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ViewSonic Elite XG270QC Review: Sub-$500 Excellence at 1440p

165Hz, FreeSync and killer HDR at a good price

ViewSonic Elite XG270QC
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

To read about our monitor tests in-depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test PC Monitors. We cover brightness and contrast testing on page two. 

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level 

We’ve rounded up a group of 27 and 32-inch monitors for comparison to the ViewSonic XG270QC. All support HDR and high refresh rates with Adaptive-Sync. Representing VA is the Gigabyte G32QC and Dell S3220DGF. IPS panels are used in the Aorus’ FI27Q and Asus ROG Strix XG279Q. The Pixio PX278 budget monitor employs a TN panel. 

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ViewSonic Elite XG270QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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ViewSonic Elite XG270QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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ViewSonic Elite XG270QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The ViewSonic XG270QC greatly out-distances its competition in the max output test. Though it’s certified for DisplayHDR 400, it exceeds 600 nits for both SDR and HDR signals. If you choose to use the dynamic contrast option in SDR mode, you can have nearly infinite contrast though there will be some clipping of highlight and shadow detail.

That bright backlight raises the black level higher than the other two VA panels but it’s still darker than the IPS or TN screens. Resulting native contrast is just under 3000:1 which is typical of nearly all the VA monitors we’ve tested. The Gigabyte and Dell screens are better than average when compared to our full database of reviewed screens.

After Calibration to 200 nits 

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ViewSonic Elite XG270QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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ViewSonic Elite XG270QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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ViewSonic Elite XG270QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Calibration doesn’t cost the XG270QC any contrast with a still respectable 2897.4:1 score. Coupled with its large and accurate color gamut, the image is beautifully saturated and natural in all respects. Though there is no sRGB mode for SDR content, we like the extra vibrance.

Intra-image contrast is also quite good at almost 2600:1. ViewSonic’s Elite designation is well earned here with a premium panel built to a high standard. You can see that in terms of native contrast, the IPS and TN panels are well behind the curve.

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  • Chm0012001
    Thanks for the comprehensive review. I'm trying to decide whether to buy this monitor or the Dell s3220dgf. Which of these two monitors will offer the most impactful HDR experience? The Viewsonic has a higher peak brightness (600 nits) but uses an 8 bit panel, whereas the peak brightness of the Dell is lower (500 nits) but has a 10 bit panel.
    Reply