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Viotek GNV34DBE Gaming Monitor Review: Ultra-Wide Value King

Rocking the price to performance ratio with 144 Hz, FreeSync and HDR.

Viotek GNV34DBE
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Viotek)

We ran our grayscale, gamma and color tests in the GNV34BDE’s Standard picture mode, which makes all image controls available. The only gamut available is the native one, DCI-P3. 

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking 

We describe grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Though the GNV34BDE default color temp is called Warm, our tests showed it to be too blue. The error is visible from 40% brightness and up and made the picture look a little flat. The average Delta E (dE) of 4.5917 is a little higher than most monitors in this class. On the other hand, gamma tracked at the 2.2 setting. Aside from a slight bump (too dark) at 90% brightness, gamma stayed right on the reference line.

Calibration (second chart above) made a visible improvement in the Viotek’s white point. Now, all errors are below the visible threshold. Gamma was nearly unchanged from before. This is excellent performance, especially for the price.

Comparisons

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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

A 4.59dE was a decent default grayscale error score perhaps five or six years ago. Today’s monitors come from the factory closer to the D65 (6500K) standard. The GNV34BDE is merely okay without adjustment. We strongly recommend calibration using our recommended settings.

Gamma tracking was quite good in either case. The 2.2 preset measured correctly with only the aforementioned bump at 90% brightness. The range of values was tight at 0.18. Though that put the Viotek in last place in our comparison, it’s up against very stiff competition. A 0.45% deviation from 2.2 (actual value is 2.19) means you can expect solid image depth and good color saturation tracking.

Color Gamut Accuracy 

For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here.

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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Since the GNV34BDE’s only available color gamut is DCI-P3, we tested against that standard. By default, the magenta and cyan hues were off-target because of the grayscale errors we recorded. Red saturation was correct at the 100% mark but a bit under at 20-80%. Additionally, green fell short across the board.

Calibration (see our recommended settings) fixed the hue errors and improved the red saturation points. Blue and magenta were still slightly under-saturated, but this wasn’t visible to the naked eye. The grayscale tweaks took all color errors below the visible threshold.

Comparisons

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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Viotek GNV34DBE

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

All the monitors here delivered good color gamut accuracy, so the Viotek’s fourth place finish isn;t bad. 1.99dE is a low average error, especially considering the GNV34DBE’s price tag. As a DCI monitor, it competes with some of the best. There’s no sRGB mode available, but most users will appreciate the bonus color in their SDR games and content.

Our test showed the GNV34DBE offers 81.69% coverage of DCI-P3, which is slightly above-average for the group. sRGB coverage is over 120%, so you’ll need a software profile to engage in color-critical work. For gaming and entertainment, however, we were quite satisfied with the GNV34BDE’s color and gamut volume.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How We Test Monitors

MORE: All Monitor Content

  • Schlachtwolf
    Man is that one ugly stand.... I think is is an awesome monitor for the price but I could not look at the stand ......aaarrrggghhhh!!!!:LOL:
    Reply
  • jakjawagon
    I looked for a better place to post this but couldn't find one:

    The Tom's Hardware website uses a lot of CPU in Firefox. I don't know why it doesn't in Chrome or Edge. The forums are fine also. But if I have the homepage or any article/review open in Firefox, it uses about 30% of my CPU just sitting there.
    Reply
  • techrabbit2015
    "HDR" at 350 nits? I don't think so. That doesn't even qualify as the not-really HDR 400 spec. This is NOT an HDR monitor folks.
    Reply
  • Schlachtwolf
    techrabbit2015 said:
    "HDR" at 350 nits? I don't think so. That doesn't even qualify as the not-really HDR 400 spec. This is NOT an HDR monitor folks.
    I agree that could look a bit dull if was a TV but while 500+ nits would be ideal you are not going to get it at $450, many even more expensive ones are only 300-400 nits. This is bang for your buck and not top of the tree for sure.
    Reply
  • 42n82rst
    "GTG" @ 4mS? I don't think so!
    Kudos should only be awarded to GTG@1mS. Otherwise, FreeSync (@144hz) is for naught.
    Reply