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Asus MG28UQ 28-inch Ultra HD FreeSync Gaming Monitor Review

Asus MG-series has always represented a solid value alternative to its premium ROG products. Today we’re looking at the MG28UQ, a 28-inch Ultra HD monitor with FreeSync.

Color Gamut & Performance

For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, please click here.

We saw some decent gains from calibration in the grayscale tests. Let’s see how color gamut and luminance are affected.

If you observe color tracking from the central point (white), you can see how the entire gamut is impacted. The outermost targets aren’t going to change from grayscale adjustments but the hue and saturation of the inner ones will definitely shift. And that’s where the majority of content lies: in between white and the maximum saturation of each color. The MG28UQ shows a general under-saturation of red and an over-saturation of blue. The top of the triangle is pretty good, although yellow is off in hue. Also of note are the luminance levels which are a bit low. Overall errors ride on both sides of the visible threshold (3dE). The average Delta E here is 3.28.

The sRGB mode proves to be the best out-of-box preset in the color gamut test. Saturation and hue points are almost all on target. Red is greatly improved over the Racing mode as are yellow and magenta. Blue is unchanged however. Comparing the two default modes in regular content shows sRGB to be more vivid and natural than Racing. The average error has now dropped to 2.56dE.

Calibrating the User mode makes a subtle but noticeable positive difference. It’s definitely worth the effort and the slight loss of contrast. Errors are now all below 3dE except for blue which is still over-saturated. We looked at the chroma charts from other 28-inch Ultra HD monitors and found similar performance in all of them. Blue is a little over and red is a little under but color is generally accurate with reasonably low errors for this price point.

Now we return to the comparison group.

The best TN screen here is the AOC which improves its accuracy with a few gamma tweaks. The rest are all in a small window of performance which raises no issues worth concern. The top-finishing ViewSonic not only sets a high standard but backs it up with a factory calibration. Regardless, we have no complaints about the MG28UQ. And as an added bonus, it has a color saturation control. If you want a little more pop, just up the slider a few clicks.

Gamut Volume: Adobe RGB 1998 And sRGB

Our gamut volume calculations use only maximum saturations, so the MG28UQ comes up a little short in red. This won’t impact gaming or productivity in the slightest. Those needing a proofing display however may want to generate their own ICC profile to ensure maximum precision.

  • lugi20
    60 hz gaming doesn't appeal to me at any resolution. 1440p at 144 hz or better is really the sweet spot at the moment. I wish companies would focus more on that for gaming.
    Reply
  • QWERASZX
    28" 4K is just a waste to time and money go for the 32" or 40" and be done with it
    Reply
  • QWERASZX
    ultra wide aspect is nice but jesus ppl there your eyes beg borrow and steal your way to IPS or simmilar stop wasting your time on TN i still have every IPS display iv owned for the last 15 years even an old 19" sony medical display.... NOTHING ---- Nothing else matters video cards come and go but your eyes will only ever degrade Treat them nice although LGs new 65" oled is really contrasty
    Reply
  • rwinches
    So the AOC is the the 'best deal' at this point in time as 4K @ 60 is what current graphics cards can manage. It comes factory calibrated. You could buy three for a little more than the price of one of the others.

    Not ready to change my triple AOC 24" 1080 @ 144 setup just yet though. I do want freesync, but so much new tech is on it's way so...

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/aoc-u2879vf-28-inch-4k-uhd-freesync-monitor,4575.html
    Reply
  • sillynilly
    You get what you pay for . . .
    Reply
  • whitelightsaber
    How long is it going to be before I see the 32 inch 1440p 144hz 1ms ips monitor I have been dreaming of??
    Reply
  • f-14
    3800 pixels @60hz = $185, not a penny more.
    Reply
  • picture_perfect
    18415465 said:
    60 hz gaming doesn't appeal to me at any resolution. 1440p at 144 hz or better is really the sweet spot at the moment. I wish companies would focus more on that for gaming.

    18416803 said:
    So the AOC is the the 'best deal' at this point in time as 4K @ 60 is what current graphics cards can manage. It comes factory calibrated. You could buy three for a little more than the price of one of the others.

    Not ready to change my triple AOC 24" 1080 @ 144 setup just yet though.

    18417442 said:
    How long is it going to be before I see the 32 inch 1440p 144hz 1ms ips monitor I have been dreaming of??

    Ditto. Manufacturers push 4K because it generates more revenue. It doesn't matter we the consumers pay more for a worse experience. They figured out nobody wanted 3Dtv. Maybe someday they'll figure this out: 4K still not ready for prime time.

    Reply
  • ledhead11
    For those who haven't had time to spend with one. Cinema 4k(4096x2160) w/ 10 bit, I have a LG MU 31", color is something to experience. I have an Asus 278q(1440p 144hz) 8 bit color depth. I love it but I can definitely see a difference in the spectrums. For fast I love my Asus, but to look around and take it all in the LG rocks.

    Bottom line, its not just about FPS. We need a 4k, 10bit, 144hz and that will take DP 1.3 or DP 1.4.
    Reply
  • zthomas
    I got a acer g-sync 28.. price is about the same.. they sorta look alike to.. these new monitors will up your gaming .. and skills too..
    Reply