Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

First Ever GeForce GTX 285 2 GB Card

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 52 comments

Palit Microsystems has unleashed its very first custom designed GeForce GTX 285, available in both 1 GB and 2 GB tasty flavors.

According to the company, its GTX 285 2 GB graphics card is the first in the industry to offer such a heavy load of memory, however consumers who don't have that kind of cash to thrash can option to buy the neglected step-child, the Palit GTX 285 1 GB version. Despite the different memory helpings, both cards offer the usual Nvidia goodness gamers have come to know and love, including Nvidia's PhysX and CUDA technologies. Both also offer core speeds of 648 MHz, and 2.5 GHz on its GDDR3 memory with a 512-bit interface, coughing up nearly 50 percent more performance than prior generation GPUs. And of course, more power means more gaming love. Who doesn't want that?

Although the card sports two PWM fans, the GTX 285 series utilizes four heat-pipes, unlike the Inno3D GeForce GTX 260 announced yesterday, sporting only three heat-pipes. "Conceived for two GPUs, the two PWM fans are able to provide sufficient air flow to cool GPU on the graphics card quietly. The PWM fan created for both fans can adjust the fan speed depending on the GPU’s temperature," the company said.

The GeForce GTX 285 supports Microsoft's DirectX 10 Shader model 4.0, GigaThread, OpenGL 2.1, as well as SL multi-monitor support. Two dual-link DVI outputs support two 2560x1600 resolution displays, and utilizes dynamic contrast enhancement and color stretch. With Nvidia's CUDA technology, editors can transcode video up to 20x faster than using traditional CPUs (which is both annoying and time consuming, especially for consumers suffering ADD). Nvidia's PureVideo technology promises "unprecedented picture clarity, smooth video, accurate color, and precise image scaling for movies and video with minimal CPU usage and low power consumption."

Under the hood (so to speak), the card features a 240 enhanced processor core clocking in at 648 MHz. The 1 GB/2 GB of GDDR3 memory clocks in at 2.5 GHz using a 512-bit interface and a memory bandwidth of 159 GB/sec. The card offers a whopping 51.8 billion/sec texture fill rate, and cranks out all the graphical goodness through a PCI Express bus interface (supporting 2.0). According to the product page, the card requires a PCI Express or PCI Express 2.0-compliant motherboard with one dual-width x 16 graphics slot. The card also needs a 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector and a 550W or greater power supply to keep it juiced.

Palit Microsystems said that the GeForce GTX 285 is (unfortunately) "built for Windows Vista," and is GeForce 3D Vision-ready as well. Mmmmmm beefy!

Discuss
Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the News comments forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

This thread is closed for comments
Top Comments
  • 13 Hide
    Tindytim , February 24, 2009 11:33 PM
    Quote:
    the GeForce GTX 285 is (unfortunately) "built for Windows Vista,"

    Please fire Kevin Parrish.
Other Comments
  • 3 Hide
    Claimintru , February 24, 2009 10:43 PM
    How is it "Built" for vista. Using one right now (Not Palit mind you) on Win XP Pro and its butter.
  • 1 Hide
    curnel_D , February 24, 2009 11:09 PM
    "Despite the different memory helpings, both cards offer the usual Nvidia goodness gamers have come to know and love, including Nvidia's PhysX and CUDA technologies."

    Wow kevin, the second article today that you spew this crap. Cuda and PhysX isnt the finest thing since sliced bread. Infact, PhysX divides your graphic card's computational cycles between PhysX and Graphics, slowing games down in most instances, while Nvidia cuts out the best PhysX option, the seperate PPU. And second, Cuda has hardly any compatable bug free programs, and they're all way way to expensive. Both things are just exuberant amounts of propaganda from Nvidia to get them to buy their overpriced GPUs.

    Or have they threatened to black list you too, best of media?
  • Display all 52 comments.
  • 4 Hide
    Darkness Flame , February 24, 2009 11:29 PM
    I don't know about that, Curnel_D. I mean, both Mirror's Edge and Unreal Tournament 3 show rather nice eye candy with PhysX enabled. Sure, it cuts your frames, but it's better than running it on a CPU, and you could always get another card. In fact, if you already have one nVidia card, you could get a second nVidia card, that doesn't have to be the same mind you, and have that one focus on just PhysX, so you don't really see a drop.

    As for CUDA, sure, it's not perfect yet. But if you use the Adobe CS4 suite, or you just transcode a lot of video, spending ~$20 more on an nVidia card for equal frames, but a significant boost in those other applications isn't that bad.
  • 13 Hide
    Tindytim , February 24, 2009 11:33 PM
    Quote:
    the GeForce GTX 285 is (unfortunately) "built for Windows Vista,"

    Please fire Kevin Parrish.
  • 0 Hide
    aevm , February 24, 2009 11:45 PM
    ClaimintruHow is it "Built" for vista. Using one right now (Not Palit mind you) on Win XP Pro and its butter.


    It's a DX10 card, and DX10 is available only in Vista. I'm guessing that's what they meant.

    Of course your card works on XP, just like my 8800GTX works on XP, but we're losing some eye candy when running in DX9.
  • 4 Hide
    ailgatrat , February 24, 2009 11:59 PM
    "According to the company, its GTX 285 2 GB graphics card is the first in the industry to offer such a heavy load of memory, however consumers who don't have that kind of cash to thrash can option to buy the neglected step-child, the Palit GTX 285 1 GB version."

    Uh...neglected step-child? Where are the numbers to show how many of either of these cards are getting bought? And what the hell is "cash to thrash", anyways?

    If your going to write about your opinions on things, then say so from the get go and don't try to make this look like a serious news article.
  • -9 Hide
    RiotSniperX , February 25, 2009 12:43 AM
    Wait, first to have 2gb?

    4870x2 has 2gb -.-
  • -9 Hide
    ravenware , February 25, 2009 12:45 AM
    nvidiot article.

    There are plenty of Radeon cards with interesting modifications too.
    (4850x2 2GB, toxic/ atomic cards)
  • 4 Hide
    Tindytim , February 25, 2009 12:51 AM
    aevmIt's a DX10 card, and DX10 is available only in Vista. I'm guessing that's what they meant.

    That's still a retarded thing to say, and not only makes multiple fallacious logical jumps, but then wraps it up with a false and misleading statement.
  • 6 Hide
    seboj , February 25, 2009 12:57 AM
    TindytimPlease fire Kevin Parrish.


    Seconded.
  • 8 Hide
    nukemaster , February 25, 2009 1:26 AM
    This is kind of funny.

    Quote:
    Palit Microsystems said that the GeForce GTX 285 is (unfortunately) "built for Windows Vista,"

    Booo-hoo. Have you ever even used Windows Vista? or are you just trying to be "Cool"?

    Quote:
    According to the product page, the card requires a PCI Express or PCI Express 2.0-compliant motherboard with one dual-width x 16 graphics slot

    Damn, I was gonna try to jam a PCI-E card into my old AGP system.

    Is it a slow news day?
  • 2 Hide
    curnel_D , February 25, 2009 2:02 AM
    Darkness FlameI don't know about that, Curnel_D. I mean, both Mirror's Edge and Unreal Tournament 3 show rather nice eye candy with PhysX enabled. Sure, it cuts your frames, but it's better than running it on a CPU, and you could always get another card. In fact, if you already have one nVidia card, you could get a second nVidia card, that doesn't have to be the same mind you, and have that one focus on just PhysX, so you don't really see a drop.As for CUDA, sure, it's not perfect yet. But if you use the Adobe CS4 suite, or you just transcode a lot of video, spending ~$20 more on an nVidia card for equal frames, but a significant boost in those other applications isn't that bad.

    Sure, PhysX has redeaming qualities, and I wont argue that it doesnt. But killing the best thing it had going for it (The seperate physics processing unit), just to add it to their current lineup of cards (Effectively reducing frame rates in any PhysX enabled games because of the load on the GPU), AND block ATI users from using physX in vista (In XP, you can use an ATI for main graphics, and an Nvidia for physX), and all of this just to increase sales on their aging gaming card lineup (At the time, btw. I know they've updated.) isnt consumer friendly at all.

    This combined with the fact that I cant stand most PhysX games :p  makes trumpeting in PhysX just stupid.

    CUDA "will" be an awesome Technology. But on the same hand, ATI is doing the same exact thing with OpenCL, which will either be just as good, if not better because of it's open nature. The funny thing is, OpenCL will run on Intel, ATI, and Nvidia hardware. So I'm guessing adoption rate will be through the roof compared to the proprietary CUDA.

    But a HUGE thing to remember is the fact that Nvidia is currently black-listing anyone who doesnt comply with their propaganda.
    http://www.overclock.net/hardware-news/465934-inq-nvidia-s-big-dishonesty.html

    And for firing Kevin Parrish, you have a third from me.
  • -1 Hide
    lonno , February 25, 2009 2:29 AM
    Tom'shas become a biased sh*tty site. This is complete garbage. Wow is all I can say. This aught to get me banned for life....
  • 0 Hide
    Tindytim , February 25, 2009 2:37 AM
    lonnoTom'shas become a biased sh*tty site. This is complete garbage. Wow is all I can say. This aught to get me banned for life....

    It won't.

    If you want a ban, post sum cp.
  • 8 Hide
    scrumhalf , February 25, 2009 3:01 AM
    RiotSniperXWait, first to have 2gb?4870x2 has 2gb -.-


    It's the first single GPU to have 2GB. Radeon 4870x2 has 2x1GB, 1 GB for each GPU (same as the 4850x2). It's not the same as having 2 GB. Each GPU on the 4870x2 still has a 1 GB limit for textures, etc. where the 2GB GTX 285 has 2 GB of memory for textures. This will especially benefit at high resolutions (2560x1600) with AA and AF enabled.
  • 6 Hide
    BaBa BoeY , February 25, 2009 4:31 AM
    What's the price tag?
  • -4 Hide
    seboj , February 25, 2009 4:40 AM
    BaBa BoeYWhat's the price tag?


    Over 9000.
  • 1 Hide
    Tindytim , February 25, 2009 4:53 AM
    BaBa BoeYWhat's the price tag?

    It is odd the make a statement about cash thrashing when no numbers have been quoted. I can't find any numbers, but I doubt the difference in price between the 1 and 2 gig version would be so large that the 2 gig version would be considered "cash thrashing" while the 1 gig version would not.
  • 5 Hide
    Animebando , February 25, 2009 4:55 AM
    I enjoy the comments. Partly because they piss so many of you off for some reason. Yay for cynics.
  • -1 Hide
    Tindytim , February 25, 2009 4:59 AM
    AnimebandoI enjoy the comments. Partly because they piss so many of you off for some reason. Yay for cynics.

    Wait, the comments piss so many people off?

    I'd say, more often then not, the articles piss people off. Although, when the article pisses people off, people usually end up making stupid comments about it that piss other people off.

    But I agree. Pissed off people are often hilarious. I'm sure you'd make a great Troll.
Display more comments