Skip to main content

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U USB-C Gaming Monitor Review: King of the 43-Inch Class

Class-leading color and contrast

 Gigabyte Aorus FV43U
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Gigabyte)

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking

The FV43U can be enjoyed without calibration in its default Green picture mode. You can also view SDR content in the correct sRGB gamut by choosing the sRGB picture mode or the sRGB Color Space.

Our grayscale and gamma tests use Calman calibration software from Portrait Displays. We describe those our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

Image 1 of 3

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
Image 2 of 3

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
Image 3 of 3

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

Measuring the FV43U in its default state, we found no visible grayscale errors. Our i1 Pro meter showed a slight red weakness but this could not be seen by the naked eye in either test patterns or actual content. Gamma tracking is slightly dark, but this is not a problem, thanks to the panel’s high native contrast.

After our calibration (see page 1), grayscale tracking is near perfection with all errors below 1 Delta E (dE). That is pro-level performance. Gamma is slightly improved as well and tracks very close to the 2.2 standard.

The sRGB picture mode (third chart) runs a bit warm with slightly visible errors in brightness steps over 50%. There are no adjustments available to fix this, but in actual content, the error wasn’t a major issue.

Comparisons

Image 1 of 4

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

With a 2.12dE average grayscale error, there is no need to calibrate the FV43U if you choose the Green picture mode. Meanwhile, the Acer CG437K is one of the most accurate monitors we’ve reviewed out of the box. With calibration though, the FV43U is its match, as is the Asus PG43UQ.

None of the monitors here have any significant gamma issues. The FV43U keeps its range of values tight at just 0.16 and it runs 2.73% off the 2.2 spec with a 2.28 actual value. The errors are dark rather than light, which is a good thing for high contrast panels. VA can typically operate at a slightly higher gamma value and still maintain greater picture depth than IPS or TN monitors.

Color Gamut Accuracy

Our color gamut and volume testing use Portrait Displays’ Calman software. For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here.

Image 1 of 3

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
Image 2 of 3

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)
Image 3 of 3

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Portrait Displays Calman)

The FV43U has a huge color gamut and covers it with good accuracy. Generally, it’s a little oversaturated but not overly so. Red and green have a little more punch than the rest, but hue targets are on or close to the mark. Our calibration (second chart) changed little in the gamut test. The average error is only slightly lower (2.3dE versus 2.5dE) and looked the same to the naked eye. Gamers shopping for a colorful monitor won’t be disappointed.

Choosing the sRGB picture mode (third chart) delivers a superb sRGB color gamut that has no visible flaws. Red is slightly oversaturated, but the errors are below the visible threshold. This is excellent performance.

Comparisons

Image 1 of 2

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 2

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The FV43U lags slightly behind the other screens in our gamut accuracy test, but none of the monitors have visible errors. Gigabyte’s screen has the largest gamut, so that will put it in the win column for most users.

With over 107% DCI-P3 coverage, the FV43U is one of the most colorful monitors we’ve tested. In our database, it’s only bested by the 27-inch MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD (112% DCI-P3) and the professional Acer ConceptD CP7271K (110% DCI-P3). The FV43U’s sRGB mode also completely fills the gamut at over 102% volume. Just add in a software profile, and this screen is ready for color-critical work.

Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.
  • thepersonwithaface45
    Eye balling this right now, only thing is the size of the thing. I want 32", 144hz, for ~$1000. That's too much to ask for though, apparently.
    Reply
  • helper800
    The only market segment for this is those that want 1000 nits HDR content and being smaller than most of the other comparable options. The LG 48 inch CX and C1 TVs do everything else that this does but better for the same price. I personally was able to snag a 55 inch CX for 1350 at Costco about 1 month ago and have zero regrets. Some may say its too big, however, vesa mounted and angled down at 20 degrees and 5 feet from my head its perfect. A monitor like this will be a hard sell for most at 1500.

    I feel like the majority of prosumers would prefer a 32-38 inch 4k 120+hz VRR and HDR at 600-1000 nits for 800-1200 dollars instead if this.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    I just paid $850 for this, via Amazon, a week or so ago:

    https://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/philips_436m6vbpab.htm
    Absolutely love the thing and use it as a DP 1.4 monitor, not a TV. 4k never looked so good for me. At first, I thought it might be too big--but after a week of working with it I'm not sure how I ever got along without it. Gaming on this monitor is incredible--you'll feel as if you've never actually seen your games before--it's a whole new dimension. I sit about 4-5 feet away, and that actually seems ideal. The WCG and the various HDR modes must be seen to be believed.

    Windows10 scaling is marvelous--it's strange, but I use the same scaling settings on this 43" that I used on my former BenQ EW-3270U 32" 4k--175% with 128% font scaling--marvelous. An amusing thing is that Win10 tried to stick me with a 300% scaling initially which was far and away too big! Ugh.

    People who think they have to have the 144Hz probably would turn up their noses at this 60Hz monitor, but I can get far more than 144 fps @ 1440P with vsync off--and AMD's Enhanced Sync all but eliminates page tear. No ghosting whatsoever...very happy.

    But this Gigabyte looks very nice, too! My main reason for making this post is to tell folks they don't need to worry about 43" being too big for their desktops. I am surprised by just how much I've come to like it in the last week! The colors & HDR will blow you away, imo. My old BenQ looks worn out and drab, comparatively--now.

    It dawned on me that I wouldn't be buying a 6800XT anytime soon because of the shortages--not that I didn't want one badly, so I bought a nice monitor, instead. My 5700XT has a lot of life in it yet...;) I'll get a 6800XT at some point, but it's no longer the imperative it was at the end of 2020. This monitor is helping me to fully appreciate just what I've got in the 50th Ann Ed GPU!
    Reply
  • helper800
    waltc3 said:
    I just paid $850 for this, via Amazon, a week or so ago:

    https://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/philips_436m6vbpab.htm
    Absolutely love the thing and use it as a DP 1.4 monitor, not a TV. 4k never looked so good for me. At first, I thought it might be too big--but after a week of working with it I'm not sure how I ever got along without it. Gaming on this monitor is incredible--you'll feel as if you've never actually seen your games before--it's a whole new dimension. I sit about 4-5 feet away, and that actually seems ideal. The WCG and the various HDR modes must be seen to be believed.

    Windows10 scaling is marvelous--it's strange, but I use the same scaling settings on this 43" that I used on my former BenQ EW-3270U 32" 4k--175% with 128% font scaling--marvelous. An amusing thing is that Win10 tried to stick me with a 300% scaling initially which was far and away too big! Ugh.

    People who think they have to have the 144Hz probably would turn up their noses at this 60Hz monitor, but I can get far more than 144 fps @ 1440P with vsync off--and AMD's Enhanced Sync all but eliminates page tear. No ghosting whatsoever...very happy.

    But this Gigabyte looks very nice, too! My main reason for making this post is to tell folks they don't need to worry about 43" being too big for their desktops. I am surprised by just how much I've come to like it in the last week! The colors & HDR will blow you away, imo. My old BenQ looks worn out and drab, comparatively--now.

    It dawned on me that I wouldn't be buying a 6800XT anytime soon because of the shortages--not that I didn't want one badly, so I bought a nice monitor, instead. My 5700XT has a lot of life in it yet...;) I'll get a 6800XT at some point, but it's no longer the imperative it was at the end of 2020. This monitor is helping me to fully appreciate just what I've got in the 50th Ann Ed GPU!
    Thats awesome that you found something that ended up fitting your needs at a price you can live with, cheers and thanks for the info. Personally I cannot got back to 60hz on a monitor for PC gaming.
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    helper800 said:
    The only market segment for this is those that want 1000 nits HDR content and being smaller than most of the other comparable options. The LG 48 inch CX and C1 TVs do everything else that this does but better for the same price. I personally was able to snag a 55 inch CX for 1350 at Costco about 1 month ago and have zero regrets. Some may say its too big, however, vesa mounted and angled down at 20 degrees and 5 feet from my head its perfect. A monitor like this will be a hard sell for most at 1500.

    I feel like the majority of prosumers would prefer a 32-38 inch 4k 120+hz VRR and HDR at 600-1000 nits for 800-1200 dollars instead if this.
    I don't know ... maybe I'm a tiny minority, but I'd really like a 43-inch (basically 40 to 46 inch) 144Hz 4K monitor. For what I do, I'd prefer the larger size -- easier to read -- over the typical 28-inch 4K displays. I've just got enough displays right now that I don't feel the need to pull the trigger on a $1000 monitor.
    Reply
  • mikeyunk
    Any who owns this monitor does it charge over USB-C? I own a AOC AGON 49” ultra wide with USB-C and even though it does charge my work laptop it runs at a much lower resolution and looos terrible. I have to use a USB-C to display port adapter to my AGON display to get the full resolution 5120x1440. I have to charge the laptop with the AC adapter it came with.

    What resolution can you run on this screen via USC-C and does it charge? Basically is anyone using it for work with a laptop and gaming?

    can you run this monitor at 1440p instead of 4K resolution? I’ve got a RTX-2080 TI and that card might not cut it for 4K gaming.
    Reply
  • Geef
    thepersonwithaface45 said:
    Eye balling this right now, only thing is the size of the thing. I want 32", 144hz, for ~$1000. That's too much to ask for though, apparently.

    Just wait a little bit longer. The current Gen doesn't, but next gen monitors will get HDMI 2.1 + 4k along with the 32" and the 144Hz you want hopefully with a tag around $1000.
    Reply
  • Blowsie
    Does this monitor work with gysnc and HDR at the same time? That's what the review suggests to me?
    Reply
  • RS13
    Blowsie said:
    Does this monitor work with gysnc and HDR at the same time? That's what the review suggests to me?

    I have this same question. Also does anyone besides Newegg sell this?! I can't even find listings anywhere else.
    Reply
  • waltc3
    Blowsie said:
    Does this monitor work with gysnc and HDR at the same time? That's what the review suggests to me?

    Can't tell you--but I can tell you that the 43" Philips Momentum DisplayHDR1000 I bought does, and it does a terrific job of it. I went to the NewEgg site and they have two customer reviews on the 43" Gigabyte (in the "Gaming monitor" pages), so I'd suggest you read both. The first guy really liked his--the second one, not so much. But read his review posted on the NewEgg site. I was a bit surprised--actually--as HDR & Freesync work splendidly here. But I'm not sure what hardware the second guy had in the way of a GPU, but his criticisms were fairly monitor-specific, I thought. At any rate, I'm enjoying my HDR games more than I ever have. Until you see a 43" 4k Wide Color Gamut, DisplayHDR 1000-certified monitor in action, you really can't describe how much better things can be. I sure could not.
    Reply