Alleged Titan Card Shows Dual 16-pin Power and Quad-Slot Cooler

Nvidia Titan RTX Ada
Nvidia Titan RTX Ada (Image credit: Moore’s Law is Dead)

The GeForce RTX 4090 is one of the best graphics cards, but it may not be the best of what the Nvidia Ada Lovelace architecture has to offer. According to the YouTube channel Moore’s Law is Dead (opens in new tab) (MLID), Nvidia has an ace up its sleeves: the Titan RTX Ada. This, of course, is just a rumor, so any information or renders should be taken with a healthy heaping of salt — several spoonfuls, at least!

It’s been a while since Nvidia launched a Titan product. The last Titan was the Titan RTX, a monster graphics card from the 2018 Turing days with a $2,499 MSRP. After that, Nvidia seemed to forsake the Titan brand with Ampere, instead offering the RTX 3090 Ti as an alternative, but it might return with Ada Lovelace — if the rumors are true. The YouTuber shared renders of a Titan RTX Ada prototype, which they claim are the product of actual photographs in their possession.

And let’s stop right there for a moment. If someone has photographs of a product, then why are they sharing renders of the product? (Yes, “We must protect our sources!”) Still, renders are far, far easier to fake, and there have already been a few meme renders of future Nvidia GPUs floating around. But if true, the future Titan looks comically huge.

The GeForce RTX 4090 is already pretty big, but the Titan RTX Ada will blow it out of the water based on these renders. The renders show a quad-slot graphics card with the same Founder’s Edition cooler aesthetic as Nvidia’s current RTX 4090 and RTX 4080 offerings. In addition, the PCB might be in a “sandwich,” with a thicker plate on the back of the graphics card to help with cooling. It’s a brilliant idea, as the Titan RTX Ada will most likely have 48GB of GDDR6X in split mode, where Nvidia places memory modules on both sides of the PCB (i.e., similar to the RTX 3090 and previous Titan cards).

The renders also show the Titan RTX Ada proudly flaunting a gold finish, which is characteristic of the previous Titan RTX graphics card. The quad-slot cooling system will probably be necessary if the rumors that claim the Ada Titan could be a 650W graphics card that can hit 700W with manual overclocking.

Nvidia utilizes the AD102 die for different Ada SKUs, including the GeForce RTX 4090 and RTX 6000 Ada. AD102, which measures 608mm², houses 144 Streaming Multiprocessors (SMs). The GeForce RTX 4090 has 128 enabled SMs, while the RTX 6000 Ada sports 142 SMs. So there seems to be enough room for a GeForce RTX 4090 Ti, a Titan RTX Ada — or even both. The GeForce RTX 4090 Ti is rumored to share the same core configuration as the RTX 6000 Ada, so only the Titan RTX Ada will (allegedly) leverage the full AD102 silicon.

A complete AD102 die would mean that the Titan RTX Ada could wield 18,432 CUDA cores, 576 Tensor cores, and 144 RT cores. Clock speeds are unknown but would likely land in the 2.5–2.7 GHz range, just like the other 40-series GPUs. It also seems like the GPU will have 48GB of GDDR6X — twice as much as the GeForce RTX 4090. Now that Micron has been mass-producing 24 Gbps GDDR6X modules, the Titan RTX Ada will have double the capacity and probably more bandwidth.

The GeForce RTX 4090 has 21 Gbps GDDR6X memory and a 384-bit interface to deliver a memory bandwidth of 1,008 GB/s. Assuming that the Titan RTX Ada rocks 24 Gbps GDDR6X modules, it would theoretically pump out 1,152 GB/s, 14% more than the GeForce RTX 4090.

The GeForce RTX 4090 is a 450W TDP graphics card that draws what it needs from a single 16-pin power connector (12VHPWR). If the leaked renders are accurate, Nvidia may provision the Titan RTX Ada with two 16-pin power connectors. However, with all the cases of the connector and Nvidia adapter melting on the GeForce RTX 4090, many would think having two of the connectors isn't a good idea.

The leaker claims Nvidia hasn't decided on a firm launch date for the Ada Titan, so don't expect to see it on the market any time soon. However, the chipmaker reportedly has the Titan prototype on standby in its labs. So maybe it's waiting for AMD to try to make a power move with the RDNA 3 before it unleashes the beast, or perhaps it's waiting for the Spring GTC (GPU Technology Conference).

Price is also unknown, but given the overpriced GeForce RTX 40-series graphics cards, we wouldn't be surprised if Nvidia slaps a $2,999 price tag on the future Titan Ada — which was also the price of the Titan V. The Titan RTX launched at $2,499, after all, and that was four years ago. Professional RTX 6000 Ada cards are currently in the $7,500–$10,000 range, so as a "prosumer" alternative, three grand wouldn't be too surprising.

Will we actually see the return of the Titan brand? We remain skeptical, as Nvidia seems to like having more expensive professional cards with a large gap between the GeForce model (RTX 4090 and previously the 3090/3090 Ti) and the equivalent professional card (RTX A6000 and now RTX 6000 Ada). But if Nvidia has taught us anything over the years, it likes to keep its options open. So with consumer cards already selling at over $2,000, why not push out an even faster model that bumps the price up 50 percent? Just don't pretend it's for gaming.

Zhiye Liu
RAM Reviewer and News Editor

Zhiye Liu is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Although he loves everything that’s hardware, he has a soft spot for CPUs, GPUs, and RAM.

  • -Fran-
    "If someone has photographs of a product, then why are they sharing renders of the product?"

    Tom (MLID) has explained this several times and it makes sense (to me at least): photographs are way easier to track back to sources than a render that faithfully represent the photos. It's way more effort to produce, but it offers an extra layer of security for whomever is providing the "deets".

    And yes, quite the chonker. You could even say it's a chonker of titanic proportions, am I right? HA.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    -Fran- said:
    "If someone has photographs of a product, then why are they sharing renders of the product?"

    Tom (MLID) has explained this several times and it makes sense (to me at least): photographs are way easier to track back to sources than a render that faithfully represent the photos. It's way more effort to produce, but it offers an extra layer of security for whomever is providing the "deets".

    And yes, quite the chonker. You could even say it's a chonker of titanic proportions, am I right? HA.

    Regards.
    The point is, MLID has been laughably wrong on many topics, so we take everything he says with a massive dose of skepticism. Remember the $249 / $199 RDNA cards that were going to be RTX killers back in 2017? Yeah, I do. Intel's Arc is DEAD! Except it's not, at least not yet (officially). I'm sure Nvidia has at least mulled over the idea of a new Titan card, just as I'm sure it thought about a Titan with the previous Ampere architecture. But that never happened, and certainly the same could occur with the Ada Titan. There will likely be either 4090 Ti or a new Titan, but probably not both. We'll see what happens...
    Reply
  • nimbulan
    JarredWaltonGPU said:
    The point is, MLID has been laughably wrong on many topics, so we take everything he says with a massive dose of skepticism. Remember the $249 / $199 RDNA cards that were going to be RTX killers back in 2017? Yeah, I do. Intel's Arc is DEAD! Except it's not, at least not yet (officially). I'm sure Nvidia has at least mulled over the idea of a new Titan card, just as I'm sure it thought about a Titan with the previous Ampere architecture. But that never happened, and certainly the same could occur with the Ada Titan. There will likely be either 4090 Ti or a new Titan, but probably not both. We'll see what happens...
    Yeah he has zero credibility as far as I'm concerned. I really have no clue why his wild rumors keep getting posted as news.

    As far as this rumor is concerned, these renders make no sense. One shows the PCB being in the normal location at the very top of the card, but the other shows the power connectors being mounted 2/3 of the way down the cooler?
    Reply
  • Metal Messiah.
    There are always too many red flags when it comes to rumors coming from MLID. Do these guys post such rumors just to get more views/clicks on YT channel ? I wouldn't be surprised if they do, lol.

    This guy has been wrong on several past rumors as well, so it's to digest this new leak, at least for me. Those renders seem fishy.
    Reply
  • atomicWAR
    And I have a bridge in Brooklen to sell you if you buy MLID's 'rumor' (cough trash cough cough)...

    While I have no doubt a higher end SKU is coming, this guys track record is in a Chernobyl gutter next to the meltdown itself. Throwing S#!+ at the wall hoping something sticks is about all MLID does. Move on nothing to see here except the faux hype-train circus. Smh
    Reply
  • -Fran-
    To each their own, I guess.

    It's just another point of information and, well, speculation. It's not like I have monetary interest in MLID, Tom's Hardware or any other news outlet getting things right, so I just enjoy the "talk" of things and MLID offers plenty of that; specially with the great guests he sometimes brings.

    Regards.
    Reply
  • rbuffetta
    We will be on this one soon. This is the old aprils fools card.

    https://i.pcmag.com/imagery/articles/03BoUhy8xMqGogBqhHxhyDC-1.fit_lim.size_1600x900.v1617286721.jpg
    Reply
  • oofdragon
    Lol
    Reply
  • gg83
    I only follow gamers nexus on YT and Toms for pc related news. Cortex is good to. He clearly states when he is speculating and will admit when he's wrong.
    Reply
  • bitbucket
    Keep your distance, if you get caught in that thing's gravity well you're done for.
    Reply