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Why It Matters That Microsoft Rebranded 'Windows Holographic' To 'Windows Mixed Reality'

Nomenclature is important. Microsoft has been using the term “Windows Holographic” to describe its mixed reality efforts--which for a time functionally consisted only of the HoloLens and the Holographic shell. Now as the company, along with Intel, pushes in new directions in the XR market, it’s rebranding “Windows Holographic” to “Windows Mixed Reality.”

A Microsoft spokesperson gave Tom’s Hardware a statement that read in full:

Microsoft renamed “Windows Holographic” to “Windows Mixed Reality” to be more encompassing of the company’s broader vision for the platform. We’re unifying the mixed reality ecosystem around a platform that enables shared experiences and interoperability between headsets. By opening up the Windows Mixed Reality platform to the industry at large, we anticipate the growth of holographic apps will make for stronger experiences and better devices for everyone.

One could read into that as much as one likes, but our take is that the new term indeed better matches what Microsoft is trying to do, particularly as it hopes to get more hardware markers into the XR fold.

Microsoft’s Three XR Pillars

Microsoft has three plays in XR. Three pillars, you might call them. One is hardware, vis-a-vis its own HoloLens--a unique device with proprietary components and see-through lenses. You can debate about whether it’s AR or MR, but it most certainly is not VR.

The second pillar involves Microsoft’s efforts with Intel to define hardware specifications for the mainstream HMDs that PC makers are building, as well as the mainstream-level PC specifications needed to run those XR experiences.

The third pillar has to do with operating systems and applications. To that end, Microsoft has its eyes on perhaps the biggest prize: making Windows 10 the primary OS for XR industry-wide. That’s perhaps a little obvious; every PC-connected VR experience currently makes use of Windows. But Android is a big player there as well--most notably for Daydream and Gear VR--and because mobile XR is a key segment of the overall market, Android is a major competitor to Windows.

Perhaps a better way to describe the mobile XR market is to put “mobile” in quotation marks. Typically, when we talk about “mobile” devices, we mean smartphones and tablets, which almost entirely run on Android. However, in XR, “mobile” really refers to the nature of the hardware. Untethered HMDs are going to be of enormous importance to the non-enthusiast space. Think light entertainment and productivity as opposed to hardcore gaming, although some level of “serious” gaming could be part of that. Look no further than Intel’s Project Alloy as evidence of how that could work.

For these untethered HMDs, hardware makers have to make some tough choices. Android is a mature OS, and when you see Qualcomm launching programs aimed at jumpstarting mobile HMD development, you see an Android-based future for XR. But it doesn’t have to mean that, and that’s where Microsoft sees a big opportunity. Why can’t a “mobile” HMD have an x86 chip and run Windows? Further, as we’ve recently learned, Windows should run on ARM processors now (no, not like that).

Windows Mixed Reality: The Linchpin

The linchpin of the whole OS battle is Windows Mixed Reality, formerly known as the Windows Holographic shell. Windows Holographic Mixed Reality is a shell that runs on top of Windows 10. Simply put, it gives you all Universal Apps, plus lots of other content, in a mixed reality environment.

We’ve seen many times how incredibly compelling that is for HoloLens, but it will also be necessary for other types of HMDs. A PC-connected mainstream HMD needs to give you options for productivity. So does any untethered HMD. The brilliant idea behind Windows Mixed Reality is that you can get those Universal Apps and more on a HoloLens-like device with clear lenses, a fully occluded VR HMD, or a mixed reality HMD that can be occluded or can give you visual access to the real world via some kind of camera passthrough. This is not to mention whatever ends up happening with the company's Project Scorpio.

“Windows Holographic” essentially limits the shell, in name if not in practice, to only HoloLens-like devices. Therefore, “Windows Mixed Reality” is a name more befitting Microsoft's plans for XR dominance.

  • shane_50
    I dont know why they just don't brand themselves as xr as it encompasses all realities into the one thus creating less confusion for the general public all they need to know is xr will offer them a reality based experience with no explanation of what is the difference between ar vr and mr . Plus Xr just looks cooler thats why xtreme sports or the x games embraced this just looks hip .
    Reply
  • Supporter
    When you fail at something... change its name and say that's what you intended it to be in the first place.
    Reply
  • neonray
    Simple! Its not xr, its MR (Mixed Reality). MR is used by many in the industry and is getting used by techies and companies, now please dont bring on xr stuff and add to the confusion!
    Reply
  • shane_50
    The general public has to deal with such tech terms like vr ar mr immersive 360 cr hr imagine how confussed they will become about each one and whats the difference crazy stuff the old tried and proven method in life always works the " kiss " method keep it simple stupid still applies today xr
    Reply
  • scolaner
    19395277 said:
    When you fail at something... change its name and say that's what you intended it to be in the first place.

    19395872 said:
    Simple! Its not xr, its MR (Mixed Reality). MR is used by many in the industry and is getting used by techies and companies, now please dont bring on xr stuff and add to the confusion!

    We could have a spirited debate about this (uhh, are we about to?), but let me start by acknowledging that you're mostly right. The whole of the spectrum is indeed "mixed reality." At one end of the spectrum is AR (see through lenses, some things added to actual reality), and at the other end there's fully occluded VR. Everything else is somewhere on that spectrum. So...yes, it's all technically "mixed reality."

    But in practice, calling *everything* on the spectrum "mixed reality" is problematic. Let's say I'm describing the Oculus Rift. Do I call it a "mixed reality HMD"? No, because that would be confusing. If I'm trying to explain what it is, I have to call it a "VR HMD". But...there are also HMDs that do mixed reality, which is to say, they mix elements of the virtual and real worlds. I would call that a "mixed reality HMD".

    In other words, the term that possibly most accurately describes the whole of the spectrum is BOTH a general term AND a specific one. #nomenclatureprobs

    I like "XR" because it's ONLY a general term. And the "x" is kind of like a variable, sort of like (A, V, or M)R. And it's a cross symbol, as in a crossing of realities. Eh. Fun.

    Reply
  • neonray
    When MR comprises of AR & VR, why would jump out and bring a new xr!?
    Funny guys! MR is complete and ultimate! That's it!
    Reply
  • Knowing that Windows 10 market share dropped last month and Windows 7 market went up tells me that people drop Win10 like there is no tomorrow. Microsoft is trying to make a strong case for Windows 10 which is slowly becoming an epic failure.
    Reply
  • southernshark
    Love the way MR or XR is going. I will never buy a VR headset, but will be an early adopter of the second generation MR/XR products (which won't really make me an early adopter... but will make me interested in a more finished product). The potential for adding to the real world is huge, as Mr. Trump might say. I never want to be fully immersed in a technology, the way VR does, but MR lets you stay part of the world while enjoying extra stuff and that is great.
    Reply