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Viotek SUW49DA 49-inch Monitor Review: An Ultrawide and Colorful View

Take a walk on the mega-wide side.

Viotek SUW49DA
(Image: © Viotek)

To read about our monitor tests in-depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test PC Monitors. We cover Brightness and Contrast testing on page two.

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

The SUW49DA is the second 5120 x 1440 resolution monitor we’ve reviewed, so the AOC Agon AG493UCX is included here for comparison, along with an array of 34-inch and one 35-inch ultrawides. They are the Cooler Master GM34-CW, Viotek GNV34DBE, AOC CU34G2X and ViewSonic Elite XG350R-C.

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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Ultrawide monitors don’t have to be quite as bright as their 16:9 counterparts to provide enough output. That said, the Viotek AG493UCX is an extreme overachiever. It could light up a small town when the backlight is maxed. The SUW49DA doesn’t quite hit its 400-nit spec, but at 360 nits, there is more than enough output for satisfying gameplay or any other task.

Black levels are about average for a VA panel, which results in a respectable 2,599.6:1 static contrast score. The AOC manages to eke a little more dynamic range, but any of these monitors will deliver better blacks and a deeper image than an IPS or TN display.

After Calibration to 200 nits

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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Calibration (see our recommended settings) gave us a nice gain in dynamic range (2,839:1 versus 2,600:1), thanks to changes we made to gamma and the contrast slider. We also saw an improvement in color saturation.

Our sample monitor had solid screen uniformity and a properly fitted grid polarizer, so intra-image contrast is nearly the same as the static value. That’s excellent performance, especially given the Viotek’s price, which is lower than other 32:9 screens.

  • TrackSmart
    First, thanks for the detailed review!

    A suggestion: It would be useful to reiterate in the conclusions that this monitor does not have an SRGB mode. You say in the article that this is not a big deal (and mention potential workarounds), but to some users this is indeed a deal-breaker on a wide gamut display that would be used for more than just gaming.
    Reply