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Getting Physical With Razer: First U.S. RazerStore Opens In SF On May 21

If you want to get your hands on Razer products, the first place you look is online at sites like Amazon, Newegg and the company’s own digital store. However, residents in Bangkok, Thailand; Taipei City, Taiwan; and Manila, Philippines can actually visit a RazerStore, a physical retail location selling all things Razer. On May 21, the company will open another branch, this time in San Francisco, its first U.S. location.

Specifically, the store is located at the Westfield San Francisco Centre, and it will take up nearly 1,300 square feet of space on two levels of the mall. Inside, customers can check out Razer’s lineup of products such as keyboards, mice, headsets, laptops and apparel. The store also features 20 gaming stations where customers can use Razer products to play games, listen to audio or see various peripherals in action.

With this RazerStore, as well as the Asian retail locations, the company joins the likes of Apple and Microsoft in providing a physical storefront to showcase its product lineup. Both Oculus and HTC are toying with the same with demos available at Best Buy, GameStop and Microsoft Store locations.

Unless you attended a tech or gaming show, it's usually rare for consumers to spend quality time with a Razer product before launch. With the RazerStore, you can now get first-hand experience with the latest peripherals and systems to give you a better idea of what to expect before buying anything. There’s no word yet on future expansion plans for other RazerStore locations in the U.S., but if the San Francisco store is successful, it could bring about more branches throughout the country.

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  • warezme
    I don't know if it would be profitable for them to have an area display inside existing stores like Best Buy. I had to rely on video reviews and third party information to decide on purchasing a Razer Blade. The 970m version had great specs and I didn't like any of the new Alienwares so I took a chance. Fortunately it turned out to be a fantastic bit of kit and no issues to date. This is very telling considering I was one of the first to order the new series when it came out.
    Reply
  • jaber2
    They have to stop using my IP ByGamers
    Reply
  • adam non
    Brands like Razer and Alienware either expand into a (fast growth) market or get left behind because of the cost of continuous technology advances (e.g. GTX1080) and lower cost of entry (for competitors and for first time customers, e.g. the "new" users attracted to VR ... imagine the number of people get VR for the next gift-giving season ...)
    By having a bricks and mortar store front Razer goes from "if you know what you're doing, you by a 'real' computer" to "I tried it and it was obviously better, so I paid more, but I got a computer that works." That's the single pushback I hear "I need to use it and I tried in that chain store but it was not set up properly, the people there didn't know anything, I waited forever for their "game guy" to come, but he was selling a big screen TV to a married couple asking about their house decor." etc.
    Reply
  • Jake Hall
    Too expensive
    Reply
  • rantoc
    Razer have become a no go company after wanting me to register a synapse account just to get the frigging drivers for a mouse... would hardly be surpricing if the customers have to register/log in before allowed entry to the store where they sell their overpriced plastic garbage.
    Reply
  • rantoc
    Have to register for synapse account to gain entry to the store? Just like downloading a frigging mouse driver? Razer have become a no go company after that stunt!
    Reply