Skip to main content

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Review: Fastest Integrated Graphics Ever

Ryzen 7 5700G
(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The eight-core 16-thread Ryzen 7 5700G marks the arrival of AMD's first 7nm 'Cezanne' Zen 3 APUs for desktop PCs, and today we're taking an early look at the chips. AMD plans to use the Cezanne chips to plug big price gaps in its Ryzen 5000 lineup that dominates our Best CPU list and CPU Benchmark hierarchy, but they're limited to the OEM market until the full retail launch on August 5, 2021. Anticipation is high, though, so we grabbed an off-the-shelf system from HP to take the Ryzen 7 5700G for a spin.

Cezanne will be the first AMD APUs available at retail since the quad-core Zen+ "Picasso" models landed back in 2019. AMD actually replaced its Picasso chips with the eight-core Zen 2-powered Ryzen Pro "Renoir" series in 2020, but in a disappointing development, it reserved those chips for OEMs. Unfortunately, that means APUs with the aging Zen+ architecture are the best you can find at retail, even though AMD has already progressed through three chip generations in the interim (Zen 2, XT, Zen 3). 

AMD Ryzen 5000 G-Series 65W Cezanne APUs
CPU
Arch.PriceCores/ ThreadsBase/ Boost Freq.GPU CoresGPU Freq. (MHz)TDPL3 (MB)
Ryzen 7 5700GZen 3$3598 / 163.8 / 4.6RX Vega 8200065W16
Ryzen 5 5600GZen 3$2596 / 123.9 / 4.4RX Vega 7190065W16
Ryzen 3 5300GZen 3N/a4 / 84.0 / 4.2RX Vega 6170065W8

AMD's decision to keep those chips off the retail market couldn't have come at a worse time. The pandemic triggered an unprecedented PC upgrade cycle right as supply chain disruptions and component shortages rocked the globe and cryptomining reemerged, all conspiring to create the most severe GPU shortage in history. With discrete GPUs nowhere to be found, the Renoir chips and their serviceable integrated GPUs would have been a godsend for gamers looking to wait out the GPU shortage, but the shortage found even AMD's last-gen Picasso chips disappearing entirely from shelves.

AMD launched its Ryzen 5000 chips in the interim, but the company's pivot to premium pricing exposed two weaknesses in its product stack, including a steep $300 minimum price of entry to the Zen 3 family and a big $150 gap between its Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 families. Unfortunately for AMD, Intel's Rocket Lake blasted in a few months ago and plugged those pricing gaps, catching AMD uncharacteristically flat-footed.

The Cezanne APUs, which come with Zen 3 execution cores paired with the Radeon Vega graphics engine, look to solve several problems at once. Instead of its traditional separation of the CPU and APU lines, AMD slots the Cezanne chips right into its Ryzen 5000 stack — AMD says they fill the role of the standard "non-X" models that traditionally offer more attractive price points at a given core count by sacrificing peak clock speed for a lower TDP. That means the 5700G should essentially slot in as a Ryzen 7 5800, which doesn't make a lot of sense given that AMD actually has a Ryzen 7 5800 that is OEM-only. We'll dive into that a bit more later.

According to AMD, Cezanne is the cure for all of Ryzen 5000's pricing ills, with the $359 eight-core 16-thread Ryzen 7 5700G plugging the gulf between the Ryzen 7 and 5 lineups, while the $259 six-core Ryzen 5 5600G reduces the steep price of entry to the Zen 3 lineup. Both chips also come with a bundled Wraith Stealth cooler, sweetening the deal.

AMD is still holding back several of its lower-end APUs from the retail market, but given the ongoing graphics card shortages, the Cezanne APUs could be a welcome sight for the gaming market. That is if the GPU shortage persists into August, and if these chips actually slot in between the performance of their Ryzen counterparts. That's a tall order given that the tradeoffs associated with their monolithic die design, which differs significantly from the chiplet-based Ryzen 5000 chips. Let's see how it all works out. 

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Specifications and Pricing

The Ryzen 5000G family spans from four to eight cores and has the Zen 3 architecture that provides a 19% IPC uplift over the Zen 2 architecture used in the previous-gen Ryzen 4000G models.

AMD is only bringing the eight-core 16-thread Ryzen 7 5700G and six-core 12-thread Ryzen 5 5600G to retail, at least for now. In addition, AMD currently hasn't announced when it will bring the four-core eight-thread Ryzen 3 5300G or the 35W GE-Series models to retail, meaning we won't see any significant change to our list of Best Cheap CPUs any time soon. 

AMD Ryzen 5000 G-Series 65W Cezanne APUs
CPU
Arch.PriceCores/ ThreadsBase/ Boost Freq.TDPL3 (MB)GPU CoresGPU Freq. (MHz)
Ryzen 7 5800XZen 3$4498 / 163.8 / 4.7 GHz105W32 (1x32)N/aN/a
Core i7-11700K (KF)Rocket Lake$374 - $3498 / 163.6 / 5.0125W16UHD Graphics 750 Xe 32EU1300
Ryzen 7 5700GZen 3$3598 / 163.8 / 4.665W16RX Vega 82000
Ryzen 7 4750GZen 2~$3108 / 163.6 / 4.465W8RX Vega 82100
Ryzen 5 5600XZen 3$2996 / 123.7 / 4.6 GHz65W32 (1x32)N/aN/a
Core i5-11600K (KF)Rocket Lake$262 (K) - $237(KF)6 / 123.9 / 4.9125W12UHD Graphics 750 Xe 32EU1300
Ryzen 5 5600GZen 3$2596 / 123.9 / 4.465W16RX Vega 71900
Ryzen 5 3600Zen 2$2006 / 123.6 / 4.265W32N/AN/a
Core i5-11400 (F)Rocket Lake$182 - $1576 / 122.6 / 4.265W12UHD Graphics 750 Xe 24EU1300
Ryzen 3 5300GZen 3N/a4 / 84.0 / 4.265W8RX Vega 61700
Ryzen 5 3400GZen+$1494 / 83.7 / 4.265W4RX Vega 111400

The 65W eight-core 16-thread Ryzen 7 5700G comes with a 3.8-GHz base and a 4.6-GHz boost clock, 16MB of L3 cache, and eight Radeon RX Vega CUs that operate at 2.0 GHz. As with all Zen 3 processors, the Ryzen 5000G chips step up from DDR4-2933 to DDR4-3200 interface, which will help boost gaming performance with the integrated GPU. Compared to the eight-core Ryzen 7 5800X, you gain the Radeon graphics engine but sacrifice 100 MHz of peak boost clocks and half the L3 cache. You also step back from 24 lanes of PCIe 4.0 support to 24 lanes of PCIe 3.0. 

AMD is quite adamant that the Ryzen 5000G chips serve as the new "non-X" models for the Zen 3 family. The $359 Ryzen 7 5700G plugs the sizeable $150 gap between the $449 Ryzen 9 5800X and $299 Ryzen 5 5600X. That gap left Intel's Core i7-11700K room to operate, but AMD says the 5700G's performance slots perfectly between the other Ryzen 5000 parts and brings the advantage of the integrated Vega graphics engine.

The 65W six-core 12-thread Ryzen 5 5600G comes with a 3.9 GHz base, 4.4 GHz boost, and seven Radeon Vega CUs that operate at 1.9 GHz. We're working to source this chip, too, so keep your eyes peeled for that review. 

The $256 5600G plugs the gap between the $299 Ryzen 5 5600X and, well, AMD's entire sub-$299 product stack. AMD's aging Ryzen 5 3600 is the only real relevant contender in this price range, and it isn't competitive with Intel's Rocket Lake Core i5-11600K or Core i5-11400, leaving Intel to reign uncontested in the budget market (as you can see in our recent 11400 vs 3600 faceoff).

Based on suggested pricing, the 5600G grapples with the Core i5-11600K, but AMD has yet to address the current value budget champ, the Intel Core i5-11400.

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Cezanne Architecture

We're jumping the gun on AMD's official Cezanne launch, so we don't have as much deep-dive information as usual. However, AMD uses the same SoC for the Ryzen 5000 mobile chips and the Ryzen 5000G desktop PC APUs, so we have the most important info. We're sure AMD will share additional information around the formal launch, and we'll update then.

Surprisingly, the majority of the Ryzen 5000G 'Cezanne' SoC comes from the Ryzen 4000 'Renoir' SoC. To improve time to market, AMD essentially swapped in new Zen 3 cores, leaving the I/O, 7nm Radeon RX Vega integrated graphics engine and SoC design intact.

Naturally, the chip has much more thermal and power headroom in a desktop PC, so AMD tunes multiple variables to tailor the chips for both unique segments, like power consumption, boosting algorithms, and power-sharing between the CPU and GPU. You can read much more about the design and architecture in our AMD Ryzen 5000 Mobile 'Cezanne' SoC Deep Dive.

AMD reused the Renoir SoC design, so the 5700G comes with the 7nm Radeon RX Vega graphics engine with eight CUs, and not a newer RDNA-based design. AMD has dialed back the 5700G's iGPU by 100 MHz compared to the previous-gen 4750G but increased the CPU base/boost clock rates by 200 MHz, suggesting that it tuned the SoC for an optimal balance of CPU and GPU horsepower. AMD had already reworked the graphics architecture for its last go-round with Renoir — the reworked 7nm RX Vega graphics delivered up to 60% percent more performance per compute unit (CU) than its predecessors, equating to more graphics performance from fewer CU.

Ryzen 5000G’s monolithic die allows for tighter control of power efficiency and other important characteristics for the mobile space, but it also introduces a few tradeoffs compared to the desktop chips that have a chiplet-based design. For example, unifying all the I/O, cache, and CPU cores, not to mention adding GPU cores, onto a single die inevitability resulted in some sacrifices to meet the company's performance, power, and area (PPA) targets.

For instance, the Ryzen 7 5700G has 16MB of L3 cache, but that's half the L3 capacity of the chiplet-based Ryzen 7 5800X for desktop PCs that also comes with eight cores. However, Cezanne does improve over the Renoir APUs — the 5700G has twice the L3 of the eight-core 4750G. 

AMD

(Image credit: AMD)

AMD also unified the eight cores and cache into one contiguous 16MB cluster inside the CCX (Core Complex). In contrast, Zen 2 had two four-core clusters, each with 4MB of cache. This larger unified cache improves both core-to-cache and core-to-core latency over the Renoir chips. In addition, for highly-threaded applications, this imparts a 2X cache increase, and lightly-threaded workloads now have access to a full 16MB of cache, equivalent to a 4X increase in directly-accessible cache.

Re-using the Renoir SoC design also means that AMD has stuck with the PCIe 3.0 interface found on all its current-gen APUs. As such, the chip has 24 lanes of PCIe 3.0 connectivity compared to 24 lanes of PCIe 4.0 found on the Ryzen 5000 models for the desktop PC.

The Cezanne desktop chips will find their way into 500-series and some 400-series motherboards, though support on the latter will vary by vendor. 

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Test Setup, Overclocking, and Thermals

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

Gigabyte RTX 3090 for scale (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

AMD's Ryzen 7 5700G is available through OEMs, so we bought an HP Pavilion TP01-2066 system so we could strip the chip and get to testing, but the system configuration sent us down another rabbit hole. The TP01 is an office machine, and the motherboard's two DIMM slots and heatsink-less five-phase power delivery subsystem tells us it isn't designed with gaming performance in mind. That doesn't excuse the memory configuration, though. 

We purchased this system for $700 through the Office Depot website, but it's only available with 16GB of memory. The system shipped with a single 16GB Kingston memory DIMM, and Office Depot doesn't give you an option to order the system with two 8GB DIMMs, or even two 16GB DIMMs.

For those not in the know, populating a single channel of a dual-channel memory controller halves the potential memory bandwidth, and that's particularly brutal for APUs because the integrated graphics engine is heavily reliant upon system memory.

Yes, we know that it's a common practice for some OEM systems to ship with only a single DIMM. But no, retailers shouldn't ship APU-powered systems without populating the available memory channels (or at least offer an option to do so).

To highlight the performance impact, we tested in both a single-DIMM and dual-DIMM configuration in the HP system. Integrated graphics performance typically isn't as impacted by latency as much as just sheer bandwidth, but adding slight insult to an already grievous injury, the single DIMM matches the 5700G's stock DDR4-3200 interface but uses unalterable JEDEC timings of 22-22-22-52. Again, this is common with OEM systems, but disappointing.

As we'll show in great detail below, the single-DIMM config destroys gaming performance. Most enthusiasts will seek out this chip for the integrated graphics engine, so we tested the integrated graphics in both single- and dual-DIMM configurations in the OEM system. For comparison, we also dropped the chip into a proper motherboard, the ASUS ROG Strix B550-E, for iGPU testing on an enthusiast-class board.

AMD says the Ryzen 7 5700G slots in as what we would traditionally think of as a non-X CPU. Additionally, some enthusiasts will seek out the chip to game with the iGPU until they can find a discrete GPU after the shortage recedes. As such, we also paired the chip with the Gigabyte GeForce RTX 3090 Eagle we use for our standard gaming suite. We didn't bother testing the OEM system in our standard discrete GPU gaming test suite, but as shown in the picture above, the 3090 won't fit into the HP system anyway.

We also ran our standard application suite with both the OEM and enthusiast motherboards, so we have plenty of test results to chew over.

While AMD has official graphics drivers in the wild, be aware that support for the 5700G series is still very basic on enthusiast motherboards. The ASRock X570 and an ASUS ROG Strix B550-E both ran the chip with no issues, but overclocking functionality is still very basic. We expect that motherboard makers will engage in the normal round of firmware tuning prior to the official launch in August, but we didn't have much luck with overclocking our chip. We'll add overclocking to our results when we revisit the chip at its official launch. 

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Gaming Benchmarks 

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Integrated GPU Gaming Performance — The TLDR 

Below you can see the geometric mean of our integrated graphics gaming tests across five titles at 1280x720 and 1080p, with each resolution split into its own chart to give us a decent overall view of the current landscape. These are cumulative metrics, so individual wins vary on a per-title basis. You'll find the game-by-game test results further below. 

Here are the Ryzen 7 5700G configurations for the entries in the charts below:

  • Ryzen 7 5700G B550: 2x 8GB DDR4-3200 (dual channel) memory @ 16-16-16-36, ASUS ROG Strix B550-E, PBO disabled, Default power limits
  • Ryzen 7 5700G HP Dual Channel: 2x 16GB DDR4-3200 (dual channel) memory @ 22-22-22-52, HP Pavilion TP01-2066, No configurable options
  • Ryzen 7 5700G HP Single Channel: 1x 16GB DDR4-3200 (single channel) memory @ 22-22-22-52, HP Pavilion TP01-2066, No configurable options
Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Our 1280x720 and 1080p cumulative results speak volumes about HP's decision to ship Ryzen 7 5700G-powered systems with a single stick of memory — the single-channel configuration delivers a devastating blow to performance. The dual-channel HP configuration is 74% faster at 1280x720 than the single-channel configuration, and 82% faster at 1080p. Bear in mind that the single-channel configuration is the only option available through Office Max, so plenty of uninformed customers are buying what are best described as crippled systems. Luckily we located a matching DIMM to test a dual-channel config with the same memory that's spec'd for the system. 

We dropped the chip into the ASUS ROG Strix B550-E to see the difference between the HP system and an enthusiast rig (marked as B550-E in the charts), but the differences were surprisingly small. The B550-E system was only 4% faster at 1280x720 and 1080p, albeit against what we would consider a properly-kitted HP system with dual memory DIMMs. So naturally, the B550-E board will be a much better solution for any type of overclocking or even basic tuning (the HP system doesn't allow you to manipulate literally any setting), not to mention the far superior connectivity options and other enthusiast trimmings, like RGB bling.

iGPU Performance relative to Ryzen 7 5700G
1280x7201920x1080
Ryzen 7 5700G B550-E 100%100%
Ryzen 7 4750G92.9%94.1%
Ryzen 5 3400G83.5%84.1%
Intel UHD Graphics 750 32 EU (11600K, 11700K)58.3%~48.9%
Intel UHD Graphics 630 24 EU (10600K)36.0%34.4%

The table above gives us a succinct iGPU performance comparison of the four most relevant chips, with the Ryzen 7 5700G on the Strix motherboard used as the baseline. We see a pretty impressive ~10% performance improvement from the 3400G to the 4750G, but bear in mind we're looking at the jump from a quad-core to an eight-core chip. The move from Renoir (4750G) to Cezzane isn't quite as impressive at ~7%, but that's still a solid gain given that we're looking at what appears to be fundamentally the same Radeon RX Vega engine paired with eight CPU cores. 

The Intel chips give us about what we expect, which is roughly the same (or slightly less) performance than the crippled Ryzen 7 5700G with a single memory stick. Intel's UHD Graphics 750 engine with the Xe architecture marked a decent step forward over the company's UHD Graphics 630 engine, but Intel's decision to port the Xe architecture back to the 14nm process resulted in fewer graphics cores — the highest-end desktop chips currently have 32 EUs, whereas the 10nm Tiger Lake chips stretch up to 96 EU.

As such, the Core i7-11700K and Core i5-11600K pull up far short of what we would expect from a graphics engine that's intended for meaningful gaming, showing they're better suited for basic display functionality. The Intel chips struggle at both 1280x720 and 1080p, netting roughly half the performance of a properly configured Ryzen 7 5700G system.

Intel has made strides here, sure, just look at the improvement over the UHD Graphics 630 engine in the 10600K. But it still lags AMD's three-year-old Ryzen 5 3400G 'Picasso' chips. Alder Lake can't come soon enough, but it remains to be seen if any of the desktop models will come with enough EUs to put up a decent fight against AMD's potent APUs. 

Overall, the results are clear; if you're looking for the best integrated graphics on the desktop, Cezanne is really the only game in town. As long as you adjust your expectations and fidelity/resolution settings accordingly, Cezanne is plenty serviceable for its target audience. We found 1280x720 gaming to be solid across numerous titles. While the number of titles you can play becomes extremely restricted at 1080p, you can get away with 1080p gaming with reduced fidelity settings in many titles, too. 

Dota 2 on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

We tested the eSports darling Dota 2 with a medium preset at both 1080p and 720p resolutions. The Ryzen 7 5700G ticked right along at 113 fps at the 1080p resolution, a nice 9% gain over the previous-gen 4750G.

However, to keep things in perspective, we have to remember that the Ryzen 5 3400G is supposed to be the only AMD APU currently available at retail (it's normally out of stock). The 5700G is 30% faster at 1080p than the 3400G, signifying a big upgrade. 

In terms of alternatives to the 5700G that you can actually buy, you're looking at the Core i7-11700K and Core i5-11600K. These chips are both surprisingly capable in this title (we'll see plenty of cases below where they aren't), but the Ryzen 7 5700G is still ~52% faster at 1080p than the UHD Graphics 750 engine. 

Far Cry 5 on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 5 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 6 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Intel processors absolutely bombed in our Far Cry 5 tests, and try as we might, we couldn't correct the issue. Flipping to the last slides in the above album shows the problem in stunning clarity — with the exception of the crippled HP config with a single DIMM, the Ryzen 7 5700G setups deliver a nice smooth and predictable series of frame rate measurements. In contrast, the Core i5-11600K and i7-11700K are incredibly inconsistent, manifesting as stuttering, hitching, and generally unplayable performance. The game is completely unplayable on the 10600K with its previous-gen UHD Graphics 630, but as you can see in the final two slides, at least it is consistently terrible. That means this issue is confined to Intel's UHD Graphics 750 engine.

Unfortunately, we've encountered this situation with a few titles that we've tested with Intel's new Xe architecture on the Rocket Lake chips, but driver updates have ironed out some of the wrinkles. We think these are early teething problems with drivers and game code, but some of these problems appear to persist, and it's been three months since the Rocket Lake launch.

We didn't encounter any of these issues with Intel's previous-gen UHD Graphics 630 engine or the Ryzen chips, and even the crippled HP single-channel setup beats the Intel chips. 

On the bright side (at least for AMD), the Ryzen 7 5700G in a reasonable configuration is quite adept at 1280x720, though things did get a bit dicier at 1080p. Of course, you always have the option to lower your quality settings, and overclocking should help. We'll dive into this title a bit deeper for the official launch. 

Grand Theft Auto V on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Grand Theft Auto V is immortal, partly because you can play it on lower-powered hardware if you're willing to trade off fidelity for performance.

Dialing back quality to the lowest settings yields a more-than-playable 88.5 fps at 1080p for the Ryzen 7 5700G, at least with the proper setup. That means there's plenty of headroom for higher quality settings, and that applies nearly doubly at the 1280x720 resolution; 140 fps leaves plenty of room for tweaking the fidelity settings.

Here we can see that the Ryzen 7 5700G in a proper dual-channel configuration provides twice the performance of the crippled 5700G configuration — that's unacceptable. Pay attention to the memory loadout if you purchase an OEM system. 

Shadow of the Tomb Raider on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Intel chips encounter more problems in the Shadow of the Tomb Raider benchmark. The Core i7-11700K and i5-11600K offer nearly identical performance in most of our benchmarks, indicating a graphics bottleneck that the 11700K's slightly higher CPU clock rate can't improve. Here we can see the Rocket Lake chips fail to reach the 30 fps threshold at 1280x720, and performance plummets to ~16 fps at 1080p. In other words, you can't do any meaningful 1080p gaming with these chips in this title without resorting to extreme tactics to reduce quality. 

The Ryzen 7 5700G churns out a respectable 62 fps at 1280x720 and 37.6 fps at 1080p. That's 19% faster at 1080p and 16% faster at 1280x720 than the Ryzen 5 3400G. The deltas shrink to 7% and 4% faster, respectively, than the Ryzen 7 4750G, but that's largely inconsequential: The 4750G is OEM-only, so if you don't plan on buying a full system, you can only buy it at scalper pricing via outlets like eBay. As shown in our Ryzen 7 4750G review, that kills the value proposition. 

Strange Brigade on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Our last foray into testing the UHD Graphics 750 engine in Strange Brigade happened at the Rocket Lake launch, and try as we might, we couldn't get the cursor to appear on the screen. However, newer drivers (or perhaps a game update?) have ironed out that issue.

Strange Brigade now works just fine on our test system, but the 5700G is roughly 70% faster at both resolutions, capping the Ryzen 5000G's commanding performance through the entire breadth of our integrated graphics test suite.  

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Discrete GPU Gaming Performance — The TLDR 

Below you can see the geometric mean of our gaming tests at 1080p and 1440p, with each resolution split into its own chart to give us a decent overall view of the current landscape. As per usual, we're testing with an Nvidia GeForce RTX 3090 to reduce GPU-imposed bottlenecks as much as possible, and differences between test subjects will shrink with lesser cards or higher resolutions. These are cumulative metrics, so individual wins vary on a per-title basis.

You'll find the game-by-game test results further below. Some of these same benchmarks appeared in our integrated GPU testing above, but we used higher quality settings for the tests below. We didn't test with the HP system here, so the test configurations are self-explanatory. 

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

AMD positions the Ryzen 5000G chips as the "non-X" equivalents for the Ryzen 5000 family. That means the 5700G should essentially slot in as a Ryzen 7 5800, which doesn't make much sense given that AMD actually has a Ryzen 7 5800 that is OEM-only.

AMD's positioning means that some enthusiasts will grab the 5700G as the non-X equivalent to the 5800X that requires a discrete GPU. Additionally, if the GPU shortage continues, it might be a good idea to use the 5700G's iGPU as a stopgap before you and upgrade to a discrete GPU later. 

Discrete GPU Performance Relative to Ryzen 7 5800X - All chips at stock settings.
1920x10802560x1440
Ryzen 7 5800X / 5600X100%100%
Core i7-11700K95.2%98%
Core i5-11600K92.8%96.7%
Ryzen 7 5700G84.3%88.9%
Ryzen 7 4750G64.5%71.2%
Ryzen 5 3400G50.6%56.9%

Here we can see how the chips stack up using the Ryzen 7 5800X and Ryzen 5 5600X (they're nearly identical in gaming) as the baseline.

One of the primary reasons to buy a reduced-TDP 'non-X' AMD chip has always been that overclocking will typically bring the non-X chip within range of the more expensive X model. That's exactly why the now-legendary Ryzen 5 3600 is so popular.

We haven't tested overclocking with the 5700G yet because the motherboard firmware still appears raw, but it's hard to see the Ryzen 7 5700G gaining 10 to 15% more dGPU gaming performance via overclocking. So it's safe to say an overclocked 5700G won't match the stock Ryzen 7 5800X, and it definitely won't reach comparable levels after overclocking. As such, you should keep your expectations in check if you're purchasing this chip as a cheaper non-X alternative.  

The 5700G lags the stock Intel processors by significant deltas, too, though it's conceivable that you could reduce these deltas to tenable levels by overclocking the 5700G. That said, we're comparing stock performance in this table, but as the charts above show, the Intel chips respond very well to overclocking. Unfortunately, we don't see the Ryzen 5700G matching the overclocked Intel comparables on a like-for-like basis.

Our cursory examination doesn't point to the Ryzen 7 5700G being the best value for gaming with a discrete GPU. Still, given the oddness of the market due to the ongoing shortages, it might fulfill a role as a stop-gap chip for some users. To give better purchasing advice, we'll have to reassess the volatile discrete GPU market when the 5700G comes to market. We'll skip the blow-by-blow analysis in the individual game results below because the results are fairly redundant and we don't have overclocking tests yet. We'll circle back to that at the official launch.

3D Mark, VRMark, Stockfish Chess Engine on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Borderlands 3 on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Far Cry 5 on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Hitman 2 on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 2

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 2

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Project CARS 3 on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Red Dead Redemption 2 on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Shadow of the Tomb Raider on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Application Benchmarks, the TLDR:

Image 1 of 2

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 2

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The charts above provide the geometric mean of several of our application tests (listed in the chart title), representing broader trends in lightly- and multi-threaded applications. Be sure to check our application tests below for performance in specific types of applications. To maintain consistency within our test pool, we conducted all of the tests below with a discrete graphics card handling the display output.

The quick takeaway is that the Ryzen 7 5700G marks a huge step forward over the Ryzen 5 3400G, which is expected from moving from four Zen+ cores to eight Zen 3 cores. The deltas in the table below speak for themselves. The 5700G also provides quite the step forward in threaded work over the Zen 2-equipped Ryzen 7 4750G, an OEM-only model.

Application Performance Relative to Core i7-11700K
Single-ThreadedMulti-Threaded
Core i7-11700K 8C/16T100%100%
Ryzen 7 5800X 8C/16T98.5%97.8%
Ryzen 7 5700G 8C/16T94.3%86.8%
Ryzen 5 5600X 6C/12T94.6%76.4%
Core i5-11600K 6C/12T98.2%78.3%
Ryzen 7 4750G 8C/16T81.9%76.1%
Ryzen 5 3400G 4C/8T68.8%33.0%

Here we examine performance compared to the Core i7-11700K as the baseline. The eight-core $359 5700G matches the $300 six-core 5600X in single-threaded work and beats it in multi-threaded work, but still lags the $450 Ryzen 7 5800X in both tests despite having the same core counts and Zen 3 microarchitecture. These performance deltas are expected, though, due to the differences between the multi-die and monolithic designs, including different cache allocations and thermal characteristics.

The $359 Ryzen 7 5700G is slower than both Intel comparables in single-threaded tasks, but it does a nice job of slotting between the $399 Core i7-11700K and $262 Core i5-11600K's performance in threaded work. The 11700K is 15% faster for about 12% more cash, but you'll also have to factor the 5700G's bundled heatsink into the equation.

Rendering Benchmarks on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 5 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 6 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 7 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 8 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 9 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 10 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 11 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 12 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 13 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 14 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 15 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 16 of 16

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Remember, the Ryzen 5 3400G is the only APU available at retail. The chip trails its more modern counterparts by massive margins in almost all of these threaded workloads, underlining that the 5700G is a massive step forward in terms of AMD's widely available silicon. You could go the extra mile and score a 4750G-powered OEM system, but stepping up to the 5700G's Zen 3 CPU cores makes much more sense for these types of applications. 

Things aren't as rosy when we compared the 5700G to the Rocket Lake chips, though. The Core i7-11700K delivers quite a bit more performance in these threaded workloads, but it does come with a higher price tag. 

Encoding Benchmarks on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 7

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 7

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 7

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 7

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 5 of 7

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 6 of 7

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 7 of 7

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Our encoding tests include benchmarks that respond best to single-threaded performance, like the quintessential LAME and FLAC examples, but the SVT-AV1 and SVT-HEVC tests represent a newer class of threaded encoders. 

Again, we see massive generational leaps for AMD's APU tech, and the 5700G more than holds its own in our LAME and Flac tests. The 5700G beats the stock Rocket Lake chips in the extended tests that cause the 11700K and 11600K to drop out of their turbo window and operate at base frequencies. 

We test HandBrake in both AVX-light x264 and AVX-heavy x265 flavors. Relative to the Rocket Lake chips, the 5700G again carves out a reasonable position on the chart given its price point. 

Office and Productivity on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 5 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 6 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 7 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 8 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 9 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Yet another Chrome update has broken out automated web browser benchmarks, and we're working to address that issue. That leaves us with PC Mark 10's built-in Edge test to quantify performance, but be aware that this test responds more to threading than any other type of web browser benchmark. 

Again, the 5700G takes strong steps forward in key areas that measure responsiveness, like the Application Start-Up benchmark. It also improves AMD's APU positioning quite drastically in the Microsoft Office benchmark suite. 

Compilation, Compression, AVX Performance on AMD Ryzen 7 5700G

Image 1 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 5 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 6 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 7 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 8 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 9 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 10 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 11 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 12 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 13 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 14 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 15 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 16 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 17 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 18 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 19 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 20 of 20

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Ryzen 7 5700G improves both compression and decompression performance drastically over the prior-gen APU models, with the latter even beating out the overclocked intel Rocket Lake chips. 

Frankly, most of these tests aren't terribly relevant to the target audience for this class of chip, they're more important for higher-end chips, and we include them for completeness. Nevertheless, the timed LLVM compilation workload, y-cruncher, and NAMD tests do a wonderful job of illustrating the architectural advances AMD has made as it progressed through the Zen+ 3400G and Zen 2 4750G to the Zen 3 APU era with the Ryzen 7 5700G.  

AMD Ryzen 7 5700G Power Consumption and Efficiency 

Image 1 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 5 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 6 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 7 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 8 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 9 of 9

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

It's no secret that Intel has dialed up the power with Rocket Lake to compete with AMD's vastly more efficient chips. As such, there are no real surprises here — the Intel chips draw more power in every measurement.

AMD's Zen 3 models are the most power-efficient desktop PC chips we've ever tested, and the Ryzen 7 5700G brings that same level of efficiency to the APU lineup. The y-cruncher multi-threaded benchmark hammers the chip with a threaded AVX-heavy workload. The eight-core 5700G draws five fewer watts than its eight-core predecessor, the 4750G, and only three more watts than the quad-core 3400G. That's impressive given the massive performance improvements we logged in this benchmark during our application testing.

The 5700G drew more power during our HandBrake x265 and Blender workloads than the previous-gen 4750G. Still, as shown in the renders-per-day-per-watt chart above and the efficiency charts below, the chip delivers significantly more performance per watt. That's a win in any book. 

Image 1 of 3

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 3

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 3

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Here we take a slightly different look at power consumption by calculating the cumulative amount of energy required to perform Blender and x265 HandBrake workloads, respectively. We plot this 'task energy' value in Kilojoules on the left side of the chart. 

These workloads are comprised of a fixed amount of work, so we can plot the task energy against the time required to finish the job (bottom axis), thus generating a really useful power chart. 

Bear in mind that faster compute times, and lower task energy requirements, are ideal. That means processors that fall the closest to the bottom left corner of the chart are best. 

Conclusion

AMD's Ryzen 7 5700G brings the vaunted Zen 3 architecture and big CPU performance gains to its APU lineup, and the integrated Radeon RX Vega graphics engine provides smooth 1080p gaming if you're willing to accept lower fidelity settings and a limited selection of titles. The chips also deliver unbeatable iGPU performance for 1280x720 gaming.

We jumped the gun and put the Ryzen 7 5700G through our test suite before AMD's official launch in August. Given the fluid state of the chip market right now, it's hard to give solid buying advice in advance — CPU and GPU pricing and availability is extremely volatile. Additionally, recent signs point to GPU supply and pricing slowly improving.

The charts below outline three areas of performance: The geometric mean of our suite of integrated graphics tests at both 1920x1080 (FHD) and 1280x720 resolutions, the geometric mean of performance with a discrete GPU, and performance in single- and multi-threaded workloads. 

Image 1 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 5 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 6 of 6

Ryzen 7 5700G

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

If you're looking to find the fastest integrated graphics performance on the market, the Ryzen 7 5700G is the uncontested champ. As long as you adjust your expectations and fidelity/resolution settings accordingly, the Cezanne chip is plenty serviceable for its target audience. We found 1280x720 gaming to be solid across numerous titles, and while the number of titles you can play comfortably becomes restricted at 1080p, you can get away with 1080p gaming with reduced fidelity settings in many titles, too.

The Ryzen 7 5700G also provides solid performance with a discrete GPU, but despite AMD's positioning of the 5700G as a filler for the non-X models that it traditionally sprinkled throughout its product stack, it isn't the best value if you're looking to use it solely with a dedicated card. As such, it's hard to say the 5700G lives up to the non-X billing. You'll be far better served with a Ryzen 5 5600X or Core i5-11400 if you're looking to build a system specifically for dGPU gaming. Given the current environment, though, the main attraction for the 5700G will be as a stop-gap solution for enthusiasts as they wait out the GPU shortage.

If your focus is strictly on the productivity side of matters, the $359 Ryzen 7 5700G's performance in threaded applications slots in between the $399 Core i7-11700K and $262 Core i5-11600K. The 11700K is 15% faster in threaded applications and 6% faster in single-threaded work for about 12% more cash. You'll also have to factor the 5700G's bundled Wraith Stealth heatsink into the equation (the 11700K doesn't ship with a cooler). Conversely, the Core i5-11600K has similar performance in single-threaded work and is 10% slower in threaded work for 27% less cash. That means, if you aren't after the 5700G's integrated graphics, there are more attractive Intel chips on either side of the pricing spectrum.

If you choose the 5700G over a 'standard' Ryzen 5000 chip, you'll sacrifice half the L3 cache, 100 MHz of peak boost clock speed, and the PCIe 4.0 interface. While PCIe 4.0 doesn't deliver any gains in gaming performance, that could change in the future with the Windows 11 Direct Storage feature that will utilize NVMe SSDs more fully. You'll also lose out on the (up to) doubled storage throughput for day-to-day file transfers and productivity applications.

Overall, if you already have a discrete GPU for your build, we think most enthusiasts will be better served with other alternatives, be they from the Ryzen 5000 product stack or Intel's lineup. Pricing is fluid, though, so be sure to check our list of Best CPUs for the latest advice.  

That leaves the Ryzen 7 5700G as an attractive chip for the normal APU target audience - it will be the hands-down champ for extreme budget gaming, small form factor, and HTPC rigs. This chip could also slot in as a much-needed temporary solution for enthusiasts that can't find a graphics card at reasonable pricing, but we'll have to temper our expectations. AMD has had considerable difficulty assuring a supply of its standard chips that generate higher margins, so it remains to be seen if we'll see many of these Cezanne chips in stock. Here's hoping they don't end up to be ghosts like we've seen with the Ryzen 3 3300X.

MORE: Best CPUs

MORE: CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy

MORE: All CPUs Content

Core i9-11900K and Core i5-11600K Test System Configurations
AMD Socket AM4 (B550, OEM)Ryzen 7 5700G
ASUS ROG Strix B550-E, HP Pavilion TP01-2066
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600 @ 3200, Kingston DDR4-3200
Intel Socket 1200 (Z590)Core i5-11600K, Core i7-11700K
ASUS Maximus XIII Hero
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600 - 10th-Gen: Stock: DDR4-2933, OC: DDR4-4000, 11th-Gen varies, outlined above (Gear 1)
AMD Socket AM4 (X570)AMD Ryzen 7 5800X, Ryzen 5 5600X

MSI MEG X570 Godlike
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600 - Stock: DDR4-3200, OC: DDR4-4000, DDR4-3600
All SystemsGigabyte GeForce RTX 3090 Eagle - Gaming and ProViz applications
Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Ti FE - Application tests

2TB Intel DC4510 SSD

EVGA Supernova 1600 T2, 1600W
Open Benchtable

Windows 10 Pro version 2004 (build 19041.450)
CoolingCorsair H115i, Custom loop
Paul Alcorn

Paul Alcorn is the Deputy Managing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He writes news and reviews on CPUs, storage and enterprise hardware.

  • thisisaname
    It may be the fastest iGPU but what I want to know is how does it compare to discrete GPUs?

    For example I want to build a new PC and I have a Nvidia 970. iI this is slower than that I would be better off getting a normal CPU and using my old card rather than getting this CPU. This article while full of information does not tell me, all it tells me it is the fastest iGPU.

    If you have a GPU you can use and it is not to old with the limits placed on this CPU I do not think it is worth getting over other CPUs, you are just limiting what you can do later on.
    Reply
  • Diabl0
    thisisaname said:
    It may be the fastest iGPU but what I want to know is how does it compare to discrete GPUs?

    For example I want to build a new PC and I have a Nvidia 970. iI this is slower than that I would be better off getting a normal CPU and using my old card rather than getting this CPU. This article while full of information does not tell me, all it tells me it is the fastest iGPU.

    If you have a GPU you can use and it is not to old with the limits placed on this CPU I do not think it is worth getting over other CPUs, you are just limiting what you can do later on.
    Exactly. The most important part is missing. Why compare this to RTX 3090? Compare it to GT 1030, GTX 1050, GTX 1650. I want to know how fast this iGPU really is.
    Reply
  • AlB80
    Not only frequencies, timings and memory channels matter, but memory ranks have a significant impact on performance in the case of multithreading and iGPU use.
    Ceteris paribus dual ranked modules always outperform single ranked.
    Reply
  • ottonis
    According to these tests, the iGPU performance is about 7-8% faster compared with its 4xxx predecessor, while RAM speed has undergone an increase from 2900 MHz to 3200 MHz.

    Assuming that RAM speed may be the single most relevant factor influencing the iGPU performance, I wonder if there's a possibility to use higher clockspeed rates RAM sticks, e.g. 3600 and overclock just the RAM speed. Shouldn't this improve IGPU perf even further?
    Reply
  • Makaveli
    I remember reading these APU's can hit high FLCK so would be curious to see a follow up with DDR4 memory in the 4000+ range.
    Reply
  • Kamen Rider Blade
    ottonis said:
    Assuming that RAM speed may be the single most relevant factor influencing the iGPU performance, I wonder if there's a possibility to use higher clockspeed rates RAM sticks, e.g. 3600 and overclock just the RAM speed. Shouldn't this improve IGPU perf even further?

    Makaveli said:
    I remember reading these APU's can hit high FLCK so would be curious to see a follow up with DDR4 memory in the 4000+ range.

    I would still probably stop at FCLK of 3800 MT/s and go for the lowest stable timings after that.

    There's not really much reason to go past 3800 due to 1 vs 2 CLK Infinity Fabric Memoryc Controller to RAM timing penalties.
    Reply
  • TCA_ChinChin
    thisisaname said:
    It may be the fastest iGPU but what I want to know is how does it compare to discrete GPUs?

    For example I want to build a new PC and I have a Nvidia 970. iI this is slower than that I would be better off getting a normal CPU and using my old card rather than getting this CPU. This article while full of information does not tell me, all it tells me it is the fastest iGPU.

    If you have a GPU you can use and it is not to old with the limits placed on this CPU I do not think it is worth getting over other CPUs, you are just limiting what you can do later on.
    I think Gamer's Nexus and Hardware Unboxed have some videos on how they do compared to low end discrete GPUs like the GT-1030. I performs slower on average but in certain games can actually match a GT-1030 which is pretty impressive imo. It's still well behind GPUs like the GTX-970 or R9-390 though.
    Reply
  • Loadedaxe
    While it is the fastest igpu, its still slower than a decent $200 chip (i5-10600k) and GT1030 in gaming, productivity, thats a different story. the GT1030 which can be had for $130 and a i5-10600k ($214) is a better option for gaming. Cost for the 5700G is just a little to steep for a gamer to use the igpu.
    Reply
  • escksu
    thisisaname said:
    It may be the fastest iGPU but what I want to know is how does it compare to discrete GPUs?

    For example I want to build a new PC and I have a Nvidia 970. iI this is slower than that I would be better off getting a normal CPU and using my old card rather than getting this CPU. This article while full of information does not tell me, all it tells me it is the fastest iGPU.

    If you have a GPU you can use and it is not to old with the limits placed on this CPU I do not think it is worth getting over other CPUs, you are just limiting what you can do later on.

    The igpu is well ... Still slow...1080p show results slightly below 40fps.

    So, dont expect too much from it.

    https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/nvidia-geforce-gt-1030-2gb,5110-5.html
    Review of the gt1030.... Looks like its pretty much on par or maybe just a tiny bit faster.
    Reply
  • usiname
    Loadedaxe said:
    While it is the fastest igpu, its still slower than a decent $200 chip (i5-10600k) and GT1030 in gaming, productivity, thats a different story. the GT1030 which can be had for $130 and a i5-10600k ($214) is a better option for gaming. Cost for the 5700G is just a little to steep for a gamer to use the igpu.
    gt 1030 is slower than vega 8, also you get 6 old skylake cores vs 8 zen 3 cores? How you get better productivity with cinebench for example - 3629 for 10600k vs 5465 for 5700g? When the intel's fanboys speak the facts are silent
    Reply