Samsung Unleashes 57-inch 8K Mini-LED, 49-inch OLED Neo Gaming Monitors

Samsung 57-inch Odyssey Neo G9
(Image credit: Samsung)

Samsung is kicking off CES 2023 early with the debut of two new monitors aimed at the gaming crowd: the 57-inch Odyssey Neo G9 and the 49-inch Odyssey OLED G9. Both monitors are sure to set gamer tongues wagging, but the former goes bonkers regarding specs.

The ginormous 57-inch panel features a Dual UHD resolution, meaning it’s the equivalent of two 4K monitors sitting side-by-side. Combined with a 1000R curve, the latest Odyssey Neo G9 provides a resolution of 7680 x 2160 with an aspect ratio of 32:9.

While that dizzying resolution sounds appealing, you’d need something like Nvidia’s flagship GeForce RTX 4090 graphics card to even entertain the possibility of gaming at 7680 x 2160. With that said, the Odyssey Neo G9 supports the new DisplayPort 2.1 standard (which supports lossless Display Stream Compression) and supports a refresh rate of up to 240Hz.

Samsung 57-inch Odyssey Neo G9

(Image credit: Samsung)

The panel features mini LED backlighting technology, which should help boost the native contrast ratio (1,000,000:1) and improve dynamic range. In addition, it incorporates a matte finish to help cut down on distracting reflections with such a large monitor.

If the 57-inch Odyssey Neo G9 is too overbearing for your desk, Samsung also announced the Odyssey OLED G9. If you recall, Samsung announced the Odyssey OLED G8 back at IFA 2022, and that monitor features a 34-inch (3440 x 1440) 1800R panel with a 175Hz refresh rate, 0.1 ms response time and VESA DisplayHDR 400 True Black certification.

Samsung Odyssey OLED G9

(Image credit: Samsung)

The Odyssey OLED G9 bumps the panel size to 49 inches while maintaining the 1800R curvature and VESA DisplayHDR 400 True Black status. However, the display resolution jumps to 5120 x 1440 for the Quantum Dot-OLED panel, which boasts a contrast ratio of 1,000,000:1. 

The maximum refresh rate has increased from 175Hz to 240Hz. Finally, Samsung enhances the Odyssey OLED G9 with its Samsung Gaming Hub, which provides in-monitor streaming access to cloud services like Nvidia GeForce Now and Xbox Cloud Gaming without connecting directly to a PC or game console.

Unfortunately, Samsung hasn’t provided us pricing or availability for the 57-inch Odyssey Neo G9 (G95NC) and the 49-inch Odyssey OLED G9 (G95SC). However, we have the feeling that both will make a mad dash to top our best gaming monitors list.

Brandon Hill is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware. He has written about PC and Mac tech since the late 1990s with bylines at AnandTech, DailyTech, and Hot Hardware. When he is not consuming copious amounts of tech news, he can be found enjoying the NC mountains or the beach with his wife and two sons.

  • brandonjclark
    I just want a 16x10 HighRefresh 4K OLED.

    Puhleeeeease!
    Reply
  • OneMoreUser
    7680 x*2160 is not 8K, it is 2x4K which is only half the pixels of 8K. I bet it is just TG that got it wrong and not Samsung.

    4K is 2192021080 = 38402160
    8k is 4192041080 = 76804320
    Reply
  • thisisaname
    I like the width, but for me it needs more height.

    In 1st person view it would be like looking out of a slit visor.

    Edit : Has for price if you have to ask it is not for you. Lets look at the words used Gaming, 8k and curve and fast refresh it is going to be 4090 price. DisplayPort 2.1 shame the card that could drive it does not do that standard :O
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    OneMoreUser said:
    7680 x*2160 is not 8K, it is 2x4K which is only half the pixels of 8K. I bet it is just TG that got it wrong and not Samsung.

    4K is 2192021080 = 38402160
    8k is 4192041080 = 76804320
    A quick Google search reveals dozens of articles regarding the new monitor and call it 8k.
    Reply
  • voyteck
    drivinfast247 said:
    A quick Google search reveals dozens of articles regarding the new monitor and call it 8k.

    A quick Google search reveals thousands of articles regarding Full HD, WQHD and Ultra HD PC displays and calling it 1080p (or 2K), 1440p (or 2.5K) and 4K, respectively.
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    voyteck said:
    A quick Google search reveals thousands of articles regarding Full HD and WQHD PC displays and calling it 1080p and 1440p, respectively (or 2K and 2.5K, for that matter).
    Yes
    Reply
  • Fates_Demise
    OneMoreUser said:
    7680 x*2160 is not 8K, it is 2x4K which is only half the pixels of 8K. I bet it is just TG that got it wrong and not Samsung.

    4K is 2192021080 = 38402160
    8k is 4192041080 = 76804320
    It actually is 8k. It's just not in a 16:9 ratio. 2k,4k,8k only refers to the horizontal pixels.
    Reply
  • Geef
    Those super-wide monitors kinda creep me out. Every time I look at them I get the feeling the middle of the monitor is slowly being peeled apart by the weight of each side. Those middle pixels slowly tearing, screaming as they are torn in half... :ROFLMAO:
    Reply
  • mac_angel
    I'm happy with my three Samsung RU8000 55" 4K TVs with Freesync in surround mode. 11,520x2160 (which is still not 8K). 180* viewing, and more than enough height so it doesn't look like you're looking through a visor.
    Reply
  • Ar558
    People never understand that 8K is 4x 4K in the same way 4k is 4x 1080p, it's not intuitive so people always screw it up. But then again a 7680x2160 monitor is 8K along one axis and for a marketing department that's enough to put it on the box.
    Reply
  • voyteck
    Ar558 said:
    People never understand that 8K is 4x 4K in the same way 4k is 4x 1080p, it's not intuitive so people always screw it up. But then again a 7680x2160 monitor is 8K along one axis and for a marketing department that's enough to put it on the box.

    Technically speaking, 4K is not 4 x Full HD, since it's 4096 x 2160, not 3840 x 2160, and Full HD is not the same as 1080p, since the latter refers to the broadcasting signal. Renowned sources shouldn't use these terms interchangeably.
    Reply