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Acer Predator X25 360 Hz Monitor Review: Raw Power and Speed for eSports

The ultimate display for no-holds-barred gaming systems

Acer Predator X25
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Shutterstock, Acer)

To read about our monitor tests in-depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test PC Monitors. We cover brightness and contrast testing on page two.

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

We’ve rounded up the fastest monitors from recent reviews to compare the Predator X25’s performance. At 360 Hz is the Alienware AW2521H and Asus ROG Swift PG259QN. At 280 Hz is Asus’ TUF VG259QM. Running at 240 Hz are the Aorus FI25F and BenQ XL2546K. All are IPS panels, except the BenQ, which is TN and has the best blur reduction feature we’ve ever seen.

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Acer Predator X25

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Acer Predator X25

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Acer Predator X25

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Once we turned the Max Brightness option on, we were able to top out the X25 at over 447 nits. Otherwise, it’s limited to around 225 nits. That’s plenty of light for any environment and compares favorably with the other screens in our comparison group.

The X25’s black levels are higher than average, even for the latest Fast IPS panels, which have a bit less contrast than their slower, standard IPS cousins. But the X25's resulting contrast is fair at 934.1:1. Note that Asus manages to squeeze out an impressive 1,265:1 from its 360 Hz monitor.

After Calibration to 200 nits

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Acer Predator X25

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Acer Predator X25

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Acer Predator X25

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Our calibration (see recommended settings on page one) boosted the X25’s standing in the black level and contrast tests from fifth to fourth place. The 360Hz Asus monitor, however, offers the best native contrast by around 20%.

ANSI contrast after calibration is at the same level as the static value, which speaks well to the X25’s build and quality control. Ultimately, these monitors are about speed, but if you’re looking for the small differences, contrast performance is the most visible metric.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.
  • escksu
    Not many games could hit 360fps even at 1080.
    Reply
  • helper800
    escksu said:
    Not many games could hit 360fps even at 1080.
    Almost all of the competitive esports titles easily hit 300+ with the right hardware and settings.
    Reply
  • clonazepam
    LG 27GP83B-B review on the way? I'm excited to read about this one.
    Reply
  • helper800
    clonazepam said:
    LG 27GP83B-B review on the way? I'm excited to read about this one.
    You should check out the Viewsonic XG270QG I am almost 100% certain it uses the same panel. I also happen to own it and can verify that its awesome.
    Reply
  • clonazepam
    helper800 said:
    You should check out the Viewsonic XG270QG I am almost 100% certain it uses the same panel. I also happen to own it and can verify that its awesome.

    That one does look really nice, but doesn't seem to have display port 1.4 enabling HDR etc, not that HDR is a huge deal but I'm looking forward to solid review going over all the details like higher brightness / hdr capability etc
    Reply
  • helper800
    clonazepam said:
    That one does look really nice, but doesn't seem to have display port 1.4 enabling HDR etc, not that HDR is a huge deal but I'm looking forward to solid review going over all the details like higher brightness / hdr capability etc
    Yeah, the only thing the XG270QG does not have is an HDR certification. It is listed as 350 nits brightness and seems to be around 300-400 with day to day use. No issues there for me.
    Reply