe our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

If you look very hard at a 100% white pattern, you might see a red tint. But in actual content, the image looks right on the mark. There are no visible errors at any other brightness step. Gamma runs a bit dark, but we like the presentation because all values are close to one another. Since tracking is relatively linear, you can just up the brightness while maintaining accuracy. If you really want a lighter or darker gamma, there are four additional presets to choose from.

Calibration lowers the average grayscale error, but the picture looks much the same to the naked eye. Gamma is slightly improved but again, it is only a tiny difference. This is excellent performance, especially in the GFI27QXA’s default state.

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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Viotek wins our out-of-box test by a nose over the ViewSonic. The top three displays can all be enjoyed without calibration as their grayscale errors are invisible to the naked eye. Calibration improves the average from 1.99 to 1.30dE, a worthwhile gain if you’re picky like we are.

Gamma tracking is mid-pack for the range of values test and the overall average of 2.30 puts the GFI27QXA into fifth place. This isn’t a big deal as we always prefer to see gamma err on the side of too dark rather than too light. It accentuates contrast and the visual effect can be improved by raising the brightness control.

Color Gamut Accuracy 

The GFI27QXA has only a single color gamut, DCI-P3, and it covers all of it accurately. Though we’d like to see an sRGB mode, we doubt many users will complain about this monitor’s highly saturated hues. It looks stunning, especially with Ultra HD content.

For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, please click here. 

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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

In the Standard picture mode, there are only minor hue errors in green and magenta. Red is slightly over-saturated as well. None of these errors are visible with an impressive average of 2.55dE before calibration. It doesn’t get much better than this.

Calibration makes only a tiny difference with a slight reduction in the average value but no real change to the visuals. The GFI27QXA boasts some of the best color performance we’ve seen from any gaming monitor.

Comparisons

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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GFI27QXA

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Viotek’s fifth-place finish is by no means a slight ti its performance. This group of monitors has excellent color accuracy, and all of them pretty much aced our tests. There is nothing to complain about here.

We’ve reviewed only one other monitor with greater color volume than the GFI27QXA, Acer’s professional ConceptD CP7271K, which costs more than double the price. That Viotek has also achieved good accuracy is icing on the cake. Color-critical work is no problem for this screen. We recommend a profile to ensure perfect compliance but with complete coverage of DCI-P3, this screen could work in a video post-production environment.